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Slackware?


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#1 paul88ks

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Posted 19 March 2015 - 05:09 PM

I recently read an article that stated that "Slackware" and "Ubuntu" are the most popular versions of Linux,and Linux Mint Mate.As some of you may know,I have been getting my feet wet with several Distros Zorin,Ubuntu,Linux Mint and Peach,which is proving to be my least favorite. Anyway,I have never heard anyone talk about "Slackware".I know from what I have so far that this is NOT an OS for the Linux Newbie.Does anyony here on BC use Slackware.and if so,how do you like it?All Comments Welcome!!!



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#2 Loki123

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Posted 19 March 2015 - 07:53 PM

Slackware is a nice distribution. Currently I'm not using it but I did few years ago.

What I found best at the time is that instead of being like Arch Linux, it uses stable and tested packages. They don't rush into changing to the latest but instead maintain the "if it works, don't mess with it" rule.

The init system is in BSD style. The files are stored in /etc/rc.d/ and if the executable in there does not have the executable flag it doesn't run.

The best thing you can do really is simply to try it. It might be too hard for you or it might not be. You might just meet the love of your live with Slackware, but you never know until you try it. ;)

#3 NickAu

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Posted 19 March 2015 - 08:40 PM

If you want to try a nice little Linux try Puppy. Download it, Burn it to CD and boot it up as Live you will love it. Both Al1000 and I use Puppy Linux. Puppy Linux is also great on older machines. If you have a old XP laptop laying around try puppy on that and get ready to be blown away.

 

Tahrpup uses Ubuntu 14.04 LTS Trusty Tahr packages and includes the bugfixes and improvements from the woof CE build system. It is compatible with Ubuntu 14.04 packages. The Linux kernel version is 3.14.20.

Explore the Tharpup folder at ibiblio or nluug for downloads (Try the PAE build first).



#4 shadow-warrior

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Posted 19 March 2015 - 09:27 PM

I think everyone should have a go at installing Slackware or Gentoo....

 

I have used Slackware it was a very fast very stable OS when all installed and configured...I did make the mistake of installing the minimum CD rather than the DVD the DVD has almost everything you can think of on it and you pick and choose what you want...rather than having to compile lots of things from source..very time consuming.. it wasn't unheard of for people to take 2+ days to install it  now with faster CPUs compile times are a lot faster

In the end you have  and OS the way you want it..with your choice of file manager, your choice of DE, login manager etc..etc  not somone elses..

 

When i installed mine you had to configure the whole network / wifi .set up    now i believe it comes with Network Manager..so 1 big head ache out of the way.. another oddity is that it uses LILO rather than GRUB2 (maybe its changed now) LILO isnt very good with multiboots...

 

there are also a lot of binary packages and scripts around so building a lot of popular packages from source isnt as necessary ...but you do get the packages as they were built ..not patched and modified by 3rd parties..to make them 1 size fits all......

 

Slackware hasnt changed much over the years  it keeps everything as simple as it can puts out a new version about every year when its ready no rush..no panic..

 

22yrs old this year the oldest linux OS

 

You can try Slackware with easier Installation with "Absolute Linux"..... Salix,  Slackel.  though they offer more Binary repos, and maybe other changes from pure Slackware...

 

Spatry on YouTube has a video on installing Slackware  which is helpful........and you DO!!! need to read the documentation and don't expect GUIs for instalation

 

Both ARCH and GENTOO are very similar   in many ways...with Arch you tend to get the latest  binary software packages very quick  and you can be updatig daily if you want. which can cause issues..

 

Gentoo is more Slackware like where you Compile everything yourself which for things like Firefox or Libre office can take an eternity  but you can build them with only the dependencies, language packs etc etc you actually need by editing the package installation ( USE flags)


Edited by shadow-warrior, 19 March 2015 - 09:37 PM.


#5 paul88ks

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Posted 19 March 2015 - 11:03 PM

Lots to think about here- thanks everybody- I have an 80 gig drive that is empty and had already downloaded the Slackware .iso  and just downloaded this-http://ftp.nluug.nl/ftp/pub/os/Linux/distr/puppylinux/puppy-tahr/iso/tahrpup%20-6.0-CE/tahr-6.0-CE_PAE.iso Hope that's the right one! 

 

Loki123

NickAu

Shadow-Warrior---

 

I am going to try the Puppy Linux first live,so I don't have to install just yet. I have started to read the documentation on Slackware first,as it seems it will be a bit more challenging than other distros,I may install it on the 80 gig drive which is empty.The worst that could happen is that I will mess it up,which is fine.That's how I learn,from making mistakes.Remember-I am a piano player- practice makes perfect!  It may be a bit too technical for me ,but we will see.!



#6 Guest_hollowface_*

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Posted 20 March 2015 - 12:36 AM

Over the past while I've been rebuilding my virtual machine collection for VMware Player 7. Aside from re-installing the same-old-same-old I've added a few new distros to try and cover off the different types of distros. Slackware 14.1 is one of the new virtual machines I've made, but I haven't done any fiddling with it as it's not a priority. At some point I'll need to verify that sound works.

The first thing that I noticed is that on Slackware you can choose to install software from pre-compiled binary packages, or use source package build scripts. Other distros I've used are either-or not both. It doesn't appear to support UEFI out-of-box (or at least the disc wouldn't boot in UEFI mode for me) so that's definitely a strike against it in my books. As of yet, I have no opinion on whether I like/dislike the distro, because I haven't used it enough to even say I've used it.
 



#7 shadow-warrior

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Posted 20 March 2015 - 11:28 AM

You may find something on this page to help

 

http://docs.slackware.com/start?do=search&id=UEFI&fulltext=Search



#8 paul88ks

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Posted 24 March 2015 - 10:22 PM

I did download and run puppy Linux Live - what a great little OS! i can think of several uses for this little "puppy"!

 

I am going to hold off on the Slackware install until I have done some more reading. I tried and was stopped dead in my tracks by terminology and "Lingo" i did not understand yet! the .ISO version I downloaded is not a LIVE DVD- and you have to purchase that one- I'm a little short on cash right now- but I have not given up!!



#9 NickAu

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Posted 24 March 2015 - 10:32 PM

 

I did download and run puppy Linux Live - what a great little OS! i can think of several uses for this little "puppy"!

Yes Puppy is a great operating system.



#10 cat1092

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Posted 26 March 2015 - 03:30 AM

Actually anyone who is running FatDog64 700RC or above is getting a dose of Slackware, only they call it 'Slacko'. Release Notes of 700RC. 

 

http://distro.ibiblio.org/fatdog/web/700rc.html

 

Actually FatDog64 version 700 is final, here's the discussion on the Puppy Linux Discussion Forum. 700 was rebuilt from the ground up, it's been 2-3 months since I bothered (or needed) FatDog64, at just over 200MiB, see no need to carry old versions. I'm also a fan of the distro because it's developed less than 30 miles from me at the home of the TarHeels (UNC). Have to support my locals. :)

 

Honestly though, I had been using FatDog64 long before I knew where it came from, only that it was like screaming fast on most modest 64 bit computers, many that Windows 7 was struggling on. I'd use the Live CD to run hardware tests, so that I'd know what was good & what may need further checking. Most of the time, either there was a HDD issue, or a OS reinstall was needed. 

 

http://murga-linux.com/puppy/viewtopic.php?p=829938

 

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Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#11 Al1000

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Posted 26 March 2015 - 04:59 AM

Slacko Puppy is the only "Slackware" Linux I've tried, but it comes with some strange version of Firefox which won't update to the latest version like the Firefox in the *buntu based Puppies do.

#12 Limet

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Posted 26 March 2015 - 09:46 AM

Hi.
I'm using Lubuntu on a laptop (with very low hardware resource) and I'm completely satisfied. Did you know that it only about 150 MB RAM (for good working at least 300 MB)? And it has same support as Ubuntu too. Go to http://lubuntu.net/ and find out more reasons for choose it. 


#13 paul88ks

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Posted 28 March 2015 - 08:51 PM

Actually anyone who is running FatDog64 700RC or above is getting a dose of Slackware, only they call it 'Slacko'. Release Notes of 700RC. 

 

http://distro.ibiblio.org/fatdog/web/700rc.html - Cat - you knew of course that I was going download it the minute you mentioned it- haha- I'm out of blank CD's to burn it to- trip to Fry's tomorrow!!



#14 marcoose777

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Posted 30 March 2015 - 04:09 PM

Hi Paul88ks,

The only gauge of poularity/prevalence vis-a-vis linux distro's is good ol' distro watch, you'll note all the usual suspects are at the top: Ubuntu, Mint, Debian, Mageia, Fedora etc... etc... No one, surprisingly, seems to collate that kind of information. As with all indicators it's a bit duff, it would be nice if actual downloads were ranked, however some distros are available as torrents, and not to mention DVD's too, so imagine the hair splitting and flame warz. Slack is a popular old school distro, but I would be surprised if it were more popular than debian, ubuntu, mint. I liked puppy-slackware when I tried it out on a geriatric old machine years ago. FYI slack started out as a text only distro, very popular with sysadmins. It was highly user configurable, with an awesome set of admin tools. Nowadays it's a fullblown GUI driven desktop, with it's own package manager albeit lacking dependency resolution that other distros do so well - mint,ubuntu etc... My advice to a linux noob will always be to start with Linux mint or Ubuntu, and build your knowledge and skills gently from there, rather than jump in the deep end and try a tricky one like gentoo or one of the other unique/esoteric distros.

Good luck with you journey into NixLand, I hope you have lots of fun exploring



#15 paul88ks

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Posted 30 March 2015 - 04:38 PM

I only started this topic because i read in some tech blog which showed in a pie-chart %use of the top distros. I will try to find the article,I know I bookmarked somewhere.Anyway,Slackware,to my surprise was a LARGE percentage of most distros.The other side of the chart being,of course the better known distros of Ubuntu,Mint. and all the others.As you said - it's not for the newbie,i just wondered that seeing it took up a large part of the pie,why I had never heard of it before??






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