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Ubuntu Mate 14.04.......old school Returns!


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#1 cat1092

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Posted 17 March 2015 - 03:37 AM

Back in 2010, there were lots of ticked off Ubuntu users, and for one reason......Unity! Many abandoned Ubuntu for Linux Mint, which was already headed for high places, as well as other OS, because this was just too much. Even today, I see Unity (as well as the Modern UI of Windows 8) as 'busts'. Too much effort required to perform the simplest of tasks, and last but not least, Canonical made a huge mistake in fixing what wasn't broken, at the time of Unity's release, Ubuntu was still the #1 Linux distro in the world. 

 

What is wrong with having a simple & easy to use Start Menu? Seems that all brands of OS's thinks that consumers wants it more complicated, yet they voted with their wallets, as it turned out, the opposite was true. The world isn't ready for all of the digging through menus, or typing the first 3 or 4 letters of an app to get it to display. 

 

A few years & many complaints over Unity, Ubuntu decided to do something about this, partially go back with the old with the Ubuntu MATE 14.04 LTS release. If one wants a Ubuntu w/out the Amazon adverts (shame on Canonical for adding spyware on it's users) & with an easy to use, back to basics desktop, then Ubuntu 14.04 MATE may be for you. Read on for more, including download links. 

 

https://ubuntu-mate.org/what-is-ubuntu-mate/

 

HTTP downloads are on down the page for those who doesn't prefer the less safe BitTorrent options. This is the LTS release, not 14.10, has 5 years of support. 

 

https://ubuntu-mate.org/trusty/

 

However, I also understand that some prefers 'bleeding edge' releases, though these are normally stable, not as much as LTS releases, if so, here's 14.10. 

 

https://ubuntu-mate.org/utopic/

 

Either way, enjoy! :thumbup2:

 

I'm proud to have been a Linux user for 6 years now, will soon be the same for Linux Mint, and though am biased towards that OS, want our members to see all of the Linux options available. No matter what the OS, I'd rather see anyone on Linux than an unsafe XP computer, and there are many computers that shipped with Vista (or late XP ones) that can run this release & many others. 

 

What a way to bring in my 3,000th post! :guitar:

 

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Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


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#2 NickAu

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Posted 17 March 2015 - 03:46 AM

 

What is wrong with having a simple & easy to use Start Menu?

If I wanted a start menu I would use Windows.

 

 

I see Unity (as well as the Modern UI of Windows 8) as 'busts'. Too much effort required to perform the simplest of tasks, and last but not least, Canonical made a huge mistake in fixing what wasn't broken, at the time of Unity's release, Ubuntu was still the #1 Linux distro in the world.

I love Unity, And I love Dash so easy to use. I do not like that Linux trying to look like Windoze look.

 

 

If one wants a Ubuntu w/out the Amazon adverts (shame on Canonical for adding spyware on it's users)

Easy fixed.



#3 cat1092

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Posted 17 March 2015 - 04:27 AM

 

 

I do not like that Linux trying to look like Windoze look.

 

Actually it was the other way around. Unity was released 28.5 months before Modern UI came out with Windows 8 in late October 2012.

 

Microsoft had that long ahead to know it wasn't going to flush & released it anyway, the rest is history (Windows 8 was a bust). :P

 

As to Unity, and their copycats in Modern UI, I'm not saying it doesn't look good, it just requires more effort on the user's part to navigate around. The reason why to place as many Favorites as possible on that left side of the screen. Things that are seldom used, leave as is. 

 

Yes, I know the Amazon advert can be removed, it's just that some are doing it the wrong way. Simply removing it from the Launcher doesn't undo it's actions, it needs to be disabled altogether. 

 

 

 

If I wanted a start menu I would use Windows.

 

Maybe so, but that type of Start Menu has attracted me and millions of others to Linux. And yes, it's indeed millions. There are over a billion computers in use Worldwide. So even if Linux user base is only 2%, that's still 20 million Linux users. Many have sought similar Start Menus, that's what helped to propel Zorin to the top 20, it's Windows Look Changer. 

 

And one of Linux Mint's distros, Cinnamon, resembles Windows 7 in many ways, and is considered by many to be the 'drop in' replacement for Windows 7. Though I'm not a particular fan of that DE, nor the XFCE version. 

 

Linux Mint MATE is considered as 'the' drop in replacement for Windows as a whole. Rightfully so, I'm by no means a Lunux 'guru', but was able to jump right in there & go. 

 

All OS's has to have some type of Start menu, otherwise they'd be unusable. Too, it could be thought of as a more secure Start menu. It's the same one that I began with Linux 6 years ago, and there was never anything that needed fixing. 

 

The bottom line is, it's better for Ubuntu users to be aware that they have choices. Someone mentioned 'Ubuntu MATE' a few months back & I was thinking like 'what the heck is he talking about?' The only MATE I knew of was Linux Mint. Now I know there's a Ubuntu version also. 

 

And actually wouldn't have know of that, but a sub-link in one of the many 'cheesemakers-linux corner' revealed it. 

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 17 March 2015 - 04:30 AM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#4 mremski

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Posted 17 March 2015 - 07:55 AM

Why should I interact with my computer as if it were a smartphone?  Using my finger on a smartphone still bothers me;  leaves fingerprints all over the place.

 

One needs to keep in mind the distinction between a "desktop environment" and a "window manager".

 

All the *nix systems give you more flexibility than you've ever seen with Windows.  Some people find that intimidating and hard to adjust to, others, feel like they've come home.  Before the Windows start button, commercial Unix systems (Sun, DEC, SGI, etc) had their own versions of one.  Most were "click the right mouse button over an empty spot".  That's all the Start button is:  an easily recognizable way for a user to start doing something.  My favorite is "to shutdown the computer, go the the start button...".

 

Distributions are getting better, but there is still a long way to go on making it easier for users to find alternatives on making the screen look and feel the way they want it to, not the way some programmer or corporate PHB thinks it should.

Documentation is always a sore point with any bit of software;  more so with things like a Linux distribution because good documentation requires that someone make a living off it.


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#5 heyyou325

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Posted 18 March 2015 - 09:38 AM

To each his own.  We all like different things which is why linux is so great for us.  We can keep trying things til we get it really messed up or right.  Don't think I've tried unity yet, but if it's anything like windows 8 I don't want to.  



#6 cat1092

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Posted 19 March 2015 - 01:41 AM

 

 

 Don't think I've tried unity yet, but if it's anything like windows 8 I don't want to.  

 

Then you most certainly don't want to mess with Unity, by that I'm not saying it's worse or better, it's just a whole different approach to using a computer. Generally speaking, the Unity interface would be more attractive to the younger computer users, especially those who has never known for years a traditional 'as we know it' Start Menu. Whether or not it's Linux or Windows doesn't matter, both Unity & Modern UI were largely unwelcomed by the computing community by a overwhelming majority, though to play it fair, there were a small percentage that prefers the newer interfaces. I respect the decision of choice for everyone, that's what Linux is about. 

 

While I don't want to see my OP become a total obsession over Start menus, the fact is, Ubuntu MATE does bring back classic, proven technology & feature set, as well as the one that introduced & embraced many users to Linux. The majority of Linux OS's does not use Unity, rather a simple Start Menu that's easy to navigate for many users. As such, there's zero reason to be running outdated, unsupported & potentially dangerous OS's such as XP, when there are modern OS's that has a like function set, with just a slight learning curve to get acquainted, along with the desire to do so. XP users in particular will soon see, that the computing world will leave them behind, and it won't be long before it happens. Google promised only one year of support, and April 8 is less than three weeks away from this post. Once browser upgrades ends for the OS, that's the end of the 14 year road. Sites where transactions are made can deny access to non-current browsers and/or OS's, and they know what OS one is using. If this scenario fits any reader of this, Ubuntu MATE can be the answer. Some users may have a capable computer as is to run it. Especially later model XP computers, or those from Vista downgrades. 

 

Trust me on this one, if I can learn & use Linux as my main OS, anyone can. While there's been many that's called me a 'genius', among other power terms regarding PC's, the fact is, I'm just an ordinary user of computers. Just because I can install an OS, printer (though am still seeking a solution in a Topic of my own regarding this), router & network setup, hardware swaps such as SSD/HDD/RAM upgrades, performing the maintenance we're supposed to be doing (backup & security), among all of the other 'little' things I can do, does not make me a genius. Though I'd like to have the ability to, I don't possess the ability to answer everyone's Topics, and every time I get a PM for assistance, they're pointed to the Forum. Backroom Topic solving defeats the purpose of having a forum to discuss issues, and I want everyone to have the same opportunity as I've used for years, searching for an answer & landing on the Topic page. 

 

Most of the things I know, is because I save manuals & other documentation (it can be said with great accuracy that I'm a certified packrat), and search for answers anywhere & everywhere I can. Many of the things I've done for myself & others, were learned on the run, and at least a third of those came from this site (higher percentage rate if it was security issues alone). 

 

It was the same with Linux, by chance my first one was Ubuntu, it was the most popular Linux distro on the planet in 2009 & closely resembled the MATE version. My only mistake was first in using the Wubi installer to try it out, then using an app that I recommend to no one called 'Computer Janitor'. I found it rather odd that Linux was installed as a Windows program, yet could no longer boot into XP because I ran that ultra powerful cleaning app. If I possessed the experience that I now have, would have used a bootable partition tool to restore the bootloader. At the time, didn't know how to perform this task, though over the years, I did learn how to perform it & have used it numerous times to delete a Linux install w/out losing the OS that the computer shipped with. 

 

What the experience at the time did however, kind of made me lose interest in Ubuntu, and for a few months bounced from distro to distro until I found Linux Mint, and that wasn't in the open, rather a message passed onto me though an email contact from a moderator of a prominent Linux forum. Because I was dual booting with XP, many were against me from Day One, and I took a lot of abuse that I shouldn't have. Was on my last (unjustified) warning there, and the kind moderator asked for my email address, with a note that the PM would be deleted in 24 hours. I responded, the message was deleted, she turned me onto Linux Mint & the rest is history. We remain friends to this day, though to prevent backlash, will never betray her trust in me. 

 

Yet had I received the assistance I was looking for initially with Ubuntu, would have likely at least ran it for another year, until Unity was released, before moving on & likely would have learned about Mint through the natural process, word of mouth. 

 

The great thing is, Ubuntu users now has at least two choices of desktops, MATE & Unity, and I know there is at least one more in Studio, however have never tried the distro, so cannot comment as to it's function, only that it's another choice. There are also spinoffs of Ubuntu. the various 'buntu' OS's, though am not sure who distributes these, plus the many other OS built on Ubuntu, and Mint is one of the these, along with at least one other popular one in Zorin OS. 

 

However, old school diehard users of Ubuntu prior to mid 2010 has all of the reason to return, if unsatisfied with that they're running, or simply wish to return. Ubuntu MATE is alive and looks to be here to stay. Linux users who likes to game will be happy to know that Ubuntu MATE is fully compatible with Steam for Linux. 

 

There is a middle aged computer that I'm still working on restoring, and being that Mint KDE isn't turning out to be my cup of tea, am proud to announce that Ubuntu MATE 14.04 will be the next OS to be installed onto the PC. There are already enough Linux Mint MATE installs scattered around, so will give the Ubuntu version a shot this time around. 

 

Ubuntu MATE looks to be a potentially great OS in the making, one that will not only bring back some who were ticked off in 2010, but others from non-Linux backgrounds as well. Finally, there's no shortage of Ubuntu support, another plus for the OS. There's no reason not to give the OS a shot. 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#7 Al1000

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Posted 19 March 2015 - 04:19 AM

Ubuntu (12.04) was the first Linux OS I ever installed and I was disappointed at the time to find that the Unity desktop doesn't have a menu, so I started looking at distros that have menus and finally settled on Kubuntu 14.04 when it was released. But now that I've been using it for a while, I find that I hardly ever use the menu. I have a panel with the applications I use frequently and start them by clicking the relevant icons, and tend to type the names of applications that I use infrequently into the application search box when I want to use them, rather than dig through the menu looking for them.

I was planning on upgrading Kubuntu 14.04 to Kubuntu 15.04, but since I've realised that I use KDE as Unity is designed to be used - i.e. by having frequently used applications in a panel and typing the names of infrequently used applications into DASH - I am now considering upgrading to Ubuntu Unity 15.04 instead.

Edited by Al1000, 19 March 2015 - 04:20 AM.


#8 NickAu

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Posted 19 March 2015 - 04:31 AM

 

Ubuntu (12.04) was the first Linux OS I ever installed and I was disappointed at the time to find that the Unity desktop doesn't have a menu

 

Want menu?

sudo apt-add-repository ppa:diesch/testing
sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get install classicmenu-indicator

workspace-1_014.png



#9 Al1000

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Posted 19 March 2015 - 05:28 AM

Want menu?

Not any more. :)

It's amazing just how customisable GNU/Linux is, although that is something that takes a while to realise. I hadn't considered the possibility of adding a menu to Unity, although I might have guessed that someone would have made one.

#10 heyyou325

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Posted 19 March 2015 - 09:42 AM

 

 

Cat
Most of the things I know, is because I save manuals & other documentation (it can be said with great accuracy that I'm a certified packrat), and search for answers anywhere & everywhere I can. Many of the things I've done for myself & others, were learned on the run, and at least a third of those came from this site (higher percentage rate if it was security issues alone). 

I've got an 8 gb thumb drive full, and a 4 gb partially full of how to books, manuals,etc from linux, plus I've got a computer bookmark folder (?) the length of 2 1/2 screens with other tutorials, threads (from here and other forums), and other linux related things.  I can usually remember I've read something to look back up (I can remember the general idea, but not enough to put into practice), but then I can't find wheere it is.  I can look right at a how to book that says exactly what I'm looking for and think no that's not it, and not look in it.  And after I read just so much, everything seems to run together.  I used to learn and remember things real quickly when I was younger.  

  I think I did try unity once thinking back now, it was in open suse, I think.   

 

Cat

The great thing is, Ubuntu users now has at least two choices of desktops, MATE & Unity, and I know there is at least one more in Studio, however have never tried the distro, so cannot comment as to it's function, only that it's another choice. There are also spinoffs of Ubuntu. the various 'buntu' OS's, though am not sure who distributes these, plus the many other OS built on Ubuntu, and Mint is one of the these, along with at least one other popular one in Zorin OS. 

  Ubuntu studio (in my opinion has more and different programs in graphics and multimedia, but otherwise behaves just like ubuntu.  At least with the xfce desktop.  Each desktop has good and bad points to it, and I've decided to get the feel of the distro I should try them with the same desktop.  It's the one seems to work best for me.  O Cat, I have use the newest ubuntu, open suse, and mint (not sure of the desktops without starting it up and looking, and it isn't near me at the moment) on my 64 bit laptop and am having a hard time cutting it down to 2.  I like all three.  Wasn't this where I read a thread about how to change the desktop, using terminal.  If done right, you can change to any you want on an existing distro.  If done wrong, I can attest, can mess up that partition and others.

 

 

Al
It's amazing just how customisable GNU/Linux is, although that is something that takes a while to realise. I hadn't considered the possibility of adding a menu to Unity, although I might have guessed that someone would have made one. 

  This is where I need to begin now.  I've tried enough distros.  I need to learn how to really use them, and you can add the start menu to windows or linux, move it around, or whatever.  I've got a how to thingy on it somewhere.  Plus Nick gave directions on how to above.  I've got several lists of command lines saved to learn how to use the terminal, but when I'm looking for one command, I can't find it to save my life.   Shoot, I can't even figure out how to do quotes here some of the time.



#11 cat1092

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Posted 21 March 2015 - 03:02 AM

 

 

Ubuntu (12.04) was the first Linux OS I ever installed and I was disappointed at the time to find that the Unity desktop doesn't have a menu

 

Want menu?

sudo apt-add-repository ppa:diesch/testing
sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get install classicmenu-indicator

workspace-1_014.png

 

 

Thank You, Nick! :guitar:

 

Now I can add that function back to 12.04, the non-PAE version that I had to install on my 11 year old notebook. 

 

I've greatly missed that menu, it was the default Ubuntu Start Menu for years prior to Unity. 

 

EDIT: It worked!  :)     Now if I could do away with that sidebar on the left of the monitor, it's only a 14" one, and takes room away from the browser. Bad idea to implement on small notebooks, Unity is better for widescreens. 

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 21 March 2015 - 03:32 AM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#12 NickAu

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Posted 21 March 2015 - 03:45 AM

In 12.04, you can go to System Settings > Appearance > Behavior and turn on autohide, then turn the sensitivity all the way down. Now the launcher will only show when you press Super.


Edited by NickAu, 21 March 2015 - 03:47 AM.


#13 mremski

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Posted 21 March 2015 - 12:12 PM

heyyou:

 

man -k <topic>

or 

whatis <topic> 

 

from a terminal will give you commands that pertain to your topic.  It's not a very smart match sometimes, but it should give a starting point. 

Also a browser, search "linux <topic>" will usually give you enough to keep you busy for a bit.


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#14 cat1092

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Posted 22 March 2015 - 02:33 AM

In 12.04, you can go to System Settings > Appearance > Behavior and turn on autohide, then turn the sensitivity all the way down. Now the launcher will only show when you press Super.

 

That done the trick!  :thumbup2:

 

Now I can use the computer & see the whole page of the browser w/out having to slide the page to see that's on the right hand side. On computers with smaller monitors, real estate is precious. Seems that the devs at that time would have thought of this, as in 2010, there were still many of these notebooks with 14" screens in use as 'daily drivers', as well as netbooks with even smaller screens. Though by 2012, that number has lessened, netbooks were still selling quite well. 

 

Now it's like the one that was in existence before Unity came along!    

 

Cat                                                                                                             


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#15 K6567

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Posted 22 March 2015 - 02:12 PM

This is good news. Whenever I've installed Ubuntu for anyone I've always added the option for gnome classic. Surprisingly, even when I've added the classic menu indicator to

 

Unity many times they opt for just plain gnome classic. As for myself it's always been gnome-classic: upper panel - browser shortcuts & printer; lower panel - screen capture,

 

an editor, and kill-gnome: on desktop - nothing but the trash bin.  Nonetheless can't say Unity isn't pleasing to the eye.






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