Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

How do i know what processor is compatible with my motherboard?


  • Please log in to reply
10 replies to this topic

#1 TheBlueJacket

TheBlueJacket

  • Members
  • 5 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:04:03 AM

Posted 12 March 2015 - 12:13 PM

Hi, this is the computer I have.

http://h20564.www2.hp.com/hpsc/doc/public/display?docId=emr_na-c01328709

 

I want to upgrade my CPU but I don't know much about computers and which CPUs are compatible with my computer.

 

This is the CPU I've been looking at:

http://www.amazon.ca/Intel-Pentium-Processor-LGA775-BX80571E5500/dp/B003GSLDK4/ref=sr_1_6?s=pc&ie=UTF8&qid=1426178692&sr=1-6&keywords=intel+pentium

 

Will this one work with my computer?

Is it even worth upgrading?

Will my computer be significantly faster?

Do you reccomend any other CPUs?

 

Thanks for your help.


Edited by TheBlueJacket, 12 March 2015 - 12:13 PM.


BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 YeahBleeping

YeahBleeping

  • Members
  • 1,258 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:03:03 AM

Posted 12 March 2015 - 03:45 PM

The website information clearly states it supports up to dual core E4400 800mhz fsb.

 

Now that core you have chose May work because the fsb is still 800mhz but it may not because the board may not support the processor.  You may need a bios update for the processor to be properly detected.  But for 20 bux... I'd say you cant go wrong.  You aslo ask if it will be significantly faster... faster than what.. you do not state what you have in the machine currently.  You may see a performance increase and for a computer upgrade 20bux is a drop in the bucket to spend.  So its up to you.



#3 TheBlueJacket

TheBlueJacket
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 5 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:04:03 AM

Posted 12 March 2015 - 04:57 PM

The website information clearly states it supports up to dual core E4400 800mhz fsb.

 

Now that core you have chose May work because the fsb is still 800mhz but it may not because the board may not support the processor.  You may need a bios update for the processor to be properly detected.  But for 20 bux... I'd say you cant go wrong.  You aslo ask if it will be significantly faster... faster than what.. you do not state what you have in the machine currently.  You may see a performance increase and for a computer upgrade 20bux is a drop in the bucket to spend.  So its up to you.

 

Thanks

 

My current CPU is the E2160, it is a dual core with 1.8 ghz



#4 YeahBleeping

YeahBleeping

  • Members
  • 1,258 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:03:03 AM

Posted 12 March 2015 - 05:56 PM

Because neither of these technologies supports hyperthreading you may not ' see ' too much of a performance improvement.  Is it a faster core? yes.  But when you compare it to an i5 or an i7 that can automatically ' handle ' multiple ' calls ' to the processor, Than in this case your kinda beating a dead horse so to speak.  It may be better to upgrade a video card or to an SSD (solid state drive) to get the performance boost you are looking for.. 



#5 DJBPace07

DJBPace07

  • BC Advisor
  • 4,869 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:04:03 AM

Posted 13 March 2015 - 05:59 AM

According to that HP website, the follow CPU's are supported on that motherboard:

 

Socket type: 775

Motherboard supports the following processor upgrades:

Core 2 Duo E4x00 with Dual Core technology (Conroe) up to E4400
Pentium E2000 series (Conroe) up to E2160
Pentium D 9xx with Dual Core technology (Presler) up to 960
Pentium 4 6x1 series (Cedar Mill) up to 661
Celeron 4xx series up to 440
Celeron D 3xx series (Cedar Mill) up to 365
Celeron D 3xx series (Prescott) up to 355

 

Make sure what you buy is one of these processors, your motherboard BIOS may not be able to detect or use any other processor.  A more effective, and thus more expensive, upgrade would be to do a complete platform change away from the old LGA 775 and to a newer LGA 1150 or AM3+ platform.  This will open up newer CPU designs, but you would need to purchase a new motherboard and Windows license.  Given that you are wanting a fairly low-end processor, a platform upgrade may be overkill.


3939.png

 


#6 TheBlueJacket

TheBlueJacket
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 5 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:04:03 AM

Posted 13 March 2015 - 12:44 PM

Since the E5500 might not be campatible with my computer, is it worth upgrading to the E4400?

http://www.ebay.ca/itm/Intel-Core-2-Duo-E4400-HH80557PG0412M-SLA3F-SLA5F-SLA98-CPU-800-2-GHz-LGA-775-/131335775086?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item1e9438e36e

 

It has only 0.2 more ghz and 1 mb more cache than my current CPU (E2160), is that worth the upgrade?


Edited by TheBlueJacket, 13 March 2015 - 12:45 PM.


#7 YeahBleeping

YeahBleeping

  • Members
  • 1,258 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:03:03 AM

Posted 13 March 2015 - 03:21 PM

Honestly BlueJacket.. neither one of the suggested ' upgrades ' will be a huge imiprovement.  You may not even notice it.  Because the architecture is just not up to par with today's standards.  Upgrading to even an i5 would be a vast improvement to your current system.  You may just want to hold off and save up and build yourself an i5 or an AMD system.



#8 TheBlueJacket

TheBlueJacket
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 5 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:04:03 AM

Posted 14 March 2015 - 11:50 AM

Honestly BlueJacket.. neither one of the suggested ' upgrades ' will be a huge imiprovement.  You may not even notice it.  Because the architecture is just not up to par with today's standards.  Upgrading to even an i5 would be a vast improvement to your current system.  You may just want to hold off and save up and build yourself an i5 or an AMD system.

 

If I were to build an i5 or AMD, would I still keep my case, ram, hard drive and CD drive and change everything else?



#9 Serpius

Serpius

  • Banned
  • 121 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:04:03 AM

Posted 14 March 2015 - 07:37 PM

 

Honestly BlueJacket.. neither one of the suggested ' upgrades ' will be a huge imiprovement.  You may not even notice it.  Because the architecture is just not up to par with today's standards.  Upgrading to even an i5 would be a vast improvement to your current system.  You may just want to hold off and save up and build yourself an i5 or an AMD system.

 

If I were to build an i5 or AMD, would I still keep my case, ram, hard drive and CD drive and change everything else?

 

Yeah,

 

It depends on the case, but I will make the assumption that the case will take an ATX type of motherboard, then yes, you can re-use the case.

 

However, depending on what motherboard you get, you *may* be able to keep the hard drive and the CD drive because more than likely, both drives are IDE type, not the newer SATA drives. Saving the RAM is out of the question, period.

 

Depending on your budget, I might be able to work up something that would give you a good idea of a good computer build based on your budget.

 

I would definately refrain from buying a computer from a store.

Most computers found in stores are built with inferior computer components and you will not get your money's worth.



#10 TheBlueJacket

TheBlueJacket
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 5 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:04:03 AM

Posted 14 March 2015 - 09:28 PM

 

 

Honestly BlueJacket.. neither one of the suggested ' upgrades ' will be a huge imiprovement.  You may not even notice it.  Because the architecture is just not up to par with today's standards.  Upgrading to even an i5 would be a vast improvement to your current system.  You may just want to hold off and save up and build yourself an i5 or an AMD system.

 

If I were to build an i5 or AMD, would I still keep my case, ram, hard drive and CD drive and change everything else?

 

Yeah,

 

It depends on the case, but I will make the assumption that the case will take an ATX type of motherboard, then yes, you can re-use the case.

 

However, depending on what motherboard you get, you *may* be able to keep the hard drive and the CD drive because more than likely, both drives are IDE type, not the newer SATA drives. Saving the RAM is out of the question, period.

 

Depending on your budget, I might be able to work up something that would give you a good idea of a good computer build based on your budget.

 

I would definately refrain from buying a computer from a store.

Most computers found in stores are built with inferior computer components and you will not get your money's worth.

 

 

My budget is $300-450 Canadian. Out of curiosity, why is it not a good idea not to save the ram? is 2gb not enough?



#11 Serpius

Serpius

  • Banned
  • 121 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:04:03 AM

Posted 15 March 2015 - 02:57 AM



 



 



 



Honestly BlueJacket.. neither one of the suggested ' upgrades ' will be a huge imiprovement.  You may not even notice it.  Because the architecture is just not up to par with today's standards.  Upgrading to even an i5 would be a vast improvement to your current system.  You may just want to hold off and save up and build yourself an i5 or an AMD system.

 

If I were to build an i5 or AMD, would I still keep my case, ram, hard drive and CD drive and change everything else?

 

Yeah,

 

It depends on the case, but I will make the assumption that the case will take an ATX type of motherboard, then yes, you can re-use the case.

 

However, depending on what motherboard you get, you *may* be able to keep the hard drive and the CD drive because more than likely, both drives are IDE type, not the newer SATA drives. Saving the RAM is out of the question, period.

 

Depending on your budget, I might be able to work up something that would give you a good idea of a good computer build based on your budget.

 

I would definately refrain from buying a computer from a store.

Most computers found in stores are built with inferior computer components and you will not get your money's worth.

 

 

My budget is $300-450 Canadian. Out of curiosity, why is it not a good idea not to save the ram? is 2gb not enough?

 

 

Blue Jacket,

 

The RAM modules may not be compatible with the new motherboard.

Judging from your post, the computer sounds like it's pretty old in terms of computer technology. 

 

Here is my recommended computer build. It is $19 Canadian dollars over, but in the long term, this would be a great setup for future upgrades. 

In the future, you can even upgrade the processor all the way up to i7 processor. 

I have included a new SATA hard drive. It's rare nowadays to find a motherboard manufacturer that will use the legacy IDE in their motherboards. If you find out that your CD drive is an IDE type, you probably can find a SATA CD drive for around $20-$25 Canadian dollars.

 

 
Motherboard: MSI Z97 PC MATE ATX LGA1150 Motherboard  ($121.87 @ DirectCanada) 
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory  ($76.32 @ DirectCanada) 
Power Supply: CoolMax 500W ATX Power Supply  ($43.00 @ shopRBC) 
Total: $469.13
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2015-03-15 03:51 EDT-0400





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users