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So I volunteered to give IT help to a non-profitů


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#1 fiveleaf

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Posted 03 March 2015 - 09:33 PM

And they have some computer issues that result in their tight budget being eaten up by a brand-name tech service. I walked in earlier today to a couple of elderly women with no IT knowledge, and while I know that just about anything is going to be in the right direction, I wanted to run this by you guys as I'm just an average helpdesk tech & by no means a computer guru.

 

IT Resources:

-Working wifi modem/router.

-Two decent laptops, win7 x64, used by the primary caregivers as desktops.

-One newer desktop, win7 x64, "server". Sometimes used by randoms.

-One old desktop, winXP, for client use only.

 

The company's computer use:

Two primary caregivers with laptops, who only really use an internet browser, office, and a couple other programs. They needed to share files between the two laptops, so a nicer win7 server was created with a share drive that both laptops may access. It's actually a pretty nice machine with a sweet desk, and often sees use by the various facilitators that visit the facility.

The clients often do not have home internet to use, so the old XP machine is just left on as an admin for their use.

 

What I'm thinking (your opinions here please):

Work computers:

-Right now all users are admins. Disable for all computers. Explain proper admin use.

-Explain safe installing of programs & give office head admin password for future installing.

-Setup win7 workgroup with a share folder between the two laptops. Move server files here.

 

Client computers:

-Nuke & Pave server for client & random user use.

-Give the old XP machine a copy of Windows 7.

-To both of these machines, lower user privileges & follow a guide somewhere on how to setup a public access curtesy computer.

 

 

Suggestions?



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#2 NotAnElf

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Posted 04 March 2015 - 03:48 PM

Looks good to me. One thing I would also do if it was me is try and lock down who is using that server other than "randoms". Depending on how long you plan on staying in this role, I personally would change the credentials and give them them out on a need to know basis - taking note of everyone who has access to it.



#3 technonymous

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Posted 06 March 2015 - 02:39 AM

Yes, lockdown of the server so only chosen trusted few have access. Also create a password reset disk, restore disk, backup etc of everything. Go over the laptops as well to make sure there isn't anything goofy security issues going on. Lock down file shares on laptops. Since there is only one client machine just lock it down locally with administrator secpols no need for DC or server access. It does need to be upgraded to Windows 7. If the router is new you can place it on guest wifi or isolated vlan is that is supported and also control QOS bandwidth, blocked websites that way as well. You don't want that client anywhere near the office workgroup you want it off in it's litte DMZ world lol






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