Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Locking up even after reinstall. Hardware issues?


  • Please log in to reply
37 replies to this topic

#1 ug505

ug505

  • Members
  • 16 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:12:46 AM

Posted 01 March 2015 - 07:43 PM

Hello everyone,

 

Desktop with the problem: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16883227505

Speccy: http://speccy.piriform.com/results/7x8aiyMbpUrUq38y06miW5E

 

I'm new to the forums but I've been here many times finding relatable questions and solutions to my problems. However, I now have a problem I am unable to solve. For the past five days, my computer has been freezing/locking up randomly. I won't be able to move my mouse, use my keyboard, or ctrl + alt + del. Any sound playing will get stuck and "loop." The only way out is to hard boot. No specific event has been causing this to happen. I can be playing a game, on YouTube, idling at desktop, or simply talking on Skype. The freezing leaves no Event Logs in Event Viewer or any dump files. I'm not sure what is causing it, but I did do something right before this started happening. I updated my UEFI using "UEFI Internet Flash" that was in my UEFI menu. It updated my UEFI Firmware, which the only thing it added was "bug fixes."

 

Before the UEFI update, however, I have added hardware to my computer. I replaced 2 x 4GB memory sticks with new 2 x 8GB memory sticks and I added a new SSD last month with no problems up until now.

 

Since the lockups have been happening, I've been diagnosing. I automatically assumed hardware. I ran Memtest86+ overnight and had 4 passes and 0 errors. I installed CrystalDiskInfo and it told me my hard drives are fine. I ran Furmark to see if it was my GPU, it ran for an hour with no problems at all. But it eventually froze again, when I wasn't testing. I thought about my temperatures but my idle temperature for my CPU is 35C, my GPU is 53C, and my hard drives are around 30C (I do NOT overclock by the way.) I then decided to open the case up and clean out all the dust and make sure all cables were in nice and tight, just in case. It still crashed later. Then today I figured it could be a driver. I figured instead of guessing, I'll just reinstall my OS. So I did that, reinstalled all my drivers from my motherboard's website, reinstalled my graphics drivers from Nvidia, and just used my computer all day. Everything was going fine actually, it didn't crash for most of the day. But then about an hour ago, I got a BSOD. It showed a message and successfully made a dump, which I will include. The message was CLOCK_WATCHDOG_TIMEOUT, which from researching that error, means my CPU could possibly be going bad. I've gone from locking up to BSOD. I just want my computer to finally start working.

 

Edit: The dump was too large for me to upload, so I created an HTML report of the dump.

 

Update: I formatted my SSD and reinstalled my OS (Windows 8.1) using the disc my computer came with. The locking up problem still remains.

Attached Files


Edited by ug505, 01 March 2015 - 08:40 PM.


BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 zingo156

zingo156

  • BC Advisor
  • 3,333 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:11:46 PM

Posted 02 March 2015 - 10:50 AM

I would run something like HWmonitor to monitor the voltages and temperatures. My guess would be a potential PSU issue or a mainboard issue. It is quite rare for a cpu to have issues. If you do any over clocking, I would also try switching those back to whatever stock clocks were.

 

http://www.cpuid.com/softwares/hwmonitor.html

 

What you will be looking at is the 3.3 volt, 5 volt, and 12 volt, those should never be out of this range:

 

+3.3VDC ± 5% +3.135 VDC +3.465 VDC

+5VDC ± 5% +4.750 VDC +5.250 VDC

+5VSB ± 5% +4.750 VDC +5.250 VDC

-5VDC (if used) ± 10% -4.500 VDC -5.500VDC

+12VDC ± 5% +11.400 VDC +12.600 VDC

-12VDC ± 10% -10.800 VDC - 13.200 VDC


Edited by zingo156, 02 March 2015 - 10:51 AM.

If I am helping you with a problem and I have not responded within 48 hours please send me a PM.

#3 YeahBleeping

YeahBleeping

  • Members
  • 1,258 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:11:46 PM

Posted 02 March 2015 - 10:20 PM

A quick web search also stated that tools that read hardware data can cause these issues.  I would try uninstalling teamviwer uninstalling speedfan uninstalling speccy and any other tools that read hardware information.  That being said:

 

I think your SSD is going bad: (but I am no where near a Hard drive diagnostic pro) But I'm working on it.

 

C9
Attribute name: 
Uncorrectable Soft Read Error Rate
Real value: 
6,587,916
Current: 
120
Worst: 
120
Threshold: 
0
Raw Value: 
000064860C
Status: 
Good

 

I would download their SSD tools and check with them on the results.  Please be sure to come back and let us know.



#4 dc3

dc3

    Bleeping Treehugger


  • Members
  • 30,595 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sierra Foothills of Northern Ca.
  • Local time:09:46 PM

Posted 03 March 2015 - 11:56 AM

A quick web search also stated that tools that read hardware data can cause these issues.  I would try uninstalling teamviwer uninstalling speedfan uninstalling speccy and any other tools that read hardware information. 

Teamviewer I'm not familiar with, but Speedfan and Speccy are perfectly safe.  Speccy is suggested numerous times every day here at Bleeping Computer.  

 

I don't know where you found this information, but it is inaccurate.


Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#5 YeahBleeping

YeahBleeping

  • Members
  • 1,258 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:11:46 PM

Posted 03 March 2015 - 04:34 PM

 

A quick web search also stated that tools that read hardware data can cause these issues.  I would try uninstalling teamviwer uninstalling speedfan uninstalling speccy and any other tools that read hardware information. 

Teamviewer I'm not familiar with, but Speedfan and Speccy are perfectly safe.  Speccy is suggested numerous times every day here at Bleeping Computer.  

 

I don't know where you found this information, but it is inaccurate.

 

 

Thanks.. its not inaccurate if some people are actually reporting problems and removing the software resolves it.  It could be that UEFI is not playing nice.  Teamviwer is a remote desktop viewer people use to ' take control ' of anothers computer I am sure that if you had done a quick web search on the error you would have found the ' reports yourself ' I am not saying that the programs are bad.. I am saying that it has been reported that the programs that read real time hardware data have been reported as causing the error clock_watchdog_timeout the OP reported.

 

Along with posting your views about my post you could have posted some helpful information on what ' you think ' could help him.



#6 ug505

ug505
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 16 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:12:46 AM

Posted 03 March 2015 - 07:25 PM

I would run something like HWmonitor to monitor the voltages and temperatures. My guess would be a potential PSU issue or a mainboard issue. It is quite rare for a cpu to have issues. If you do any over clocking, I would also try switching those back to whatever stock clocks were.

 

http://www.cpuid.com/softwares/hwmonitor.html

 

What you will be looking at is the 3.3 volt, 5 volt, and 12 volt, those should never be out of this range:

 

+3.3VDC ± 5% +3.135 VDC +3.465 VDC

+5VDC ± 5% +4.750 VDC +5.250 VDC

+5VSB ± 5% +4.750 VDC +5.250 VDC

-5VDC (if used) ± 10% -4.500 VDC -5.500VDC

+12VDC ± 5% +11.400 VDC +12.600 VDC

-12VDC ± 10% -10.800 VDC - 13.200 VDC

 

I'm not really sure what to look for in the voltages. I've never really looked at my voltages before. I also don't overclock any of my hardware, so it is all at stock. I saved my HWMonitor data to a text file though. Temperatures are very normal: http://pastebin.com/pEVhiD5F

A quick web search also stated that tools that read hardware data can cause these issues.  I would try uninstalling teamviwer uninstalling speedfan uninstalling speccy and any other tools that read hardware information.  That being said:

 

I think your SSD is going bad: (but I am no where near a Hard drive diagnostic pro) But I'm working on it.

 

C9
Attribute name: 
Uncorrectable Soft Read Error Rate
Real value: 
6,587,916
Current: 
120
Worst: 
120
Threshold: 
0
Raw Value: 
000064860C
Status: 
Good

 

I would download their SSD tools and check with them on the results.  Please be sure to come back and let us know.

The thing is, the locking up happens with or without that software installed. As mentioned before, I formatted my SSD and reinstalled my OS. Before installing any of the software you mentioned, it was still locking up. So I highly doubt it's that. As for my SSD, I've only had it for a month. I ran a diagnostic scan and nothing was reported. The drive health is full (good) and the estimated lifetime is at 100%.



#7 zingo156

zingo156

  • BC Advisor
  • 3,333 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:11:46 PM

Posted 04 March 2015 - 08:22 AM

I'm not really sure what to look for in the voltages. I've never really looked at my voltages before. I also don't overclock any of my hardware, so it is all at stock. I saved my HWMonitor data to a text file though. Temperatures are very normal: http://pastebin.com/pEVhiD5F

 

I am not certain how to read those new logs, the older versions used to list all of the data, it was still tricky to read but I could do it. I guess the next best thing would be to let HWmonitor run and then take a screen shot using PrtScn or the snipping function in windows. Then post that here. You may have to upload it to a dropbox or picture upload site and post that url here. I did not see anything strange in speccy, temps look good etc.

 

I would also try to run who crashed, maybe there is more info there:

 

We need to analyze your operating system's crash dump files to further diagnose what could possibly be crashing your computer system.

Please download Who Crashed? and save it to your desktop.

Double click whocrashedSetup.exe and choose Run

On Windows Vista, 7, 8 and 8.1 machines, when User Account Control asks if you wish to install this program, say YES to install the program on your computer.

Program can also be installed by right click and choosing Run As An Administrator.

On the next screen choose Next and accept the agreement.

Install the program in it's default location C:\Program Files\WhoCrashed (If your primary drive is different from C:, choose your primary drive.)

Choose Next and allow program to create a Start Menu Folder called WhoCrashed and click Next.

Allow program to create desktop icon and click Next.

Now Click Install.

Once the program is installed on your computer system, look for the WhoCrashed icon.png desktop Icon and double click it.

Accept the User Account Control request and the program will open on your screen and should look something like this.

whocrashed.png

Next, Click the Analyze button. analyze.png

An Information Window should appear on your screen prompting you to scroll down your screen.

If a report was generated we would like to have a look at this report.

To do this, click File analyze.png and then choose Export.

Save as WhoCrashedOutput.htm to your desktop.

Open WhoCrashedOutput.htm and copy and paste all of the contents from System Information (local) and Crash Dump Analysis and the Conclusion into your next reply.
 


If I am helping you with a problem and I have not responded within 48 hours please send me a PM.

#8 dc3

dc3

    Bleeping Treehugger


  • Members
  • 30,595 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sierra Foothills of Northern Ca.
  • Local time:09:46 PM

Posted 04 March 2015 - 09:08 AM

If you want to read the rail voltages so see if they fall within normal parameters, use the instructions below.

 

 
Reading and Testing Desktop PSU Rail Voltages
 
Caution: Please read the following before continuing.
 
 
* Since it will be necessary for your computer to be on during this procedure, you need to be aware that you will be working with live 12Volt DC potentials, which if handled improperly may lead to electrical shock. 
 
* There are electronics inside the case that are very susceptible to electrostatic discharges. To protect your computer, touch the metal of the case to discharge yourself of any electrostatic charges before touching any of the components inside.
 
* If you are not comfortable doing this procedure, then I would suggest that you not use this tutorial. The risks involved are minimal, but are there nevertheless. Anyone who uses this tutorial will be doing so at their own risk.
 
 
There are two devices commonly used to read the rail voltages: a PSU tester, and a multimeter. 
 
The PSU tester is the easiest to use since all that is necessary is to plug the different connectors into the tester and read the results on the LCD display. The problem with most of these is that they only perform a pass/fail test.  They will not provide you with actual voltage readings.
 
There are a variety of multiple meters, but this tutorial will address Analog and Digital multimeters. The advantage of these meters is that you will be able to obtain accurate real time voltage readings.
 
For those of you who wish to know more about multimeters there is an excellent article in Wikipedia.
 
 
Analog Multimeter
 
th_analogedited.jpg
 
 
An Analog multimeter is a little more complicated to use. Both Analog and Digital multimeters need to be set to the appropriate voltage, but with an Analog multimeter, you will need to choose the voltage range and must read the proper scale. 
 
The Analog multimeter uses a needle display which moves from 0 across the scale until it reaches the voltage being tested. This multimeter has five major linear divisions with multiple scales to read a variety of ranges. An example would be three different ranges. The first is graduated in increments of 0 through 5, the second, 0 through 10, and the third, 0 through 25. Each of these ranges are subdivided into divisions that are graduated into tenths. In order to read 12 volts the 0 through 25 range would be the appropriate one. 
 
Because DC voltage has positive and negative potentials this device is polar sensitive, this means that if you reverse the two probes when reading a positive DC voltage it will read as a negative voltage. This is actually necessary to read negative DC voltages. The two probes are differentiated by their color, Black (negative), and Red (positive). To read a positive DC voltage, the correct probes must be used with their corresponding potentials (positive to positive and negative to negative). 
 
With the probes being used normally to read a negative DC voltage, the needle moves from the 0 to the left, "pegging" the needle. By reversing the probes you can properly read the negative voltages.
 
Digital Multimeter
 
th_digitalmeteredited.jpg
 
 
The Digital multimeter (DMM) is much simpler to use. As was mentioned previously, you will need to set the appropriate voltage. One of the advantages is that the DMM has an LCD display with a numeric readout, so there are not any multiple scales to read. Another advantage is that most DMMs are autoranging when reading voltages, which means that you will not need to set the range with these DMMs. A DMM will read both positive and negative DC voltages and display them correctly. When reading a negative voltage, a minus sign will appear on the display before the numeric value. This still is a polar sensitive device, so you will still need to use the positive and negative probes with their corresponding potentials. 
 
There are five different DC rail voltages which are color coded. The Black wires are always negative.
 
Yellow +12VDC
 
Blue -12VDC
 
Red +5VDC
 
White -5VDC
 
Orange +3.3VDC
 
There are only three voltages that can be measured easily without disconnecting the 20/24 pin connector from the motherboard: +12V, +5V, and +3.3V.
 
The +12V and +5V voltages can be read from a four pin Molex power connector.
 
Four pin Molex power connector
 
th_250px-Molex_female_connector.jpg
 
 
The same voltages can be taken from a four pin SATA power connector, but in order to read the +3.3V you will need to read this from a five pin SATA power connector as seen below.
 
Five pin SATA power connector.
 
th_sata-power-cable.jpg
 
To read these voltages you will need to insert the Black (-) probe into any of the black  sockets, and insert the Red (+) probe in the different colored voltage sockets.   To read the voltages from a SATA power connector it is easiest to insert the probes into the bac k of the connector where the wires enter.  Unfortunately the sockets of the modular SATA power connectors are not accessible from the back, so the readings will need to be made from the socket side.  Some probes are going to be too large to fit in these sockets, so you may need to insert a piece of wire into the socket of which you want to read the voltage of and place the probe on this for your reading.  To reduce the potential of creating a short I would suggest taking the ground potential from another connector so that the two wires will remain physically separated.
 
Caution:  It is very important to make sure that you don't allow the two probes to touch each other when taking the voltage readings.  This will cause a short which could damage the PSU or other components.
 
To get accurate readings of the rail voltages it is important that there be a load on the PSU. In order to do this I would suggest downloading Prime95 and run the Just Stress Test for this purpose. This program was designed to be used by overclockers to put a full load on the RAM and CPU to determine the stability of their overclocking.  Because of this it will put stress on the CPU and RAM which will create higher than normal temperatures.  For this reason I would suggest not running this program any longer than is necessary.  I would also suggest that an inspection be made of the interior of the case to make sure that there isn’t an accumulation of dust which would impede adequate cooling.  Pay special attention to the heat sink and fan assembly on the CPU.  If there is a dedicated graphics card with a fan installed on it, look at this fan as well.      
 
 
Readings should not have variances larger than +/- five percent.  
 
Maximum.........Minimum
12.6V.................11.4V
5.25V.................4.75V
3.47V.................3.14V

Edited by dc3, 04 March 2015 - 09:10 AM.

Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#9 ug505

ug505
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 16 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:12:46 AM

Posted 06 March 2015 - 12:57 PM

Sorry my response took so long, college is keeping me busy.

 

I believe the problem is my SSD, but I'm not 100% sure. I ran Ubuntu on a Live USB yesterday and left my computer on all night. I came back today and the computer is still on and hasn't crashed. (I'm on the forums with it right now as well.) Usually it would've crashed by now, so I have a strong feeling it would be my SSD. What could be causing this? Is my SSD defective? Or is it just dying after only a month? I didn't write anything to it besides Windows 8.1 and drivers. I even moved my temp data folder and pagefile to my HDD to keep writing at a minimum.

 

If needed, here's the SSD that I bought: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820211595&cm_re=adata_60gb_ssd-_-20-211-595-_-Product



#10 zingo156

zingo156

  • BC Advisor
  • 3,333 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:11:46 PM

Posted 06 March 2015 - 01:40 PM

Any piece of hardware can cause crashes, no posts, hangs, etc. If you have a spare hard drive, you could try loading windows on that and see if your computer continues to have issues, you might also consider safe mode. One thing about Linux vs Windows: they act differently with hardware issues. Linux will often work fine with a hard drive or stick of ram that has an issue, while windows might have BSOD or hang etc.


Edited by zingo156, 06 March 2015 - 01:41 PM.

If I am helping you with a problem and I have not responded within 48 hours please send me a PM.

#11 RolandJS

RolandJS

  • Members
  • 4,525 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Austin TX metro area
  • Local time:11:46 PM

Posted 06 March 2015 - 02:11 PM

dc3, I think HDW/SW monitoring programs can be problematic if/when too assertively set.  I've had to dial back on some of my earlier monitoring.  Now, with less assertive monitoring, things appear to be working smoothly most of the time. 


"Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee."  -- Ben Franklin revisited.

http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forums/45/Computer-Technologies/

Backup, backup, backup! -- Lady Fitzgerald (w7forums)

Clone or Image often! Backup... -- RockE (WSL)


#12 YeahBleeping

YeahBleeping

  • Members
  • 1,258 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:11:46 PM

Posted 06 March 2015 - 06:14 PM

I eluded to your SSD when I posted the first time as you have over 6 million uncorrectable soft read errors  I even copied and pasted the the speccy info for you.  Just because the info says: status ' good ' on it doesn't mean its good.  I suggest you contact Adata .. use their tools I provided a link to for you and find out if this drive is defective.

 

You can also try replacing the data cable to the SSD.  Or try the SSD in a known working good computer and see if it still throws out more errors in the same following SMART entries: THIS INFO TAKEN FROM YOUR SPECCY

 

C3
Attribute name: 
On the fly ECC Uncorrectable Error Count
Real value: 
6,587,916
Current: 
120
Worst: 
120
Threshold: 
0
Raw Value: 
000064860C
 
C9
Attribute name: 
Uncorrectable Soft Read Error Rate
Real value: 
6,587,916
Current: 
120
Worst: 
120
Threshold: 
0
Raw Value: 
000064860C
 
CC
Attribute name: 
Soft ECC Correction Rate
Real value: 
6,587,916
Current: 
120
Worst: 
120
Threshold: 
0
Raw Value: 
000064860C


#13 ug505

ug505
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 16 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:12:46 AM

Posted 09 March 2015 - 01:40 AM

 

I eluded to your SSD when I posted the first time as you have over 6 million uncorrectable soft read errors  I even copied and pasted the the speccy info for you.  Just because the info says: status ' good ' on it doesn't mean its good.  I suggest you contact Adata .. use their tools I provided a link to for you and find out if this drive is defective.

 

You can also try replacing the data cable to the SSD.  Or try the SSD in a known working good computer and see if it still throws out more errors in the same following SMART entries: THIS INFO TAKEN FROM YOUR SPECCY

 

So, I installed my OS to my HDD after unplugging my SSD from my system. The crashes still remain. I replaced my 2 x 8GB RAM cards with my old 2 x 4GB RAM cards. Haven't crashed in a couple of hours. Since the crash was still happening after removal of my SSD, I don't think it's my SSD anymore. Could be my new RAM cards. Both sets have the same voltage (1.5V per card.)



#14 zingo156

zingo156

  • BC Advisor
  • 3,333 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:11:46 PM

Posted 09 March 2015 - 07:02 AM

It very well could be a bad stick of ram. Anytime ram is replaced I recommend running memtest86+ to test for errors. I generally run it over night on new builds. IMO 3 passes is generally enough to catch most issues. You can get that at the link below, just download one of the versions and either burn to a disc or use their usb bootable version.

 

http://www.memtest.org/#downiso

 

Use the new version: ** Memtest86+ V5.01 (27/09/2013)**


If I am helping you with a problem and I have not responded within 48 hours please send me a PM.

#15 ug505

ug505
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 16 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:12:46 AM

Posted 09 March 2015 - 12:58 PM

It very well could be a bad stick of ram. Anytime ram is replaced I recommend running memtest86+ to test for errors. I generally run it over night on new builds. IMO 3 passes is generally enough to catch most issues.

Yes, but as said in my initial post, I ran Memtest86+ over night and had 4 passes and 0 errors.






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users