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recovery disk D


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#1 davmac848

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Posted 27 February 2015 - 07:54 PM

recoveryD says full, but no files to empty? What's wrong?



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#2 technonymous

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Posted 27 February 2015 - 09:06 PM

Maybe you can provide more information? Is this a laptop or a desktop? What size is D drive? Is it a factory recovery partition? Typically on a laptop the recovery partition is 8-12GB in size and is only intended to store the factory image. Nothing else should be stored there. If you created the partition yourself you have to understand that Microsoft backups are not compressed. It can quickly take up space. This is one of the main reason people use a 3rd party software to create backups such as Acronis True Image. Some info to give you an idea of what might be happening in your case...http://support.hp.com/us-en/document/c01508532


Edited by technonymous, 27 February 2015 - 09:07 PM.


#3 davmac848

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Posted 28 February 2015 - 11:10 AM

This is a desktop. The disk D is 10GB. Been using this computer for a couple of years with no problem. Now I get popup saying low recovery space. When I click on diskD, there are several files there, but all are empty except one with 1KB used. Are there hidden files I don't see? Can I move everything to disk C? Thanks



#4 Queen-Evie

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Posted 28 February 2015 - 01:39 PM

Yes, there are probably hidden files and folders on your D recovery drive.

To find out, open up Windows Explorer. (You can click on My Computer to do this).

 

If you see TOOLS in the toolbar, click Tools/Folder Options/View.

Under Advanced Settings/Hidden Files and Folders, UNCHECK Don't show hidden files, folders or drives AND Hide protected operating system files (recommended).

 

When asked if you are sure you want to unhide, say YES.

 

Click APPLY, then OK.

 

After you see the hidden files and folders, reverse the process to hide them again.

 

I will say that you should not mess with the recovery drive and start deleting things from it. This contains everything you need to re-install your operating system should that be necessary.

 

There are options you can use if it gets corrupted or removed but those can be mentioned later (unless someone else wants to mention them)

 

IF YOU DO NOT SEE TOOLS IN THE MENU AT THE TOP OF THE PAGE:

Click the drop down arrow next to ORGANIZE.

 

Choose Layout, then click Menu Bar. This will add the menu bar. Tools will one of the items listed in it.


Edited by Queen-Evie, 28 February 2015 - 01:41 PM.


#5 davmac848

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Posted 28 February 2015 - 04:27 PM

thank you Queen-evie, but I can't seem to find any files and recoveryD is full, I give up, but thanks anyway






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