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FCC adopts net neutrality rules to ban Internet discrimination


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#1 buddy215

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Posted 26 February 2015 - 01:38 PM

SOURCE: FCC adopts net neutrality rules to ban Internet discrimination - Yahoo Finance

 

By Aaron Pressman 21 minutes ago
 
Federal regulators moved forward on Thursday with a net neutrality plan to protect openness on the Internet by treating the online world more like heavily regulated telecommunications markets.
 
New rules from the Federal Communications Commission adopted on a 3-2 vote will prohibit Internet service providers like Comcast (CMCSA) and Verizon Communications (VZ) from discriminating against any web site or online service. That means sites like Netflix (NFLX) or Google’s (GOOGL) YouTube won’t have to pay extra fees or face sluggish connections with their users. And new sites and services will be able to reach everyone on the Internet on the same terms as the big players.
 
More info in source link above....
 
 
net-neutrality-comic.jpg

Edited by buddy215, 26 February 2015 - 01:46 PM.

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#2 quietman7

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Posted 26 February 2015 - 07:31 PM

These were the rules the FCC Chairman said we couldn't read until they passed them. That sounds like something a Congress person would say.

The U.S. Court of Appeals in D.C. ruled last year that the FCC did not have regulatory power over broadband. So what changed? To get around this ruling, the FCC decided it would treat ISPs as carriers under Title II of the Telecommunications Act...a law that regulates services as public utilities. Further...with additional hand picked judges now in place, the FCC now has a more friendly court should there be any legal challenges.
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#3 yu gnomi

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Posted 26 February 2015 - 08:32 PM

I may be alone, but I am actually more concerned about this than about the NSA malware stuff. I genuinely don't expect to be adversely affected by NSA snooping and mucking around in people's hardware.

 

FCC bureaucrats, on the other hand, might muck up things for everyone (or at least everyone in the U.S.) either because they don't know what they are doing, or because they are following some agenda and don't care if things get mucked-up.



#4 ddeerrff

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Posted 26 February 2015 - 08:56 PM

What happened to the Notice of Proposed Rule Making (NPRM)?  I though all agencies had to publish NPRM's and get the public's input before adapting new rules.  More unconstitutional overreach from the Obama administration?  <-- Political comment redacted.


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#5 quietman7

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Posted 26 February 2015 - 09:07 PM

What happened to the Notice of Proposed Rule Making (NPRM)?  I though all agencies had to publish NPRM's and get the public's input before adapting new rules.

 

 

"There ain’t no rules around here — we’re trying to accomplish something.’ And therefore, when the deal goes down, all this talk about rules, we make ‘em up as we go along..."
-- Spoken by a Congressman at a Rules Committee Hearing on March 20, 2010


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#6 zingo156

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Posted 27 February 2015 - 09:22 AM

I just hope that this prevents ISP's from over selling their lines. When I was in retail, we were a seller of cable for the local city. The company told us not to try to sell 100mb/s connections because they didn't "actually" have the means to support it all the time. Not only that but they also openly admitted to us they had oversold the majority of the lines.

 

What that means: during peak hours (which in this town happened to start when schools were let out ~3:30pm to 7pm), people's download speeds would sink from the 30mbps they paid for, to about 1-1.5mbps. In some cases it went to near dial up speeds. 

 

I do not mind paying $X for X speed, but if I pay for a speed, I expect to get it 24/7, I understand reasonable outages due to hardware/environmental issues.

 

Now I know that isn't the only component to net neutrallity: censorship, and forcing websites to pay extra for services are some of the other issues I was concerned about.

 

It seems that for certain websites will be treated fairly, I still wonder about getting full speed 24/7. I will have to do some reading, but I hope the FCC fights for the people and not the companies.

 

Has anyone followed "The worst business of the year" threads? Take a guess which ones mostly fill the top 1-3 positions?

 

If you don't want to guess: http://consumerist.com/2014/04/08/congratulations-to-comcast-your-2014-worst-company-in-america/

 

I can not vouche for how accurate those votes are... I would agree with some of the worst companies. I would have voted Verizon and Comcast a tie for worst of 2014.


Edited by zingo156, 27 February 2015 - 11:40 AM.

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#7 buddy215

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Posted 27 February 2015 - 10:20 AM

John Oliver gets a lot of the credit for waking up the consumers of broadband. In about 13 minutes of ranting his viewers for days overwhelmed the servers

at the FCC.

 

I have seen estimates as high as 99% of responders to the FCC's call for comments on Net Neutrality and proposed rules being for Net Neutrality.

 

I have read that nothing will change in the near future...maybe even years. There will be court challenges from Verizon, etc. and of course the Republicans

will attempt to pass some anti-consumer laws against the FCC's actions. Those Republican pols have to earn their pay....the moola they got from the

big ISPs.

 

You can view John Oliver's 13 minutes that shook up the users of the internet on YouTube. He does use some colorful language so those with tender ears

have been warned. ▶ Last Week Tonight with John Oliver: Net Neutrality (HBO) - YouTube


“Every atom in your body came from a star that exploded and the atoms in your left hand probably came from a different star than your right hand. It really is the most poetic thing I know about physics...you are all stardust.”Lawrence M. Krauss
A 1792 U.S. penny, designed in part by Thomas Jefferson and George Washington, reads “Liberty Parent of Science & Industry.”

#8 zingo156

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Posted 27 February 2015 - 11:21 AM


I have read that nothing will change in the near future...maybe even years. There will be court challenges from Verizon, etc. and of course the Republicans

will attempt to pass some anti-consumer laws against the FCC's actions. Those Republican pols have to earn their pay....the moola they got from the

big ISPs.

I agree, I doubt anything will change for quite some time. No doubt there will be some sort of work around to the FCC's new rules. If I recall correctly, Comcast spends the 2nd largest amount of money of any company in the U.S. for lobbying, they have some serious money to spend and are doing so. 
 

I'll watch that video later, thanks for posting it.


Edited by zingo156, 27 February 2015 - 11:22 AM.

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#9 quietman7

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Posted 27 February 2015 - 11:40 AM

The big companies may find workarounds, not so for the average person who will pay more and receive less.
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#10 zingo156

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Posted 27 February 2015 - 11:54 AM

The big companies may find workarounds, not so for the average person who will pay more and receive less.

Very true. I have a feeling with these new laws the consumer will end up paying more.


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#11 quietman7

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Posted 27 February 2015 - 02:36 PM

Young fool Only now, at the end, do you understand...When you see this document, its worse than you imagine,
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#12 zingo156

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Posted 27 February 2015 - 02:52 PM

LOL

 

Free Press flew an airplane towing a 2,000 square foot banner over the towering corporate headquarters of the cable giant Comcast, in Philadelphia.

The victory banner depicted the feline internet star Grumpy Cat and the legend: “Comcast: Don’t Mess With the Internet. #SorryNotSorry.”


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#13 buddy215

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Posted 27 February 2015 - 03:29 PM

I think the consumer really has to be selective as to where the consumer gets his information from. It's no secret that the ISPs and Republicans are in

bed together. It's no secret that much of what both say about how evil Net Neutrality is no where near accurate.

 

For instance, competition always assures the consumers they are not being ripped off by a monopoly. Net Neutrality will allow municipal governments that

now are prohibited by laws protecting the major ISPs monopolies to expand their service areas. My state is one that protects those ISPs from competition.

 

As far as the claim of the billions in new taxes.....What You Need To Know About Tomorrow’s Votes On Net Neutrality And Municipal Broadband – Consumerist

QUOTE: Your internet bill probably will go up this year (sorry), but it has absolutely nothing to do with net neutrality. That’s just because there’s no competition in most markets and ISPs will soak you for every penny they can.

Your ISP could absolutely start charging you more after the FCC rule change. But — and this is really important — they already do exactly that anyway and have done so for many years. The main driver of internet price increases is not government policy, but rather the near-complete lack of competition. Prices go up because they can, and they go down when multiple businesses actually have to compete for subscribers.

The claim that reclassifying broadband services will generate $15 billion in new taxes and fees comes from a single report that has since been thoroughly debunked. States may be able to add certain narrow surcharges and fees, but there is a a federal law blocking taxation of the internet, period. And the author of that law has literally called the $15b claim “baloney.”

Additionally, the commission has explicitly stated that the new order “will not impose, suggest or authorize any new taxes or fees” on internet services.


“Every atom in your body came from a star that exploded and the atoms in your left hand probably came from a different star than your right hand. It really is the most poetic thing I know about physics...you are all stardust.”Lawrence M. Krauss
A 1792 U.S. penny, designed in part by Thomas Jefferson and George Washington, reads “Liberty Parent of Science & Industry.”




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