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Can't Type....Is That Good?


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#1 Viking Drive

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Posted 25 February 2015 - 08:14 AM

Hi guys. Here's what's up. Back in school in the '80s I was falling behind in typing class big time. I played running back in football and from the first game on, my thumbs took some really bad abuse. They were always stubbed and swollen. It hindered my typing and I dropped out. Those were the days of Apple II and computers should have been my first choice for a career. Instead I got in construction and in my early forties, I realize, I can't physically manage it much longer and I want to learn to program instead. I'm hunting and pecking right now. Never learned still. 

 

OK my question for you starts with, can I turn this handicap into an advantage? To write code it isn't like trying to type a report. With the blocks of character strings and oddball partial words, symbols and expressions, it would appear that by now a typing style scaled for coding would have developed. I've read that the qwerty-style keyboard layout was made because in the days of mechanical typewriters, users would overrun the mechanical limits and the designers made it to slow typists down to prevent jamming! Facts like that make me wonder how the pros do it. To force user adaptation to a machine sounds counter-intuitive. Is there a streamlined approach to learn typing style strictly for code? Is one code in particular more user friendly for someone who starts out at a disadvantage? I'm open to recommendations. 



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#2 Netghost56

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Posted 25 February 2015 - 09:55 AM

I look at it as basic knowledge. Can you get by without writing on pen and paper? These days, most likely. But you will still run into situations where it's necessary.

 

QWERTY isn't the only keyboard style. There's also DVORAK and a few others. There are even keyboards that you can reprogram so that any key can be changed.

 

But I would still think it wise to develop the fundamentals of typing, without hunting and pecking. You'll find that everything computer based will be much easier to grasp and your experience will be much better for it.



#3 Viking Drive

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Posted 25 February 2015 - 10:43 AM

Thanks Netghost. I can understand that. This is something I've wondered about for awhile; not just whether typing is a necessary skill as much as spelling is to writing, but if there is a streamlined approach for learning typing that will make coding in particular more efficient. I know it would be more efficient to watch what's going on the screen and not my hands. Instead of writing a novel, I would prefer to write effective code. I'm finding good info searching the web on the relationship between typing skill and good coding now that I'm asking the right questions. I remember very little from typing class but so much has changed in the information environment. Is the classical way typists were being trained the most direct path? I'm not afraid to learn multiple languages and skill sets. Web authoring and control work/robotics is my interest .

 

In my first post above, this question would have been more clear: 

 

 

Is one language in particular more user friendly than others for someone who starts out as a slow typist?

 



#4 RolandJS

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Posted 25 February 2015 - 10:56 AM

You will very likely be forced to learn typing, I'm not sure companies will hire programmers who can only hunt and peck.  Too much money is at stake.  I hope the best for you!


Edited by RolandJS, 25 February 2015 - 09:00 PM.

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#5 JohnnyJammer

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Posted 25 February 2015 - 05:46 PM

I think the question should be "Which IDE would suit me"

And that would be Visual Studio, with intellisense. I think this would suit you more mate because it does half the work for you.

As you start typing a word/letter/function name/variable, intellisense will start offering you the rest and simply hitting TAB key will complete the command.



#6 Viking Drive

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Posted 26 February 2015 - 07:05 AM

Thanks Roland and JohnnyJammer. I appreciate the replies gentleman. This is very good advice and moral support. I'm looking into Visual Studio now. Haha. Not the kind of answer I expected but quite helpful stuff. I'm glad I posted this question here. It was time for me to make a commitment to learn to write programs and how to type, so that much is done. Good thing for auto-save as I just typed all that with all my fingers and deleted the text twice. lol Well it looked like, "Goos yhimg foof suti," a couple times but it's a first step. 



#7 JohnnyJammer

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Posted 27 February 2015 - 07:31 PM

No worries mate, im a 2 finger typer. Always have been since i started, i should learn touch typing but i manage to type as fast as most with just 2 fingers (60-70 words per minute) so when i am writitng software/scripting, depending on what ide i am writting in i take to debug because i always make spelling errors LOL.

 

VBS would be my worst as i simply use notepad for that, SCITE is a great IDE as well for scripting so is net beans mate.


Edited by JohnnyJammer, 27 February 2015 - 07:31 PM.


#8 RolandJS

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Posted 28 February 2015 - 11:47 AM

JohnnyJammer, if you already super-fast-2-finger type, then I guess you don't need typing course.  As long as you can effectively type while watching the monitor or laptop screen - you're in business.


"Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee."  -- Ben Franklin revisited.

http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forums/45/Computer-Technologies/

Backup, backup, backup! -- Lady Fitzgerald (w7forums)

Clone or Image often! Backup... -- RockE (WSL)


#9 Delta-V

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Posted 02 March 2015 - 03:02 PM

No worries mate, im a 2 finger typer. Always have been since i started, i should learn touch typing but i manage to type as fast as most with just 2 fingers (60-70 words per minute) so when i am writitng software/scripting, depending on what ide i am writting in i take to debug because i always make spelling errors LOL.

 

VBS would be my worst as i simply use notepad for that, SCITE is a great IDE as well for scripting so is net beans mate.

How is SCITE? I use Notepad++ myself for things that are not Java/C++(I use eclipse and codeblocks for those respectively)

Ya know if OP was to learn an IDE from scratch you are basically at square one and should consider VIM. :bowdown:



#10 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 02 March 2015 - 08:14 PM

My advice to most people in this situation is get hold of a good typing instructor CD - my favourite is 'Mavis Beacon' - and use that to improve your skills. I also suggest no more than 20 - 30 minutes a day as otherwise your brain starts oozing out of your ears. But use a good typing teacher  and after two or three weeks you will be amazed at the improvement in your typing.

 

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#11 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 08 March 2015 - 03:58 PM

No worries mate, im a 2 finger typer. Always have been since i started, i should learn touch typing but i manage to type as fast as most with just 2 fingers (60-70 words per minute) so when i am writitng software/scripting, depending on what ide i am writting in i take to debug because i always make spelling errors LOL.

 

VBS would be my worst as i simply use notepad for that, SCITE is a great IDE as well for scripting so is net beans mate.

 

 

I'm a two finger typer myself, about 45 to 55 WPM. Being a two finger typer has never been a professional hindrance.


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#12 JohnnyJammer

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Posted 08 March 2015 - 10:33 PM

 

No worries mate, im a 2 finger typer. Always have been since i started, i should learn touch typing but i manage to type as fast as most with just 2 fingers (60-70 words per minute) so when i am writitng software/scripting, depending on what ide i am writting in i take to debug because i always make spelling errors LOL.

 

VBS would be my worst as i simply use notepad for that, SCITE is a great IDE as well for scripting so is net beans mate.

How is SCITE? I use Notepad++ myself for things that are not Java/C++(I use eclipse and codeblocks for those respectively)

Ya know if OP was to learn an IDE from scratch you are basically at square one and should consider VIM. :bowdown:

 

 yeah scite is good mate, handles many languages (About 20). Notepad ++ is also a great handy tool as well.

It really comes down to what you need though hey!



#13 Viking Drive

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Posted 17 March 2015 - 07:14 AM

Thanks for the great advice guys!



#14 nbrazeau

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Posted 23 March 2015 - 11:47 AM

Knowing your IDE is more important than typing fast IMO. I myself am not fast, however I integrate as many shortcuts as possible within the IDE to make up for speed lacking while typing. IntelliJ is one of the best intellisense systems I have used, to each his or her own though...

Recently I started this typing software that is supposed to speed me up... I can only hit 40 wpm when I look at the screen, but my speed is faster than when I would have to scroll around fixing spelling errors for five min.

I try to keep my hand off the mouse as much as possible. Scrolling, and clicking around the IDE through directories, and now most menus are two or three mouse clicks away from what you need, when you can get it with [ctrl] + [alt] + [v]... or something like that..

So I say learn the IDE tricks first, and practice typing when you can if you feel like it would benefit you.






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