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SATA III connections.. connect to what?


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#1 frldyz

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Posted 25 February 2015 - 04:58 AM

Hello everyone.

 

I am new to the forum and new to the PC world.  I am currently buying all the components to do my 1st PC build.

My PC will be used mainly for basic home use.  Primarily store home pics/vids and music.

 

I currently am not a gamer, but do intend to play some gaming In the future. Hoever I do not anticipate being a hardcore gamer.

 

I am building my PC as future proof as possible.  I am buying components that are more then adequate for my needs.  But that's the fun of building.

 

-------------

 

I have a question about SATA III connections.

I recently purchased a Corsair PSU.  I don't have it in front of me, but I believe it is a CX750 and has 6 SATA III connections.

SATA III connections connect into.... (please correct me if I'm wrong)

1: my SSD

2.  my HDD (I do intend to run a raid o HDD).  Si with 2 HDDs in RAID O, that requires 2 SATA III connections?

3.  MY optical drive.  (If I choose to go with an internal).

4.  My card read ( If I go with an internal )

 

Does a SATA III connections plug into my liquid cooling unit?  I am looking into going with a Corsair 100i?  Or does that plug into my MOBO?

Does my graphics card plug into a SATA III connections?  Or does that plug into my MOBO

Case fans and internal fans:  My case has an exhaust and 2 intake fans.  I do intend to add some HDD fans.  What do all the fans connect into?

 

Thanks for reading and helping.



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#2 Kilroy

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Posted 25 February 2015 - 05:10 AM

SATA connectors coming off a power supply will go to SATA devices that require power they will not be data connections.  So, of the things you listed, everything except the card reader would use a PSU SATA connector, unless for some reason the card reader needed power.

 

I can't answer for the cooling unit, most likely it will use a molex connector, the old style hard drive connector, or it may connect to the motherboard.



#3 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 25 February 2015 - 08:12 AM

If your build is just for typical home usage, why are you going with liquid cooling? Shouldn't the stock cooler be good enough? I just built a home PC using the stock cooler, and even under a heavy load my CPU has never risen above 30 degrees Celsius, but it averages more like 26 degrees. Also, I don't think that a video card uses SATA power cords.


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#4 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 25 February 2015 - 08:13 AM

Oh yeah, one more thing. During my build, I really had to search for the proper place to plug in the fans, but they do plug into the motherboard. You can control the fan speed through your BIOS screen.


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#5 YeahBleeping

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Posted 25 February 2015 - 05:50 PM

Hello everyone.

 

I am new to the forum and new to the PC world.  I am currently buying all the components to do my 1st PC build.

My PC will be used mainly for basic home use.  Primarily store home pics/vids and music.

 

I currently am not a gamer, but do intend to play some gaming In the future. Hoever I do not anticipate being a hardcore gamer.

 

I am building my PC as future proof as possible.  I am buying components that are more then adequate for my needs.  But that's the fun of building.

 

-------------

 

I have a question about SATA III connections.

I recently purchased a Corsair PSU.  I don't have it in front of me, but I believe it is a CX750 and has 6 SATA III connections.

SATA III connections connect into.... (please correct me if I'm wrong)

 

1: my SSD

Yes Your SSD will use a SATA connector

 

2.  my HDD (I do intend to run a raid o HDD).  Si with 2 HDDs in RAID O, that requires 2 SATA III connections?

Yes your 2 HDDs will use 2 SATA connectors

 

3.  MY optical drive.  (If I choose to go with an internal).

Yes this drive normally has BOTH SATA AND the old style molex power connector only use one not both.

 

4.  My card read ( If I go with an internal )

Your card reader will normally get power from the Internal USB headers you connect it to so No this does not normally use a SATA connector.

 

Does a SATA III connections plug into my liquid cooling unit?  I am looking into going with a Corsair 100i?  Or does that plug into my MOBO?

Yes this cooling unit requires an SATA connector

 

Does my graphics card plug into a SATA III connections?  Or does that plug into my MOBO

If your graphics card (since you didn't list it I can't know for sure but normally they do not use SATA connectors they use the 4 pin molex.

 

Case fans and internal fans:  My case has an exhaust and 2 intake fans.  I do intend to add some HDD fans.  What do all the fans connect into?

Since you didnt specify your mobo it is hard to tell what options you have for powering your fans.  If your mobo has lots of fan headers, I would use them.

 

Thanks for reading and helping.

 

Good power supplies usually come with adapters for changing the old style molex 4 pllug into an SATA and vice versa you can also find them online and usually at a computer store.

 

You should have enough to power all your components.


Edited by hamluis, 01 April 2015 - 01:44 PM.


#6 GameMaster

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Posted 25 February 2015 - 07:46 PM

Hello frldyz,

 

Depending on what types of things you go with, they can go into different ports. I would specifically check with each component's specifications or their respective install guides.

 

Your case fans can plug into a motherboard, fan controller, or I think a PSU with adapters. Your CPU fan will plug into the motherboard. I can't speak for your hard drive's fans (not sure if you would even need those for an enthusiast system).

 

I am not sure which version of the H100i you are using, so it's difficult to help you with that. However, there may be some information around Corsair's website (I found some information for one of the coolers by checking the download section on Corsair's page for that specific product and finding a blog post). Also, I agree with what Rocky Bennett said:

 

If your build is just for typical home usage, why are you going with liquid cooling? Shouldn't the stock cooler be good enough? I just built a home PC using the stock cooler, and even under a heavy load my CPU has never risen above 30 degrees Celsius, but it averages more like 26 degrees. Also, I don't think that a video card uses SATA power cords.

 

From the cooling perspective, you shouldn't really need liquid cooling (unless of course, you're overclocking, then you would need to get someone else's opinion on that). I run an i5-4570 on the stock cooler and I game and sometimes do some 3D rendering (I use my GPU for computing the renders mostly, though. It's also not serious rendering going on).

 

Your graphics card could plug into your PSU, but it may not even need PCI-E connectors (some may need one or more). I would, again, check with the specific product you are buying (don't check with the AMD/Nvidia websites for this as some manufacturers may choose to change some things on the final product).



#7 merkez

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Posted 01 April 2015 - 01:00 PM

frldyz, it is important that you see the components and the connectors physically before trying to build a home PC. It is fairly simple once you get the components, for example, all the SATA connectors will directly be connected to the main board. Motherboard can supply power to almost all of your peripherals. Since it is just a home PC, you don’t need to worry about cooling the system. 



#8 GameMaster

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Posted 03 April 2015 - 11:42 AM

Merkez,

 

I'm not sure if I would say that you don't need to worry about it. Cooling can be very important. For example, running a CPU without a cooler on top of it could be disastrous.



#9 hamluis

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Posted 29 June 2015 - 05:14 PM

Agreed...I think he meant that liquid-cooling is probably not necessary on a home system where gaming is not the priority.

 

And...the power comes from the PSU, not the motherboard.  The motherboard gets its power from the PSU and then merely transfers a portion to USB and other less-important (lights, etc.) functions.

 

Louis






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