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Do You Prefer Sudo Or Root?


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Poll: Do You Prefer Sudo Or Root For Elevated Tasks? (7 member(s) have cast votes)

Do You Prefer Sudo Or Root For Elevated Tasks?

  1. Sudo (3 votes [42.86%])

    Percentage of vote: 42.86%

  2. For some tasks I prefer Sudo, and for some I prefer Root (3 votes [42.86%])

    Percentage of vote: 42.86%

  3. Voted Root (1 votes [14.29%])

    Percentage of vote: 14.29%

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#1 Guest_hollowface_*

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Posted 23 February 2015 - 01:11 AM

On some Linux distros you use the Root account to perform tasks that require elevated permissions, but on others the Root account is disabled and Sudo is used instead. Which method do you prefer?

 

Personally I prefer the Root way. Sudo can be useful, but I find using Root is easier. For example, earlier today I posted about installing XAMPP on Lubuntu. If you use Root (or at least simulate it with sudo -i) their are no issues, but if you use Sudo and don't change XAMPP's installation settings you end up with a botched Mozilla Firefox profile if you haven't previously setup a Mozilla Firefox profile under that user account. Deleting the profile won't fix it, nor will uninstalling Mozilla Firefox (even if you use sudo apt-get purge firefox). This isn't totally Sudo's fault; it's a bit silly that XAMPP opens an elevated browser without at least warning you, but still. I find sudo usually complicates my day rather than simplifies it, and that is why I prefer using Root.



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#2 NickAu

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Posted 23 February 2015 - 02:38 AM

I quite often use Puppy Linux so its root.  In Ubuntu it depends, Most of the time sudo.



#3 Al1000

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Posted 24 February 2015 - 12:13 PM

One of the first things I did when I installed Debian was to set up sudo because I'm used to it being there.

I mostly use sudo, and occasionally use root if whatever I've doing would otherwise involve typing lots of sudo commands.

Edited by Al1000, 24 February 2015 - 12:14 PM.


#4 Guest_hollowface_*

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Posted 26 February 2015 - 02:21 AM

One of the first things I did when I installed Debian was to set up sudo because I'm used to it being there.

 

Sometimes I'll type a command with Sudo on a VM, get a message telling me the user isn't in the Sudo group, and then remember I'm not on the right VM for that.



#5 NickAu

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Posted 26 February 2015 - 02:25 AM


 

Sometimes I'll type a command with Sudo on a VM, get a message telling me the user isn't in the Sudo group, and then remember I'm not on the right VM for that.

I did that in VM also launched cmd and typed sudo ufw before I realised it was Windows7 Home Premium. :smash:



#6 Al1000

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Posted 26 February 2015 - 02:37 AM

Sometimes I'll type a command with Sudo on a VM, get a message telling me the user isn't in the Sudo group, and then remember I'm not on the right VM for that.


When I installed Debian and tried to use sudo, I got a message saying that since I'm not on the sudoers list, the incident will be reported.

Now I'll need to log in as root, find the report, and send myself a message telling me not to do it again!




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