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Taking The Plunge


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#1 MelissaPleases

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Posted 22 February 2015 - 04:17 AM

I have a total of four computers, three of which are basically just for use of the kids, or guests. I've been playing around for some months now with Linux Mint, and I'd like to set up my primary computer as a dual boot system. While I can find a lot of info on doing this out on the web, I still prefer to get my advice and step-by-step instructions from the people here, because I've never once been let down here.

 

So, the questions:

 

I use Adobe Dreamweaver, Premiere Pro, and Photoshop extensively. Though I prefer to write HTML in Notepad++ I still find Dreamweaver to be useful. This is the main reason that I want to run a dual boot system - I prefer to stay with my (bought and dearly paid for) Adobe products for the tasks I use them for. I assume, unless something has changed, that Adobe products are still not supported in Linux?

 

My system drive is a 1TB drive, of which at this point, even with all of the software that I use, still has approximately 930GB of free space. Is it best to put both Windows and Mint on the same drive? Or should I install Mint on a different drive - I have several available.

 

Finally, if anyone can lay out a sort of step-by-step tutorial for me on setting up a dual boot system, I would be quite grateful. I'm comfortable with Mint now, and I'm ready to start making the break away from Windows and Microsucks. As much as I can, anyway - there are still some things I'll need Win 7 for, but I'm ready to reduce my dependence on it now.

 

Any help and advice will be appreciated, as well as any considerations that I may not of thought of.

 

TIA!! :)


Edited by MelissaPleases, 22 February 2015 - 04:18 AM.

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#2 NickAu

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Posted 22 February 2015 - 04:42 AM

Hi MelissaPleases

 

 

 

Or should I install Mint on a different drive - I have several available.

 

How comfortable are you  playing with partitioning tools on your main drive? The one with Windows on it.

 

 A different drive might be a good idea.


Edited by NickAu, 22 February 2015 - 04:44 AM.


#3 MelissaPleases

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Posted 22 February 2015 - 09:38 PM

I do a daily full backup of my system drive using Macrium Reflect, so even if worst came to worst, I can always restore to my present state. I'm comfortable using Partition Magic, unless there is a better alternative?


Edited by MelissaPleases, 22 February 2015 - 09:39 PM.

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#4 bitesized1612

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Posted 22 February 2015 - 11:31 PM

There is WINE (Windows Layer Emulator) that can run some older/newer Windows programs, you could run a VirtualBox on top of the base operating system you prefer if you have enough overall system resources, for example installing Mint and then running Windows 7 in the Box. If you're still in the distro shopping phase there are specific ones that can be installed and used on a flash drive instead of your hard drive so you don't have to mess up your settings. 

 

I had the Mint 13 MATE edition installed on an laptop for a about 10 months and it was really great. I would have loved to put it on a better computer since it's old and kind of a lemon (it had Vista on it when it was brand new and didn't really run well even then) so I encourage you to take the plunge.  :lol: Which Mint did you try out? 



Windows 7 Professional SP1 (64-bit) // HP EliteBook 8460p = 2.50GHz + 8GB RAM 

 

AVAST! - Google Chrome & Mozilla Firefox - LibreOffice - Rainmeter

 

Currently Testing: Linux Mint 17.3 XFCE on a Dell Inspiron 531 (2.1Ghz +3GB RAM)

Status: steady with some minor issues


#5 NickAu

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Posted 23 February 2015 - 02:48 AM

Hi MelissaPleases

 

I'm comfortable using Partition Magic,

That's fine I have never used it so somebody who has will jump in and guide you.  I suggest you create a 30GiB partition.

 

 

http://www.everydaylinuxuser.com/2014/07/how-to-install-linux-mint-alongside.html

 

Or you may like some other option

19 Ways To Install Linux


Edited by NickAu, 23 February 2015 - 02:49 AM.


#6 NickAu

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Posted 23 February 2015 - 03:00 AM

 

If you're still in the distro shopping phase there are specific ones that can be installed and used on a flash drive instead of your hard drive so you don't have to mess up your settings

Indeed there are, And some of them are just as powerfull as the mainstream distros.

 

TahrPup is a great " Little " Linux that can run from CD USB as a Live or can be installed to usb stick.

 

 

Tahrpup uses Ubuntu 14.04 LTS Trusty Tahr packages and includes the bugfixes and improvements from the woof CE build system. It is compatible with Ubuntu 14.04 packages. The Linux kernel version is 3.14.20.

Explore the Tharpup folder at ibiblio or nluug for downloads (Try the PAE build first).


 

MelissaPleases

 

Try this one. 

tahr-6.0.2_PAE.iso 

http://ftp.nluug.nl/ftp/pub/os/Linux/distr/puppylinux/puppy-tahr/iso/tahrpup%20-6.0-CE/tahr-6.0.2_PAE.iso

 

You will need to burn the ISO to CD or USB and then set your PC to boot from CD or USB.  Puppy is also great on older machines as well as new machines.

 

I quite often boot puppy on my

Intel® Core i5 Processor 4460. MSI H81-P33 MB,  8GiB Ram.


Edited by NickAu, 23 February 2015 - 03:03 AM.


#7 shadow-warrior

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Posted 23 February 2015 - 08:57 PM

I would definetly keep your windows partition ...as Dreamweaver didnt work in WINE on Linux last time i tried...nor did quite a few other apps i relied on....WINE is improving  though....

 

You could also install Windows in Virtualbox on linux which may work better  using Dreamweaver / photoshop etc...

 

Gimp is similar to Photoshop but there really isnt anything close to Dreamweaver for Linux



#8 MelissaPleases

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Posted 24 February 2015 - 09:34 AM

There is WINE (Windows Layer Emulator) that can run some older/newer Windows programs, you could run a VirtualBox on top of the base operating system you prefer if you have enough overall system resources, for example installing Mint and then running Windows 7 in the Box. If you're still in the distro shopping phase there are specific ones that can be installed and used on a flash drive instead of your hard drive so you don't have to mess up your settings. 

 

I had the Mint 13 MATE edition installed on an laptop for a about 10 months and it was really great. I would have loved to put it on a better computer since it's old and kind of a lemon (it had Vista on it when it was brand new and didn't really run well even then) so I encourage you to take the plunge.  :lol: Which Mint did you try out? 

 

I've been playing with Mint Cinnamon, which is probably why I found it comfortable to use so quickly - it bears a lot of striking similarities to Windows 7 in terms of the GUI.

 

 

 

If you're still in the distro shopping phase there are specific ones that can be installed and used on a flash drive instead of your hard drive so you don't have to mess up your settings

Indeed there are, And some of them are just as powerfull as the mainstream distros.

 

TahrPup is a great " Little " Linux that can run from CD USB as a Live or can be installed to usb stick.

 

 

Tahrpup uses Ubuntu 14.04 LTS Trusty Tahr packages and includes the bugfixes and improvements from the woof CE build system. It is compatible with Ubuntu 14.04 packages. The Linux kernel version is 3.14.20.

Explore the Tharpup folder at ibiblio or nluug for downloads (Try the PAE build first).


 

MelissaPleases

 

Try this one. 

tahr-6.0.2_PAE.iso 

http://ftp.nluug.nl/ftp/pub/os/Linux/distr/puppylinux/puppy-tahr/iso/tahrpup%20-6.0-CE/tahr-6.0.2_PAE.iso

 

You will need to burn the ISO to CD or USB and then set your PC to boot from CD or USB.  Puppy is also great on older machines as well as new machines.

 

I quite often boot puppy on my

Intel® Core i5 Processor 4460. MSI H81-P33 MB,  8GiB Ram.

 

 

I honestly think I'd prefer to do a separate partition on the main drive - I have far more than enough usable space, so it really makes sense to just have Windows and Linux installed on the same drive.

 

I would definetly keep your windows partition ...as Dreamweaver didnt work in WINE on Linux last time i tried...nor did quite a few other apps i relied on....WINE is improving  though....

 

You could also install Windows in Virtualbox on linux which may work better  using Dreamweaver / photoshop etc...

 

Gimp is similar to Photoshop but there really isnt anything close to Dreamweaver for Linux

 

Could you give me more info about Virtualbox?


Edited by MelissaPleases, 24 February 2015 - 09:35 AM.

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Case: CoolerMaster Storm Trooper Full ATX | Motherboard: GIGABYTE GA-Z170X | CPU: Intel Core i7-6700K 8M Skylake Quad-Core | GPU: MSI Radeon R9 390X 8GB 512-Bit | PSU: EVGA 80 PLUS GOLD 850 W | RAM: Corsair Vengeance DDR4 SDRAM [4x8GB] Audio: Integrated Creative Sound Core 3D 5.1 | Internal Storage: Samsung 2 TB HDD | Seagate 1 TB HDD | Samsung 500GB SSD [x2] | Mushkin 500GB SSD | External Storage: Seagate 2TB | Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS324 Dual Layer

Display 1: AOC I2757Fh 27" | Display 2 & 3: LG 24MP57HQ-P 24" | Operating Systems: OS 1: Windows 10 Professional | OS 2: Linux Mint Cinnamon | OS 3: Windows 7 Ultimate x-64 | Antivirus: MS Security Essentials | Firewall: Windows Firewall


#9 NickAu

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Posted 25 February 2015 - 09:49 PM


 

Could you give me more info about Virtualbox?

With pleasure. 

VirtualBox - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


How to Install Windows 7 in VirtualBox within Ubuntu this will be the same on Linux Mint.


Video not my work

http://youtu.be/1DhwS4eZExU

 

 

 

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Your PC has more than enough grunt to run several Operating systems in Virtual machine at the same time.

 

This video shows me playing around with VM. I can run 4 operating systems at the same time, The host machine is Kubuntu 14.

http://youtu.be/Heeeg98kaaY


Edited by NickAu, 25 February 2015 - 09:56 PM.


#10 MelissaPleases

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Posted 26 February 2015 - 08:05 AM

To clarify (for myself), what you're saying is to make the primary OS Linux, and run Windows as a virtual OS? If I do that, will I need to reinstall all software, or can it stay where it is - meaning, can the current Windows installation be run as it exists now? Or does it have to be reinstalled? Reinstalling actually might not be a bad idea - I haven't done a clean install of Windows for some time, and I generally like to do that every 12 - 18 months, just to get everything started fresh.

 

I've gone ahead and created a new partition on the system drive. Windows now resides in a partition that's approximately 735 GB, and I have a clean partition that's approximately 360 GB. I'm not quite sure where the other 5 GB got off to - it seems like a lot of space to be reserved for Windows use.

 

Having now taken a look at the videos, would it make sense to leave Windows 7 as the primary OS, and run Linux in a virtual machine? The reason I ask is, I use DisplayFusion to support three displays. One thing I've noticed in Linux is that the displays are simply clones of each other, and that I can't actually move my mouse cursor from display to display, in order to work in different windows on different displays. So far, I haven't located anything for Linux that seems to handle multiple displays the same way that DisplayFusion does in Windows, and I've become quite spoiled having these three independent displays to work with.

 

Now that I'm doing this, I find myself really anxious to get it done. Aside from the nuts and bolts of setting up and running multiple a OS machine, I've become more and more disillusioned with Windows in general, considering how vulnerable it is. It's my understanding that Linux machines are far less vulnerable to outside attacks.

 

Edit 1: Okay, the answer to the question about Host OS vs. Guest OS was answered in the Wikipedia article you linked to. If I can find something for Linux that will allow me to configure multiple displays the way that I have them now, I'll use Linux as the primary OS. If not, I'll most likely continue to use Windows as a primary.

 

Edit 2: At the VM download site, I don't see Linux Mint listed. I'm pretty sure that one of the Linux-based downloads will work, but I'm not sure which one that would be? Since Mint is based on Debian & Ubuntu, I assume I would need one of these VM downloads, but I'm not sure which one to grab.


Edited by MelissaPleases, 26 February 2015 - 08:29 AM.

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Case: CoolerMaster Storm Trooper Full ATX | Motherboard: GIGABYTE GA-Z170X | CPU: Intel Core i7-6700K 8M Skylake Quad-Core | GPU: MSI Radeon R9 390X 8GB 512-Bit | PSU: EVGA 80 PLUS GOLD 850 W | RAM: Corsair Vengeance DDR4 SDRAM [4x8GB] Audio: Integrated Creative Sound Core 3D 5.1 | Internal Storage: Samsung 2 TB HDD | Seagate 1 TB HDD | Samsung 500GB SSD [x2] | Mushkin 500GB SSD | External Storage: Seagate 2TB | Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS324 Dual Layer

Display 1: AOC I2757Fh 27" | Display 2 & 3: LG 24MP57HQ-P 24" | Operating Systems: OS 1: Windows 10 Professional | OS 2: Linux Mint Cinnamon | OS 3: Windows 7 Ultimate x-64 | Antivirus: MS Security Essentials | Firewall: Windows Firewall


#11 Al1000

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Posted 26 February 2015 - 08:41 AM

One thing to consider is that running Windows in a VM on Linux, you will still be using the Linux hardware drivers. While they do the job for the most part, and are adequate for most applications, they perform less well on average compared to drivers for Windows. This mostly concerns drivers for graphics cards.

So if you need to get the best out of your hardware, I would stick with a Windows installation and dual boot with Linux. I started dual booting Ubuntu with XP around a year ago, and at that point in time still used Windows for most things. I gradually switched over though, and now only keep Windows for a few applications and use Linux for everything else.

Having paid for these applications, you might as well get your money's worth. :)

Edited by Al1000, 26 February 2015 - 08:43 AM.


#12 Al1000

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Posted 26 February 2015 - 08:53 AM

One thing I've noticed in Linux is that the displays are simply clones of each other, and that I can't actually move my mouse cursor from display to display

You will be able to enable a multiple monitor display once you install a graphics driver, after installing the operating system. Mint and other similar Linux operating systems have a utility in the menu for "additional drivers," where it will most likely recommend a graphics driver for you to download and install - which is simply a matter of clicking on the icon (and entering your password). As with all other software in Linux repositories, download and installation is automatic.

I have a dual monitor display on my desktop pc with both Linux operating systems that I have installed to it, and it works just like it would in Windows.

 

EDIT: here is a short video I found which should give you the general idea. At the moment you will be using one of the basic graphic drivers included on the DVD, but once you install a driver specific to your grahics card you should find that setting up a multiple monitor display in Linux is much the same as doing so in Windows.

 


Edited by Al1000, 26 February 2015 - 09:12 AM.


#13 shadow-warrior

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Posted 26 February 2015 - 09:01 AM

I would keep your windows Partition seeing its all there... maybe when you install linux  you cold try running windows in Vbox....you do actually have to install it like you would  normally..  I found it worked better for me than using WINE on Linux

 

I have 1 pc where i keep my Windows 7 on a partition just for some business software, dreamweaver WYSIWYG and 1 or 2 other things....but 98% of my computer time  and my Gfs is now done on Linux



#14 MelissaPleases

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Posted 26 February 2015 - 11:16 AM

Well, I'm back to being a complete newbie here, it seems... LOL!

 

Thanks for the info about using multiple displays - I'm happy to see that.

 

So, I guess for now that I'll be running a dual-boot. You're right - it will be a major PITA to have to reinstall all that Windows software, but then again, it is something that I do on a regular, if not really frequent basis. Since I'm going to go ahead and completely revamp my machine anyway, I think I'll do a fresh Windows install as well. I've found over the years that doing that on a regular basis keeps Windows running more efficiently. And the dual-boot seems the better choice right now, since I do a fair amount of gaming. I need my GPU to run at optimum levels for that. I'll do an installation of Windows in VM as well, to get an idea about the different efficiency levels between using a separate boot copy, and one that runs in VM. If the difference isn't that noticeable, I may drop the dual boot and go to just a VM later on.

 

So, that said, I'll get started with a clean Windows installation tomorrow morning, then install Mint. I'll get back to this thread after everything is set up.

 

Thanks for everyone's help and input. I'm excited about making this switch - it's something I've toyed with in the back of my mind for quite a while now. I can easily see Windows becoming just an occasional, necessary evil. It's going to feel strange spending most of my time here in the Linux forums, LMAO!

 

I just happened to think - before I do this, I want to run through the Windows software I have, and check to see if there are Linux versions of that software. In the cases where there isn't a Linux version, I'll ask here if anyone knows of or can recommend similar applications for Linux.


Edited by MelissaPleases, 26 February 2015 - 11:19 AM.

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Case: CoolerMaster Storm Trooper Full ATX | Motherboard: GIGABYTE GA-Z170X | CPU: Intel Core i7-6700K 8M Skylake Quad-Core | GPU: MSI Radeon R9 390X 8GB 512-Bit | PSU: EVGA 80 PLUS GOLD 850 W | RAM: Corsair Vengeance DDR4 SDRAM [4x8GB] Audio: Integrated Creative Sound Core 3D 5.1 | Internal Storage: Samsung 2 TB HDD | Seagate 1 TB HDD | Samsung 500GB SSD [x2] | Mushkin 500GB SSD | External Storage: Seagate 2TB | Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS324 Dual Layer

Display 1: AOC I2757Fh 27" | Display 2 & 3: LG 24MP57HQ-P 24" | Operating Systems: OS 1: Windows 10 Professional | OS 2: Linux Mint Cinnamon | OS 3: Windows 7 Ultimate x-64 | Antivirus: MS Security Essentials | Firewall: Windows Firewall


#15 Guest_hollowface_*

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Posted 26 February 2015 - 06:11 PM

I honestly think I'd prefer to do a separate partition on the main drive - I have far more than enough usable space, so it really makes sense to just have Windows and Linux installed on the same drive.


I haven't done a clean install of Windows for some time, and I generally like to do that every 12 - 18 months, just to get everything started fresh


Since you are using Windows 7, I'm assuming you are using BIOS not UEFI, and since you are installing both operating systems to the same drive this would mean you are using an MBR partition table. If you are using the same MBR for both operating systems' bootstrap code (which it sounds like you are, and is the best option for most people) you should be aware that the next time you decide to re-install Windows to refresh your system it will ovewrite GRUB2 making it impossible to boot into Linux Mint. Keep a Linux Mint live-cd handy so that you can re-install GRUB2 when-ever you re-install Windows.
 




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