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Dual GPU Market share?


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#1 SEANIA

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Posted 17 February 2015 - 06:58 PM

I know the regular desktop/laptop discrete GPU market share is somthing like 30%AMD/70%Nvidia. Question is, of only the people running dual card setups- what is the market share?

 

AMD is alot more forgiving, allowing mixed RAM amounts, mixed RAM manufactures, mixed card manufactures, mixed clock speeds, and even mixed GPU chip variants (going so far as to allow crossfire with their integrated stuff). Where as Nvidia has better technical support, better multi GPU drivers, better frame times, better ultalization/scaling in non mantle games, better power consumption ect~

 

I'm curious to know what people view as a more viable upgrade path when put into actual practice- IE after all the talk, fanboying, and technical demenstrations of "mines better then yours"- who is actually running their stuff like that?

 

Does anyone have links to some stastictics on the matter? More gaming oreinted ones would be nice as well as excluding dual GPU cards like the 7990, 690, and Titian Z. As outside of that, professional programs seem to use all cards wether or not they're linked and I've never seen any one side claiming their multi GPU work better for those kinds of things (besides being faster that is).

 

Personaly rarely see SLI setups except in super high end rigs. Usually just see crossfire in the day-to-day stuff, and would assume it's because it's easy to just find a similarly based GPU later on (ebay, overstock, ect). Then it is to find a exact clone of your current one. Serious on that exact thing to, down to the revision model somtimes since some manufactures will flip to incompatablie bios's(es?) from one revision to the next (proceed to keep the name, model number, ect).

 

Would love to here what anyone else has to say on what is more common to see overall.


99% of the time, I edit for type-o's and grammar. I'll note it if that's not the case. 

I write near essays for most my responses, and then try to condense as best I can to the introduction of one. Less is more. Let me know if I post to much. 

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#2 YeahBleeping

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Posted 17 February 2015 - 07:21 PM

I am not exactly sure what your asking here and if it is what I think it is you would probably have to contact an information gathering site like passmark or 3dmark to find out of they are willing to share actual statistic numbers or not.

 

If you are looking for a general response of In my opinion so to speak than my answer is I would be much more willing to buy a single card solution that provides close to SLI card/s performance than trying to wrestle with SLI/Crossfire.

 

When I put together my last PC it was with SLI in mind I got a GTX8600? I think and planned on getting another down the road.  I bought an 850 watt Etasis PSU (one of the best you can buy) However SLI never came to fruition because by the time I WAS able to buy another card there were single card solutions that provided just as close benchmarks as if I were to find and buy another GTX.

 

Why would I want to go through the ' headache ' of SLI when there was a single card that could do the job just as well I thought..

 

So I never went with SLI.  Can it provide better performace ? Sure but I decided that the possible headaches were not worth the extra FPS .. especially since I hadn't found ONE game at the time ' (other than far cry) that would push my card to the limit.

 

By the time I was ready to buy a new video card my old GTX's memory was already failing.  (banded graphics and artifacts no matter how I tried to cool the card down)  I even epoxied aftermarket heatsinks to every IC I could on the card.

 

So now I needed a new graphics card.  I am not a wealthy person so ... I went with a single card solution, however- If you can afford that SLI stuff .. and don't mind dealing with possible headaches of banded video or (which card is over heating) or will this card work with that card.  Then by all means go for it.

 

my 2 1/2 cents.



#3 SEANIA

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Posted 17 February 2015 - 07:51 PM

 Question is- what is the market share of dedicated GPU's- including only dual GPU setups.

When I put together my last PC it was with SLI in mind I got a GTX8600? I think and planned on getting another down the road.  I bought an 850 watt Etasis PSU (one of the best you can buy) However SLI never came to fruition because by the time I WAS able to buy another card there were single card solutions that provided just as close benchmarks as if I were to find and buy another GTX.

 

 

The idea is, and what makes it a good upgrade option for some people, is buying the card that performs as good as two down the road costs more then just buying a used card of what you already have later (at the time of buying- not overall).

 

I have two 7950's. The first cost me 230$ used back in early 2013/late 2012 (wasn't used for bitcoin mining by previous user :D). The 2nd one I got in late 2014 for 120$. Now I could have got a 290 for 230-ish used at that time and it would've performed about the same. However that aditional 110$ was not something I had at the time. So even though overall it's a better performance stable option- it would've cost more at the time.

 

Price of upgrade to single was- 230$

Price of upgrade to crossfire was- 120$

 

Both gave around the same performance and the dual setup was cheaper.

 

For me, the value cost effectiveness with possible headaches over costing more and providing less headaches is worth it. It's why I have a 120$ Z97 motherboard and a K 240$ i5 instead of a non K 300$ i7 (or Xeon that's a integrated GPU stripped i7 at 250$) and a 55$ board. The i7 is better out of the box and costs about the same to run stable, but since the i5 can overclock to outperform in the areas I need it to at the same price it's a better option for me.


Edited by SEANIA, 17 February 2015 - 08:06 PM.

99% of the time, I edit for type-o's and grammar. I'll note it if that's not the case. 

I write near essays for most my responses, and then try to condense as best I can to the introduction of one. Less is more. Let me know if I post to much. 

I do a lot of spacing for readability. Let me know if that makes my posts seem to big. 


#4 YeahBleeping

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Posted 17 February 2015 - 08:15 PM

I see your point and I understand you see mine.  For you it was worth it to ' risk the headache ' where for me I was more willing to .. eat spaghetti and kielbasa dinners until I had enough for the card I wanted LOL B)

 

But I think your main question is ' what are the numbers of people out there actually using SLI / Crossfire.  And the answer would be difficult if not impossible to provide.  As I stated you may be able to get passmark or 3dmark to provide statistics, but those are going to be only those people who actually downloaded their program and agreed to share their info.

 

Finding the numbers your looking for, I think is not going to be an easy task.



#5 SEANIA

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Posted 17 February 2015 - 08:20 PM

I see your point and I understand you see mine.  For you it was worth it to ' risk the headache ' where for me I was more willing to .. eat spaghetti and kielbasa dinners until I had enough for the card I wanted LOL B)

 

I am the king of cost effective computer parts :P Did you know about the IGP stripped, i7 to Xeon rebrand for 50$ less before I mentioned it? Has no conflicts with (most) regular consumer boards either.

 

Maybe Steam statistics have something on it....


99% of the time, I edit for type-o's and grammar. I'll note it if that's not the case. 

I write near essays for most my responses, and then try to condense as best I can to the introduction of one. Less is more. Let me know if I post to much. 

I do a lot of spacing for readability. Let me know if that makes my posts seem to big. 





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