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Wireless Card repeatedly disconnecting and reconnecting


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#1 evo-lution19

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Posted 17 February 2015 - 03:57 PM

Hello all.

 

I'm currently messing around with an old desktop computer (Windows XP) with a view to possibly upgrading the overall system and finding a use for it however I've come across an issue I can't get my head around.

 

The computer connects to the internet wirelessly however for some unknown reason it keeps disconnecting then reconnecting sporadically, but typically every couple of minutes. I'm not sure if this is an issue with the wireless card as other devices (mobile phones, tablets and laptops) have no problems connecting wirelessly and don't disconnect/reconnect in this way.

 

All the drivers are up to date and having had a quick search round the web no real fix has been provided. Just curious to know if this machine (or wireless card) has seen better days and/or if there's something I could do to fix it before purchasing more RAM, media card, OS system, et al.

 

Sure I'll probably need to provide more info so just let me know and I'll get it for you as requested.

 

Thanks in advance for reading and for any/all responses.



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#2 JohnC_21

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Posted 17 February 2015 - 04:17 PM

What XP SP do you have. It is SP3?

 

What is the make and model of the desktop or MB if a custom build. How much Ram do you currently have installed? Is your XP at SP3? You can check this kb article.

 

Right click the wireless adapter in Device Manager. Select Properties and under the Details tab select Hardware IDs in the dropdown box. Copy and post the first line.

 

If the desktop is using a Wireless Card you could try a USB wireless adapter like this for your desktop if your computer supports USB 2.0. I would look at replacing the Wireless card first before updating anything else. That would be the cheapest route.

 

If you plan on upgrading the system you could look at a linux distro like Ubuntu or Linux Mint. Running a Live CD, you may find there is no Wireless problem. You would need 1GB or RAM to run comfortably though.



#3 girlguru

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Posted 17 February 2015 - 04:25 PM

There are a number of different reasons besides a failing wireless adapter that can cause it to have  trouble connecting. 

1. I would first try to download the wi-fi driver, remove the old one and install the driver again.  It will recreate default settings and is the cheapest fix.

2. Your router might be far away, with a lower signal strength.  Are you trying to connect in the same place as the other devices?

3. You could have a manufacturer's (like Dell) utility competing with the built-in windows utility to manage your networks.  Set windows to manage the network and see if this fixes the problem.

4. You could have more than one profile set up for a specific network.  Go into Network and Sharing center, click on Manage Network Connections to see which network profiles are set up.  Remove any duplicates and reconnect.

5.  You could have a number of wi-fi networks locally on the same channel (usually channel 6).  Or the machine might have trouble connecting to a booster on the network.  If you see a number of networks available to connect to, there might be interference. 

6. A USB adapter is cheap, and uses the newer wireless standards (802.11ac or 802.11n), which your old internal wireless adapter won't.  If you can stand to lose a usb port to the receiver, try it.  It will help you identify whether XP is to blame or the internal wireless card.



#4 evo-lution19

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Posted 17 February 2015 - 04:32 PM

Thanks for the reply! Think this covers your queries;

 

- Microsoft Windows XP Home Edition Service Pack 3

- AMD Athlon 1.99GHz

- 2GB Ram

- Belkin Wireless G Desktop Card

 

I went through the troubleshooting detailed in that kb article the other day but it hasn't made a difference. Might just be that the wireless card is the problem but just tryiong to figure if it is an issue with that or something else I'm overlooking.



#5 JohnC_21

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Posted 17 February 2015 - 04:42 PM

Can you post the vendor and device Id of the wireless adapter in Device Manager hardware Ids?



#6 evo-lution19

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Posted 17 February 2015 - 04:57 PM

There are a number of different reasons besides a failing wireless adapter that can cause it to have  trouble connecting. 

1. I would first try to download the wi-fi driver, remove the old one and install the driver again.  It will recreate default settings and is the cheapest fix.

2. Your router might be far away, with a lower signal strength.  Are you trying to connect in the same place as the other devices?

3. You could have a manufacturer's (like Dell) utility competing with the built-in windows utility to manage your networks.  Set windows to manage the network and see if this fixes the problem.

4. You could have more than one profile set up for a specific network.  Go into Network and Sharing center, click on Manage Network Connections to see which network profiles are set up.  Remove any duplicates and reconnect.

5.  You could have a number of wi-fi networks locally on the same channel (usually channel 6).  Or the machine might have trouble connecting to a booster on the network.  If you see a number of networks available to connect to, there might be interference. 

6. A USB adapter is cheap, and uses the newer wireless standards (802.11ac or 802.11n), which your old internal wireless adapter won't.  If you can stand to lose a usb port to the receiver, try it.  It will help you identify whether XP is to blame or the internal wireless card.

 

Thanks girlguru

 

1. Already went through removng and reinstalling old drivers with new but hasn't provided a fix.

2. Signal strength is always 'Very Good' or 'Excellent' and works on every other device used in the same location. The connection just drops, then reconnects.

3. Windows manages the network so not that.

4. Only one profile set-up for the wireless network.

5. Can you expand on this? There are always a selection of wireless networks available however it's only ever been connected to my home wireless router.

6. I think I'll get my hands on a USB adapter given the price.



#7 evo-lution19

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Posted 17 February 2015 - 05:02 PM

Can you post the vendor and device Id of the wireless adapter in Device Manager hardware Ids?

 

I think this is what you're after (edited);

 

PCI\VEN_1799&DEV_700F&SUBSYS_700F1799&REV_20\3&61AAA01&0&48


Edited by evo-lution19, 17 February 2015 - 05:12 PM.


#8 JohnC_21

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Posted 17 February 2015 - 05:05 PM

Is that the full line? It should do but having the full line is best. You can edit your post if there is more than just the above.

 

Edit: I looked up that Vendor and Device ID and it seems to be some kind of proprietary driver from Belkin using a Realtek RTL8185. There is no driver on Realtek's site for that particular chip (It's not a common chipset) so there is no updating to Realtek's own driver, sorry. The latest driver I could find for that Vendor and device ID is here. You may already have this version.  If you decide to download it, you can click the hard drive icon and provide a junk email address. The download is direct from Belkin This is not a direct download from Belkin. Do you know someone with a USB adapter they may be able to lend you?


Edited by JohnC_21, 17 February 2015 - 05:25 PM.


#9 evo-lution19

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Posted 17 February 2015 - 05:46 PM

The driver update I ran was through the SlimDrivers program IIRC (or it may have been through the Belkin webpage -> http://www.belkin.com/uk/support-article?articleNum=4896#)

 

I'm popping out tomorrow so will pick a USB adapter up.
 



#10 JohnC_21

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Posted 17 February 2015 - 05:59 PM

You could download a linux distro like Puppy. It's only about 140 MB. Burn the iso and set up the network via the Wizard and see if you still get a problem. For an XP computer I recommend Puppy 5.2.8 here.



#11 evo-lution19

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Posted 17 February 2015 - 06:17 PM

You could download a linux distro like Puppy. It's only about 140 MB. Burn the iso and set up the network via the Wizard and see if you still get a problem. For an XP computer I recommend Puppy 5.2.8 here.

 

Can you expand on this as I can't say I know a great deal about it and/or its application?



#12 JohnC_21

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Posted 17 February 2015 - 06:29 PM

Puppy is an OS that runs in RAM and off the CD you burn. After downloading the iso file you can burn it using isoburner in XP or by right clicking the iso file in Windows 7 and selecting Burn Disk Image. Puppy will boot and you will get a desktop like it is shown in the link I provided. If it detects your wireless card you can use the Wizard to connect wirelessly to your network. You will need to provide your wireless password in order to connect. Here is a page on setting up Puppy wirelessly. This all depends on if Puppy can detect that Realtek chipset.

 

You can play around with it. Since it does not touch your hard drive, you can't mess anything up unless you access your internal drive which in your case would be sda1. That would be in the lower left of the Puppy desktop. You can use Puppy to tranfer files from a Windows computer that does not boot. See this guide.


Edited by JohnC_21, 17 February 2015 - 06:29 PM.


#13 evo-lution19

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Posted 17 February 2015 - 07:43 PM

Puppy is an OS that runs in RAM and off the CD you burn. After downloading the iso file you can burn it using isoburner in XP or by right clicking the iso file in Windows 7 and selecting Burn Disk Image. Puppy will boot and you will get a desktop like it is shown in the link I provided. If it detects your wireless card you can use the Wizard to connect wirelessly to your network. You will need to provide your wireless password in order to connect. Here is a page on setting up Puppy wirelessly. This all depends on if Puppy can detect that Realtek chipset.

 

You can play around with it. Since it does not touch your hard drive, you can't mess anything up unless you access your internal drive which in your case would be sda1. That would be in the lower left of the Puppy desktop. You can use Puppy to tranfer files from a Windows computer that does not boot. See this guide.

 

Ah, okay, I understand. Would the benefit of these being that I would learn where the problem is with the wireless dropping and reconnecting?



#14 YeahBleeping

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Posted 17 February 2015 - 07:44 PM

Hello in the interest of helping nailing this down have you updated the bios in the router?  Does the xp machine have a static ip or not? 

 

control panel>network connections>right click on the active network connections>click properties

 

click properties button on the newly opened window>click on internet protocol tcp/ip click properties on the lower right of that window is the ' obtain an ip address automatically checked (circled with filled dot?) or is use the following IP address filled?

 

Some routers had issues with older versions of windows connecting to the router.  Make sure you have the newest version of bios for your router and you have all windows updates you should have service pack 3 and all the DOT NETs.

 

  1. Click on Start and then Control Panel.

  2. Click on the Performance and Maintenance link.

    Note: If you're viewing the Classic View of Control Panel, you won't see this link. Simply double-click on the System icon and proceed to Step 4.

  3. In the Performance and Maintenance window, click on the System Control Panel icon at the bottom of the window.

  4. When the System Properties window opens it should default to the General tab. If not, choose it manually.

  5. In the System: area of the General tab you'll find the operating system version and the service pack level. See the screen shot on this page for an idea of what you're looking for.

    Note: If you don't have any service pack installed, you won't see "Service Pack 0" or "Service Pack None" - there will be no reference to a service pack at all.

  6. The latest Windows XP service pack is Service Pack 3 (SP3).






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