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Possible Hard Drive Damage - Not Recognized


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#1 Ridger1

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Posted 14 February 2015 - 09:58 AM

Hello,

 

Having some issues with a WD hard drive... and I'm holding on to some hope.

 

I was using the HD in an external enclosure as an external drive copying some files, and the HD got knocked off the desk while it was copying. The HD was not detected at all through a USB connection, therefore I thought it was toast, which is very upsetting as it was my back up for old files, pictures, etc.

 

I purchased a new HD to install in the old external enclosure, and when I plugged everything in the new HD would not be recognized through a USB connection either... which lead me to believe it might be the enclosure and not the HD as I originally suspected.

 

Since I had some hope that I might be able to recover the files and lost pictures without an expense recovery such as a clean room/etc, I thought I would try to boot the damaged HD in an older desktop via SATA connection.

 

Installed and connected the HD via secondary SATA connection as a slave, and the pc won't boot with the drive and when the pc starts I get the error message;

 

Error auto-sensing secondary slave hard disk drive

 

Any idea where to start with this? I think the first part would be to try and get the old damaged HD booted to see if anything is recoverable, and to run some diagnostics. Then I can work on the new HD and determine if the enclosure is damaged or the old HD.

 

Any help is greatly appreciated!

 

 



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#2 JohnC_21

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Posted 14 February 2015 - 10:15 AM

I would get an adapter like this. Then you can test different drives easily. Did you test the new drive in the old enclosure on a different computer?



#3 Ridger1

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Posted 14 February 2015 - 12:09 PM

Yes I tested both new and old drives on a couple different computers in the external enclosure.

I think the SATA connection should suffice, just need to get around that error message somehow.

#4 JohnC_21

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Posted 14 February 2015 - 12:24 PM

You can hot plug the SATA drive after windows boots. See if that works.



#5 Ridger1

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Posted 14 February 2015 - 02:52 PM

Just tried that... It doesn't want to boot with the slave drive enabled, even if the drive is unplugged. If I boot the pc without the slave drive enabled, then it doesn't recognize anything when I hot plug the SATA drive.

If I boot with slave enabled and plugged in, I get the message in my original post.

If I boot with slave enabled but not plugged in, I get this message;

Drive 0 not found: Serial ATA, SATA-0

Any thoughts?

Thanks

#6 JohnC_21

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Posted 14 February 2015 - 03:13 PM

If you do not want to try using another adapter I can only think of the following.

 

Boot a linux disk like Puppy and then hot plug the drive. Puppy may see it where Windows doesn't. When you hot plug it at the Puppy desktop, you should see a USB icon appear. Click once on it and hopefully Puppy will mount the drive and open it's File Manager.

Edit: If the File Manager does open click once on your internal OS drive, probably sda1 or sda2. This will open another File Manager Windows. You can select files using left click+Ctrl. Or, window around the files/folders. Drag the highlighted files/folders to the internal drive File Manager Window. A small dialog box will appear asking if you want to copy or move. Select copy and check the Quiet Box.

 

If that does not work, place the drive back in the USB enclosure. Boot Puppy and then attach the USB enclosure.

 

What model WD drive is this. Did you enable Encryption? Or was this a regular WD drive in your own enclosure?

 

http://carltonbale.com/western-digital-mybook-drive-lock-encryption-failure-and-recovery/

 

http://www.zdnet.com/article/the-self-encrypting-drive-you-may-already-own/


Edited by JohnC_21, 14 February 2015 - 03:23 PM.


#7 Ridger1

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Posted 14 February 2015 - 06:20 PM

Ok thanks - I will give that a try and report back.

Is it safe to boot Puppy from a USB?

#8 JohnC_21

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Posted 14 February 2015 - 06:40 PM

Yes, it is safe. Use Rufus to create the bootable USB flash drive. Select MBR as a partition scheme. Everything else is default. At the dropdown box that says FreeDos, select iso image and click the icon next to it. Browse to the iso file and then click start. All data on the USB flash drive will be erased.






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