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#1 macrip3

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Posted 14 February 2015 - 09:26 AM

How can someone tell if all of my computer devices inside the case would work with Ubuntu?  Always wanted to try out the world of Ubuntu and not have to worry about Viruses and Malware.

 

Just asking.



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#2 mralias518

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Posted 14 February 2015 - 02:26 PM

How can someone tell if all of my computer devices inside the case would work with Ubuntu?  Always wanted to try out the world of Ubuntu and not have to worry about Viruses and Malware.

 

Just asking.

One way is to use a live boot version. Burn the image to a USB or CD and boot your machine. You can try all kinds of distros this way. 


Linux Mint 17.1 Rebecca & Windows 8.1 Dual Boot.

Dell E6410 i5 7.60518 Gib of ram

 


#3 Guest_hollowface_*

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Posted 14 February 2015 - 03:53 PM

How can someone tell if all of my computer devices inside the case would work with Ubuntu?


Sometimes searching around on Google you can find posts by other people who confirm that Ubuntu works with certain hardware (make sure to pay attention to which version of Ubuntu they were using in case a newer version doesn't work). You can also do as mralias518 has suggested and use the installation media in try-mode to test Ubuntu out without actually installing it. (Don't be dismayed if it runs slowly in try mode, this is normal, and does not reflect how it will run when installed.)

Always wanted to try out the world of Ubuntu


Depending on how powerful your hardware is you might consider installing Ubuntu in a virtual machine. (A program you install on your computer that pretends to be a computer.) Not all computers have powerful enough hardware to run a virtual machine (the specs on your profile suggest you don't have enough ram to enjoyably proceed with this route but I thought I'd mention it just in case), but if you do it's a great option for learning the basics of an operating system (because you can safely trash the virtual machine). If after using it in the virtual machine you really like Ubuntu you can always install it on your real computer. (When dealing with virtual machines the real machine is more commonly called the host, host machine, or physical machine.) VMware Player, and VirtualBox are two popular free virtual machine programs. Personally I prefer VMware Player, but VirtualBox is a better choice for most people, it is also more feature rich. It's important to remember that virtual machines are not as powerful as the real machine, and can be sluggish depending on hardware.

Always wanted to try out the world of Ubuntu and not have to worry about Viruses and Malware.


There are very few known viruses for Ubuntu, and Windows malware (such as viruses) can't infect Ubuntu. (There is a program called WINE that allows running some Windows programs on Ubuntu, this includes running Windows malware). However all operating systems have the potential to be compromised; regardless of whether you use Ubuntu, Windows, or Mac OS X you will need to use safe computing practices in order to avoid being compromised.
 

#4 cat1092

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Posted 17 February 2015 - 01:21 AM

Another way, and this in addition to the advice already given, is to make certain that the computer is connected to the Internet at time of install (recommended for many LInux distros). 

 

During the install, not only will the OS be loaded, needed drivers for the system will be downloaded & installed also. Sometimes the graphics driver will need to be changed post-install, but normally it's already there, and that's one of the things that the Driver Manager is for. Chipset, USB & many other drivers has already been installed. If a webcam is included with a notebook or PC, just install from the Ubuntu Software Center the "Cheese' app, and take a few selfies. It'll also work for Skype for Linux, which is available from the same place as the Cheese app. 

 

While best results will be achieved by being connected to the Internet during install, note that some drivers are also built into the Ubuntu ISO. However by no means all. 

 

As far as infections goes, I've been using Ubuntu based Linux versions for close to 6 years now, and not once have I been infected. There are no Linux viruses & malware 'in the wild' at the time of this posting, however as LInux usage continues to grow, that could change. Just as with Windows or Mac, as posted above by hollowface, safe computing practices is a must. There is a common myth that one can install most any version of LInux & do as desired with no ill side effects, and while that may be possible, it's not good security practice. Ubuntu (nor any version of Linux) will also not shield users from illegal activities. Your ISP can still see where you're going. 

 

One thing that will go a long ways toward protecting Ubuntu (as well as Linux OS's that's Ubuntu based), is to enable the ufw Firewall as soon after the computer is rebooted post install. 

 

To do so, simply find the Terminal on the left side, click onto it, and type or copy/paste:

 

sudo ufw enable

 

And then type in your password. Note that during Terminal sessions, no progress movement of the typing of password will be seen. This is for protection & how Ubuntu further protects it's users. 

 

Afterwards, it should say 'Firewall is active & enabled at startup' (or similar wording). Hackers now cannot get into your computer. However, this doesn't mean that conducting business using public wi-fi 'hotspots' is safe. It only prevents hackers from getting inside of your computer. You'll need a VPN, just as with any other OS, to encrypt your incoming/outbound traffic for maximum protection during wireless sessions. 

 

To date, most of my internal hardware has worked fine. Some external hardware, such as add-on webcams & printers, won't always work as intended, especially printers, that's why it's best if considering installing Ubuntu, to check compatibility for what you have. Or if in the market for one, find out which ones works best with Ubuntu. Many Linux users has reported great success with HP printers (there's a dedicated team for the brand), though there are others that's compatible. I'll likely get another at some point, though my Kodak prints well if I send a document to a Flash drive & I plug it in & go to the LCD screen, it doesn't do well with 64 bit Linux, although with older 32 bit versions, it printed quite well. 

 

The problem was that Kodak went bankrupt, and afterwards, for obvious reasons, there was no need to develop drivers for the brand. Many who writes these drivers gets paid little, so there's no need to waste many hours on a fading brand, At the same time, I commend these folks for performing the work that they do. 

 

So in this Topic, you've been hopefully been provided some suggestions to go on. No one can guarantee that every component of your computer will work (or as intended), especially as the OEM setup the computer, many of the specialized functions that's performed by keyboard shortcuts (or combinations) won't work. However, there are also workarounds for many functions. Between seeking assistance on the forum, and Google searches, one can have a quite acceptable performer in a Ubuntu computer. 

 

One last thing before I close, Linux Mint is also considered a great 'drop in' Windows replacement, especially the MATE version (best compatibility across the board), with Cinnamon & KDE for those who wants more eye candy & more powerful graphics, and Xfce for computers with less resources. MATE is not a watered down version of MInt, as newbies & pros alike runs the OS. 

 

http://www.linuxmint.com/download.php

 

Just something to throw out there for thought. 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#5 shadow-warrior

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Posted 19 February 2015 - 11:56 AM

I have always found that if you have either very new or very old hardware Linux is OK.... Some distros have a few issues with graphics cards and network cards.. though in general you will find a work around for most issues in the forums etc....I have  used Linux for over 10 yrs and can only remember 1 PC that was too new for the distro i was using..



#6 cat1092

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Posted 20 February 2015 - 02:05 AM

shadow-warrior, I know where you're coming from, have had a couple of computers that was too light for the distro, but that's not bad, considering I owned several before the last couple of years. 

 

Back when I began in 2009, one didn't need a powerful computer to run a Linux OS most of the time, just a desire to learn. There were a few that required more power, and computers in use for a particular purpose, but for Web browsing, email & transactions, much anything would do & back then, the full version of Mint 7 (Gloria) would run well on 512MB RAM, fly on 1GB. Now, only the Xfce & LXDE versions will run on such specs, in addition to the many 'Puppy' variants. 

 

Today, the newer the hardware, the better, and from a security standpoint, it's best to have a native PAE enabled computer. While some distros are designed for non-PAE enabled computers, these aren't the best to run. Older computers doesn't have the hardware security layers in the CPU as modern ones does. NX may also be a missing feature of older CPU's. 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#7 Al1000

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Posted 20 February 2015 - 04:47 AM

I have always found that if you have either very new or very old hardware Linux is OK.... Some distros have a few issues with graphics cards and network cards.. though in general you will find a work around for most issues in the forums etc....I have used Linux for over 10 yrs and can only remember 1 PC that was too new for the distro i was using..


Most of the incompatibility issues I've had and have come across on the forum, relate to newer Linux operating systems not working on older hardware. But of course there are plenty of older Linux operating systems that are still supported which will work just fine on older hardware.

#8 cat1092

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Posted 22 February 2015 - 03:18 AM

 

 

 But of course there are plenty of older Linux operating systems that are still supported which will work just fine on older hardware. 

 

Yes, the non-PAE version of Ubuntu that many doesn't know exists is a really good one, brought my 11 year old notebook to life. And would do the same on a Dell Dimension 2400 that's stashed in the closet, where it'll likely remain until someone comes along & says they're desperate for any computer. Actually one said that, and I showed it to him, and he said he was joking about being 'that desperate'. Evidently, he thought it had a dual core Pentium, which if it did, I'd still be using it myself to run Linux Mint on. 

 

There are still a few of the PCI type of GPU's available, which would have worked well for the purpose. It was the motherboard that limited me as to how far I could upgrade, and my sights were set on a new PC at the time. Not scouring eBay for used MB's & a Core2Duo, as well as the needed PSU & GPU to make it all work, could have went to WalMart & bought a $288 special with a warranty for less. 

 

Actually, because of the low L2 cache of the Dell's CPU (512MB), I don't believe it would outperform the install on the 11 year old Thinkpad, at least it's CPU has a 2MB cache. And doesn't waste a lot of power in running. Fires up faster too. 

 

If the OP (macrip3) would provide some PC specs, we could better suggest a plan of action. While booting Ubuntu install media in Live Mode, there may be things that won't work yet, until the install is complete. That's the purpose behind the why most all of the Ubuntu based OS's recommends to be connected to the Internet at time of install. Much of what's being downloaded is device drivers for the OS. After reboot, then the OS gets updated. 

 

While there may still be minor issue not right post install, there are workarounds for nearly every situation, I've had to resort to some & so has countless others. Many issues only takes a bit of time to fix, there's a high chance that any of these are in the Ubuntu Software Center, or available by accessing the Terminal to fetch a few things. Or by using the Driver Manager (first place to check). 

 

That said, the only things I've not seen not working as intended by the OEM are some of the specialized functions of the 'F' keys. There are times that one who has extensive knowledge of Linux can offer a fix, but this can be very time consuming, for a newbie requiring a lot of code to successfully accomplish. Unless that person has good knowledge of how to enter code themselves. In my case, one of those was a button for Turbo Boost on demand. Well, the workaround was simple, even more so than reaching and pressing a button, added 'cpufreq' applet, I could run the computer at any frequency (including Turbo Boost). 

 

Of course, the reason for cpufreq was for longer battery life and reducing heat, yet it works both ways. Notebook users can slow things down & desktop PC users can crank things up. A winner for all. 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#9 bmike1

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Posted 23 February 2015 - 04:49 PM

a tiny bit of advice: after you've installed everything open a text editor (menu>accessories in mint) and copy everything you do down. for instance, if you are advised :

 

  sudo apt-get install whatever

  sudo apt-get install this

  sudo apt-get install that

 

write that down. Then, if you ever need to reinstall or to try another edition of Linux that runs the same package manager all you will need to do is copy-n-paste the above into the terminal, press enter, and wait for it to install. If you decide to try another edition of Linux just replace 'apt-get install' with whatever the distro you want to try uses

 

To make this easy you don't need to write multiple lines. You can write:

 

  sudo apt-get install whatever this that

 

I'll show you mine as an example:

 

sudo ufw enable; sudo ufw limit ssh
sudo add-apt-repository ppa:otto-kesselgulasch/gimp; sudo add-apt-repository ppa:dhor/myway; sudo add-apt-repository ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair; sudo apt-get update; sudo apt-get install ntp photivo virtualbox digikam kipi-plugins exiv2 gphoto2 showfoto gimp gimp-plugin-registry scribus xul-ext-gdata-provider ssh gedit apache2 php5 libapache2-mod-php5 mysql-server kmymoney unetbootin phpmyadmin chromium-browser thunar xbmc pepperflashplugin-nonfree skype google-chrome-stable google-earth-stable gscan2pdf boot-repair; sudo apt-get autoremove
 
the first line starts the firewall. the add-apt-repository lines ensure I have the most up-to-date versions  of certain programs. then you have to update your repository list (you will need to do this too). then I install the packages. then I clean up.

A/V Software? I don't need A/V software. I've run Linux since '98 w/o A/V software and have never had a virus. I never even had a firewall until '01 when I began to get routers with firewalls pre installed. With Linux if a vulnerability is detected a fix is quickly found and then upon your next update the vulnerability is patched.  If you must worry about viruses  on a Linux system only worry about them in the sense that you can infect a windows user. I recommend Linux Mint or, if you need a lighter weight operating system that fits on a cd, MX14 or AntiX.


#10 macrip3

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Posted 24 February 2015 - 07:30 PM

Hey,

cat1092:  Here is my info

It is a Gigabyte B75M-D3H mainboard with KLG DVDRW and on board graphics.  4GB of RAM. 



#11 cat1092

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Posted 25 February 2015 - 03:56 AM

That's a decent motherboard you have, you should be able to run much any Ubuntu OS you want. Some negative reviews, but many who had positive experiences didn't bother to review. There's also some consumers who are never happy with anything, leaving one egg over a long rebate wait, or they don't know how to install a motherboard & messed it up. 4GB RAM is plenty for 64 bit Ubuntu 14.04. Unless you plan to run virtual machines, you'll then need more. 

 

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813128555&nm_mc=KNC-GoogleAdwords-PC&cm_mmc=KNC-GoogleAdwords-PC-_-pla-_-Intel+Motherboards-_-N82E16813128555&gclid=CLm0jrrR_MMCFdgVgQodwQUAiQ&gclsrc=aw.ds

 

I've never installed a new one, but took apart a computer for cleaning for someone else, the entire unit. Though I had plenty of documentation & even a couple of YouTube videos to go by. 

 

At any rate, the CPU's for that MB, as well as the max of 32GB RAM (same as my main PC), makes it a good one for any version of Ubuntu you wish. Here is my suggestion, if you have a spare HDD, install it & temporarily disconnect the SATA & power cables to your currently installed one, then install Ubuntu 14.04 LTS 64 bit on that drive. It doesn't have to be a huge drive, if you have any SATA drive around (even SATA-1), it'll be good for testing Ubuntu out, w/out risking your current install. Once the install is complete, and you fully reboot, shut down the computer afterwards & replug your cables in. 

 

The reason why I recommend 14.04 LTS, is that it's a long term release, meaning you have a full 5 years of support. Short versions, such as 14.10, only has a few months, unless changes has recently been made that I'm not aware of. LTS versions tend to be stable. Short term may have newer features, though not always as stable. 

 

Now for booting, you can install EasyBCD 2.2 from here (free version) to your Windows OS. 

 

http://neosmart.net/EasyBCD/

 

Once installed, open it, and you'll see your boot options as how they are. You'll want to click the 'Add new Entry' tab. Then select the Linux/BSD tab, and you'll see a drop down list, select Grub2. You must do this to prevent errors. Then name the OS what you want, 'Ubuntu' will be fine, and then select 'Automatically select & load' (or similar wording). If successful, you'll see that Ubuntu has been added to the boot menu at the bottom of the app, be looking. Then reboot, and Ubuntu should be one of the options listed, choose it, you'll see a bit of text, then the Grub screen. Just press Enter when you see that (Ubuntu will be at the top), and it should fire right up. 

 

Now, I'm going to advise you on something before you update your OS. This is important & for your security. Find the Terminal (it may be a option to the left), it'll be a black tab, click onto it & type this line of code into it when it opens (it'll look similar to 'cmd' on Windows). Here's the code, it's for your Firewall to be auto enabled & will load at every startup. 

 

sudo ufw enable 

 

You can copy/paste that into the Terminal if you want. Then type your password, you won't see the progress of it, and Enter. It'll show it's active & enabled at startup. Then begin the update process. By the time you do this, you'll likely see a box to the left with a number of updates to be installed. 

 

And that's it!  :thumbup2:

 

This is the only sure fire way of knowing if it's going to run, is go for it. Be sure, as suggested, to be plugged to an Ethernet connection or optional wireless connection. This is how the drivers are installed, and why it's important. You'll have much less issues by being connected, and letting the updates install. Afterwards, normally the only driver that needs to be adjusted is the graphics one. However if you have great video & sound, all is OK. 

 

Good Luck with Ubuntu! :)

 

And please, always feel free to ask questions along the way. I know that you'll have some, because every Linux user here & across the planet has. It's not Windows, therefore you'll have a learning curve. There's no 'dumb' questions here, feel free to ask for assistance rather than spending hours in frustration. We're here for our members & will do all humanly possible, even if that involves posting information from another site, and we'll provide a link to that source. We work in the open around here. 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#12 macrip3

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Posted 02 March 2015 - 06:08 AM

Sure. Thanks everyone. 



#13 cat1092

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Posted 05 March 2015 - 03:10 AM

You're quite welcome & we hope to see you around again soon! :)

 

Welcome to Freedom! :thumbup2:

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 





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