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Copy and pasting a cloned drive


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#1 alankearn

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Posted 14 February 2015 - 04:16 AM

Would it be workable to clone a 2.5 120gb SSD Windows 7 to a external 500gb IDE hard drive and then if needed  sometime in the future copy and paste it back to a SSD

 

Thanks



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#2 Sintharius

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Posted 14 February 2015 - 04:31 AM

Hello there,

Theoretically I think it is possible to clone a Windows installation from one drive to another regardless of drive type.

Two popular choices for cloning Windows installations here are Acronis True Image (this one's shareware) and Macrium Reflect Free.

Regards,
Alex

#3 Platypus

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Posted 14 February 2015 - 05:46 AM

You can't copy and paste a drive, but you can store an image of the SSD on an IDE drive and transfer it to another SSD in the future. I do that all the time.


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#4 alankearn

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Posted 14 February 2015 - 06:31 AM

You can't copy and paste a drive, but you can store an image of the SSD on an IDE drive and transfer it to another SSD in the future. I do that all the time.

So have I got this right please

 

I can copy the clone image that is on the IDE drive and paste it onto the SSD and it would work OK

 

Maybe it would have been more sensible of me if in my first post I asked "is it possible to copy and paste clone images" 

 

Many thanks



#5 Platypus

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Posted 14 February 2015 - 08:13 AM

Cloning is creating an actual physical drive or partition identical to the original. There is nothing to copy or paste.

 

An image is a file containing an exact representation of a complete drive or partition (although it can be compressed, so be a smaller file than the volume it came from), and can be copied to other locations like any other file. But it's just a file, wherever you put it. To become a working drive again it needs to be restored to a drive using the imaging software that created it.

 

I have numerous images of drives from my and other people's computers in various configurations, stored on two USB external drives. I can restore these onto any drive that's large enough for it.

 

For example, one of the images I took last week is of the 120GB SSD from my church's computer. It was using Windows 7 32 bit and a superseded presentation software package we wanted to upgrade. Once I had the image stored, I deleted the partition on the SSD, did a clean install of Windows 7 64 bit and the new version of the presentation software. I then created an image of that. So now I can put either installation onto another drive and operate it immediately in that computer. In fact I then restored the old installation onto a 120GB hard drive I had lying about, and fitted that to the computer, so we can dual boot to the older setup if we have an unforseen problem while we're trialling the new setup.

 

I could have just cloned the original SSD to the hard drive, but I would have just had two drives with identical contents. By taking images, I still have the stored image file if it's needed. If I get a call tomorrow saying the SSD died, I can put the image of the new installation onto a spare drive, nip across to the church, swap it in and it's going again.


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#6 alankearn

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Posted 14 February 2015 - 09:40 AM

Cloning is creating an actual physical drive or partition identical to the original. There is nothing to copy or paste.

 

An image is a file containing an exact representation of a complete drive or partition (although it can be compressed, so be a smaller file than the volume it came from), and can be copied to other locations like any other file. But it's just a file, wherever you put it. To become a working drive again it needs to be restored to a drive using the imaging software that created it.

 

I have numerous images of drives from my and other people's computers in various configurations, stored on two USB external drives. I can restore these onto any drive that's large enough for it.

 

For example, one of the images I took last week is of the 120GB SSD from my church's computer. It was using Windows 7 32 bit and a superseded presentation software package we wanted to upgrade. Once I had the image stored, I deleted the partition on the SSD, did a clean install of Windows 7 64 bit and the new version of the presentation software. I then created an image of that. So now I can put either installation onto another drive and operate it immediately in that computer. In fact I then restored the old installation onto a 120GB hard drive I had lying about, and fitted that to the computer, so we can dual boot to the older setup if we have an unforseen problem while we're trialling the new setup.

 

I could have just cloned the original SSD to the hard drive, but I would have just had two drives with identical contents. By taking images, I still have the stored image file if it's needed. If I get a call tomorrow saying the SSD died, I can put the image of the new installation onto a spare drive, nip across to the church, swap it in and it's going again.

 

That is a brilliant explanstion for someone like me who is not anywhere near computer savvy.

 

Thank you very much






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