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Removing Vaio system from laptop


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#1 RobertWfr

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Posted 11 February 2015 - 06:37 PM

Hi All,

 

I have a question, would it be possible and practical to remove all the Viao software and reload my old Sony Viao with just Windows 7 ?

I think it may involve getting a new BIOs installed as well. What are your thoughts on this ?

 

The computer just keeps freezing so often making it difficult to get much work done. I have tried the Vaio self-heal module but it did not work. I have also used the built-in factory restore and just reinstalled a couple of programs but performance is still very bad. I also update the system at least once every 2 weeks.

 

I have a newer laptop now and want to use the older Sony Vaio to back-up important stuff and store old files.

 

Any suggestions ?

 

Regards,

Robert



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#2 hamluis

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Posted 11 February 2015 - 06:55 PM

Since you doh't know...what might be wrong with the older system...I have wonder why you would want to use it all, since you have a replacement.  As for backing up...I would think that the newer system would be be more reliable than the old...if not, then an external hard drive would seemingly be a better solution than an older, troubled computer system.

 

Louis



#3 RobertWfr

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Posted 12 February 2015 - 01:55 PM

Hello Louis,

 

For all practical purposes you are quite right of course.

 

It is just that for me a computer is not just a work tool, but something which I have an interest in, though I may not be very good at it. My point of view is that, barring hardware limitations and defects, a computer is a perfect machine which can do anything we want it to. We just have to get it right.

 

I have a strong hunch that the problems I have with my Sony Vaio is because of one or a combination of the following:

1) The Vaio system itself has bugs but was nevertheless released for distribution for financial reasons. When fixes/patches were later released the hardware was not up to providing the computing power needed to cope with it and at the same time handle the other programs running on the computer.

2) The Vaio system then did not integrate smoothly with Windows and other programs causing the processor to be overworked and freeze up.

 

I hope that by removing the factory installed software and installing an operating system that is compatible and within the scope of the hardware in the old laptop I will have myself an excellent auxiliary computer for whatever purpose I choose. 

 

Why I would waste all the time and effort to try and do that instead of just going out and buying an external hard drive, which would probably be much cheaper and less nerve wracking, is because of the pleasure and satisfaction it would bring me. The only true reason to do anything at all in life. :bananas:  :smash:  :love4u:

Cheers,

Robert


Edited by RobertWfr, 12 February 2015 - 02:24 PM.


#4 hamluis

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Posted 12 February 2015 - 02:35 PM

Well...I have several computers and I understand being zealous about tinkering :).

 

But...fooling around with a laptop (which, IMO, have built-in obsolescence) which may have hardware problems...is not my cup of tea (I am no tech, just another user with curiosity and a twinge of intelligence and willingness to read).

 

I wish you luck :).

 

Louis


Edited by hamluis, 13 February 2015 - 01:46 PM.


#5 RobertWfr

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Posted 12 February 2015 - 02:52 PM

Thanks Louis.

Any tips or pitfalls to look out for would be much appreciated.



#6 Aura

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Posted 12 February 2015 - 02:57 PM

Hi Robert,

I'm posting in this thread following the PM you sent me :) First of all, VAIO isn't a "system", but it's a "serie" of computer/laptop manufactured by Sony. The only difference is that VAIO computers and laptops comes with pre-installed VAIO software. But the Windows installed on it is the exact Windows installed everywhere else. These preinstalled software are called "OEM software", or "OEM bloatware" in certain case. They can all be uninstalled without any risk since they aren't part of a standard Windows installation. However, some of them are still useful to keep since they can help you manage the specific computer you have. If you want to re-load Windows 7 without the VAIO OEM bloatware, you have two options.
  • Do a clean installation of Windows 7 on your laptop. Which means that you'll end up with only Windows, no programs installed and missing a few drivers that you'll have to find and install (but this is easy, I can help you with that);
  • Do a Factory Reset on your laptop, which will reinstall the OS that came with it as well as reinstalling the OEM bloatware. Once done, you would have to uninstall the OEM bloatware you don't need, one by one;
I can assist you in both situations, let me know which one you want to go with.

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#7 cat1092

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Posted 13 February 2015 - 02:28 AM

 

 

  • Do a clean installation of Windows 7 on your laptop. Which means that you'll end up with only Windows, no programs installed and missing a few drivers that you'll have to find and install (but this is easy, I can help you with that);
  • Do a Factory Reset on your laptop, which will reinstall the OS that came with it as well as reinstalling the OEM bloatware. Once done, you would have to uninstall the OEM bloatware you don't need, one by one;

 

Sounds like a good plan to me, either one! :thumbup2:

 

Though if it were me, would choose #1 over #2, because drivers are available & a clean install will perform better over the 2nd option, which in the end may require more work. 

 

It's the bloatware, much of which the majority of us never uses, except for those of of who actually creates our recovery disk sets with the required app for that purpose. While it's still good for that purpose, much of the rest is well dated & some is a security risk also. For instance, few computers ships with the full Java client these days, though most all older versions did, should be among the first items removed & not replaced. We still have JavaScript, what we need to use our browsers, w/out the Full client installed. Therefore for most, the Full Java client normally is not needed, and all of mine were removed well over 2 years ago, getting close to 3. 

 

Also, any other software that would still be used today, such as Adobe Reader & Flash, needs a full removal & reinstalled freshly. And direct from the source, not 3rd party hosting sites, being sure to uncheck options for McAfee scans or Google software (Adobe must be desperate for cash to be bundling these). Due to so much adware being bundled into software, we cannot recommend even 'the best' 3rd party hosts. With Windows 7 or above, there is no need to install software for optical media burning, it's built into the OS, so that's one you can avoid. 

 

It's like Aura has stated above, unless there are hardware issues that we are unaware of, the computer would run a lot better with any useless junkware installed. With that age of a computer, less software is more, I have one that's a bit older, and discovered the same thing recently. Most all of the Dell software from the reinstall set is considered to be garbage today, as a longtime registered Dell customer, they were kind enough to send me a Vista reinstall DVD w/out the bundled software, along with an updated driver CD (Optiplex 740), though I ended up using a Windows 7 Home Premium OEM DVD & COA that I purchased at Newegg on promo sometime back, and reusing my Windows Anytime Upgrade from Home Premium to Ultimate COA (this is permitted) from a dead PC for a huge upgrade. 

 

Being that it has a physical TPM (Trusted Platform Module), this made Ultimate the right choice, to have an encrypted OS. Unfortunately, less systems ships with this option today than in the past, making BitLocker buggy on some systems. With a TPM, one is more secured & BitLocker works best. 

 

So that was my situation also, and was able to install many of the Vista 64 bit drivers in Compatibility Mode that were required for the computer to properly run.

 

As long as your copy of Windows 7 is legit & the rest of your hardware is sound, you can download a Windows 7 SP1 ISO of the same type that you have & activate with your COA, though that may not be the one printed on the bottom of the notebook. Use the one shown by Speccy, Belarc Advisor, or RW-Everything (this fishes the Windows key out of the BIOS chip, but may be the same as that of Speccy or Belarc Advisor), if the one on the COA isn't accepted. Be sure to have or create Recovery Media set for 'just in case' a clean install won't work. 

 

This doesn't cover everything, but is a start. Though I will advise that this is a lot of work, since you've stated in Post #3 that you're up to the task, just letting you know the way it is. You very well may get some satisfaction & lots of learning experience from this project, at a cost of time & effort. 

 

We're here for you, should you need us! :)

 

Good Luck!

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#8 RobertHD

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Posted 13 February 2015 - 06:26 AM

I dunno but i think its a RAM related problem and that can happen i think you need to start upgrading laptop ram.


Robert James Crawley Klopp


#9 RobertWfr

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Posted 18 February 2015 - 03:29 PM

Hi Guys,

 

Thanks for all the advice.

I would like to go with Aura's option #1 but don't know if I can because I did not receive an installation CD when I bought the laptop.

Please advise on this.

 

Thanks,

Robert






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