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True Power?


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#1 MaMister

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Posted 26 June 2006 - 06:58 AM

Can anyone tell me what is diff between the true power and non-true power atx power supply?

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#2 MaMister

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Posted 26 June 2006 - 07:41 AM

I got it, just want to share some knowledge....

http://www.cauniversity.org/node/333

;)

#3 pascor22234

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Posted 26 June 2006 - 01:02 PM

There are quite a few mistakes and misleading statements in the previous link.There is no such animal as "true power". There is power that is actually able to be delivered and then there are misleading specifications. Next, PFC is short for Power Factor Correction, non "Connection". Either way it is a near worthless capability for a power supply. It only matters for large appliances that draw very large of power from the mains.

There is not such thing as a "cutting" supply -- the term is a "switching" power supply.

The outputs of a power supply are called outputs, "rails" or voltages. The term "tension" is truly ancient.

The +5 volt output does not "save" the motherboard battery in any way. The battery will typically last 5 to 10 years no matter what.

This is very important: Although you can "trick" a power supply into turning on without its cable being plugged into a motherboard, you will not get accurate voltage readings this way because all switching power supply outputs must have a load on them to regulate properly.




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