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noob needs recomendations


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#1 bigrobifer

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Posted 08 February 2015 - 11:30 PM

I am attempting to teach myself c programming - just plain c as a foundation an will grow from there. I have a grasp of html5 an some css - enough to say go ahead and start with my chosen language before i get into PHP. I have never been anything but a windows user - mostly 7 but am now on win8. For personal reasons - alright mainly because the WBEM , but other reasons also- i want to get away from windows. So my requirements on which flavor to pick would be 1: written in C,  2: with a built in c compiler, 3:with built in Python support - my next language. And preferably with an advanced text editor.  And other than that as simple an OS as possible to minimize the learning curve. This will be a OS i use to teach myself C and it will be installed on my harddrive with a backup on a different partition in case i ruin my working/experimental distro. Although i'm not opposed to a livedisc i would prefer it on my hd.  although i'm not real sure if my hardware config will allow me to dual boot  I am posting this an then off to research my own answers but any answers or reasonable (what else would i get on this great site :thumbup2: ) replies are appreciated.

 

hp 15 notebook pc  x64 

intel celeron cpu n2830 

4GB RAM 

 

Capable of hardware vitualization but i keep it turned off / never installed installed hyper v. I'm ultimately trying to get off windows but want to learn c programming in the process so virtualizing a linux distro within windows would defeat my purpose i think. If any other specs are needed i can post but i figured this would be minimum need to know. thx.



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#2 TheDcoder

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Posted 09 February 2015 - 01:35 AM

Are you trying to dual boot?

 

(I think starting with Python is a better option as you have to grasp the basics of programming first... C has a lot more advanced stuff in it :wink:)


Edited by TheDcoder, 09 February 2015 - 01:37 AM.


#3 NickAu

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Posted 09 February 2015 - 02:29 AM

 

I think starting with Python is a better option

 

try this

http://www.java2s.com/Code/Python/CatalogPython.htm


Edited by NickAu, 09 February 2015 - 02:29 AM.


#4 bmike1

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Posted 09 February 2015 - 03:55 PM

all linux distro's come with a C compiler. I think it is called gcc which means 'gnu c compiler'. Most any language you want to learn has a compiler for it. You may have to d/l it but it is there. All you need is search

 

     Linux <desired language>

 

I got bored so I did a little searching:

http://docs.python-guide.org/en/latest/starting/install/linux/

http://www.developertutorials.com/how-to-install-php-5-on-linux-7-12-19/

http://lamphowto.com/

http://codecall.net/2014/07/30/5-best-free-css-editors-for-linux-system/

http://camendesign.com/code/how_to_learn_html5

http://shop.oreilly.com/product/0636920023487.do

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1132509/how-to-shift-web-development-from-windows-to-linux

and more....


Edited by bmike1, 09 February 2015 - 04:13 PM.

A/V Software? I don't need A/V software. I've run Linux since '98 w/o A/V software and have never had a virus. I never even had a firewall until '01 when I began to get routers with firewalls pre installed. With Linux if a vulnerability is detected a fix is quickly found and then upon your next update the vulnerability is patched.  If you must worry about viruses  on a Linux system only worry about them in the sense that you can infect a windows user. I recommend Linux Mint or, if you need a lighter weight operating system that fits on a cd, MX14 or AntiX.


#5 Guest_Kaosu_*

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Posted 17 February 2015 - 12:44 PM

  1. Select any popular distribution that has a thriving community to make solving common issues easier. I would suggest any of the popular distributions out there: Ubuntu, Mint, etc.
  2. I don't really believe in the whole opinion of starting with a more abstracted language to learn programming concepts. Choose whatever language interests you the most and start having fun. 
  3. You could use Code::Blocks as your IDE while learning C. Selecting an editor, IDE, etc. is a personal choice. Just try out the different options available and see what works for you.

Below is a small list of tutorials that I have found useful:

 


Edited by Kaosu, 17 February 2015 - 12:46 PM.


#6 Taikoh

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Posted 18 February 2015 - 10:31 PM

Whew, I wish you good luck! I'm still in the process of fully learning C, and even though I know numerous other languages, C is still just as hard as I'd imagined it--actually, it's just a bit harder!

 

As bmike1 said though, all Linux distros do come with a C compiler. However, GCC is the GNU C Compiler, which actually may not be installed on a few distributions by default Its grandfather though, the CC command, is almost paramount to Linux (since Linux kernels are built with CC) and works just fine if you're going to be learning C on a Linux distro. GCC is also platform-independent, so I'd recommend GCC if you've got it or can get it.

 

In line with Kaosu, I also recommend Ubuntu or Mint. They're excellent for transitioning into Linux, and I even still use Linux Mint (XFCE) for Android development.

 

In terms of my recommendation for learning C, I'm actually learning from a book titled "The C Programming Language, 2nd Edition" by Brian Kernighan and Dennis Ritchie and I'm loving it. Also, just as a fun fact, Dennis Ritchie is also the person who created/designed the C programming language; their book is essentially the "authoritative" guide on how to use C to the best of its ability. On the flip side though, it's insanely tough--almost anyone who learned C from that book will tell you that they still have nightmares about pointers and bitwise operators, myself included.  :wacko:

 

In all seriousness though, "The C Programming Language, 2nd Edition" is a fantastic read. If you do decide to check it out, make sure to do the exercises. They might cause much pain and suffering, but they'll get you thinking creatively and finding all kinds of non-compromising shortcuts in code. Heck, even if you don't learn from the book, I know a few people that still use the book itself for reference, even if only because it's just so darn thorough and transparent about itself.

 

To add actual usage statistics to the mix, I use Code::Blocks on Windows and Vim with CC on Linux when programming in C.



#7 NickAu

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Posted 18 February 2015 - 10:34 PM

 

Vim with CC on Linux

OMG I found somebody else that uses Vim.



#8 DeimosChaos

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Posted 18 February 2015 - 10:52 PM

 
Vim with CC on Linux

OMG I found somebody else that uses Vim.

Vim is awesome! I use it on a daily basis at work... well that or vi.

Give Ubuntu a look for the distro. You'll have to download gcc for it though. But it's easy and not a big deal.

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#9 bmike1

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Posted 18 February 2015 - 11:08 PM

my vote is to run Mint.


A/V Software? I don't need A/V software. I've run Linux since '98 w/o A/V software and have never had a virus. I never even had a firewall until '01 when I began to get routers with firewalls pre installed. With Linux if a vulnerability is detected a fix is quickly found and then upon your next update the vulnerability is patched.  If you must worry about viruses  on a Linux system only worry about them in the sense that you can infect a windows user. I recommend Linux Mint or, if you need a lighter weight operating system that fits on a cd, MX14 or AntiX.


#10 bmike1

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Posted 18 February 2015 - 11:15 PM

as for installing GCC it is so simple:

1- open a terminal [(with mint 17.1) <cntrl><alt> T]

2- type 'sudo apt-get install gcc' and press enter

3- enter root's password and press enter

4- after the prompt reappears it is installed

 

This is also how to install it in Ububtu though I am not sure how to open a terminal in ubuntu.


Edited by bmike1, 18 February 2015 - 11:15 PM.

A/V Software? I don't need A/V software. I've run Linux since '98 w/o A/V software and have never had a virus. I never even had a firewall until '01 when I began to get routers with firewalls pre installed. With Linux if a vulnerability is detected a fix is quickly found and then upon your next update the vulnerability is patched.  If you must worry about viruses  on a Linux system only worry about them in the sense that you can infect a windows user. I recommend Linux Mint or, if you need a lighter weight operating system that fits on a cd, MX14 or AntiX.


#11 NickAu

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Posted 18 February 2015 - 11:47 PM

 

I am not sure how to open a terminal in ubuntu.

Use CTRL-ALT-T or find it in dash on Ubuntu.






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