Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Dual Boot (Win 7 + Win 8.1)


  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 Bellzemos

Bellzemos

  • Members
  • 172 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:06:49 AM

Posted 08 February 2015 - 02:12 PM

Hello!

I have a laptop with a 500 GB HDD with Windows 7 OS. I use it primarely for the audio production but have problems with latency. It was said to me that Windows 8.1 would be a better OS for the audio production. So I would like to try if this is true.

I would like to set a "dual boot" configuration (old Windows 7 and new Windows 8.1) rather than use VMware since performance would lessen that way - I need all the resources available.

So I would take 60 GB from my HDD and dedicate it for the Windows 8.1 installation where I would test my audio interface, audio programs etc. I have a couple of questions though:

1. Could Windows 7 and 8.1 interfer between each other? What about the "hidden" partitions?

2. What about security? I would like to run Windows 8.1 without internec access, no anti-virus, so I can use all the resources. Can a potential threat go from Windows 8.1 to Windows 7 (if I would get some malware in some way)?

3. How to set dual boot in such way that when booting one option (Windows 7) is always selected except if I press a key at a certain time (and select Windows 8.1)?

4. How can I completely hide other drives in Windows 8.1 (only after the boot up in the Disk Management or is there another, better and more secure way)?

5. How to completely deny access to the internet (by disabling the network adapter (NIC) in the Windows 8.1 Device Manager or is there another, better way)?

6. Is it possible to later completely remove the new OS (Windows 8.1), remove it's boot option (so that the PC directly boots into the Windows 7, just like before) and also reclaim the HDD space that was taken by Windows 8.1?

Thank you!
 



BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


m

#2 Bellzemos

Bellzemos
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 172 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:06:49 AM

Posted 08 February 2015 - 06:09 PM

Anyone, please? :)



#3 TsVk!

TsVk!

    penguin farmer


  • Members
  • 6,230 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:The Antipodes
  • Local time:03:49 PM

Posted 08 February 2015 - 10:51 PM

Let me answer as best as I can...

 

1. The operating systems will run independently, in a perfect world they do not interfere with each other. Though there can be some minor issues.

2. You can run Win 8 just fine with no AV etc. if it is not networked. The possibility of malware coming the other way from your Win 7 installation is restricted to encryption and file infector type software. That can only occur if your Win 8 installation partition is mapped and/or available to Win 7.

3. You can change the initial boot OS and selection options by going to "Win start orb>right click "Computer">Properties>Advanced system settings>Startup and recovery "settings" button.

4. There is a way of editing the BCD to hide the partitions from the other OS's. That will cause them to "not exist" for each other. It was a long time ago since I did it though. You might do a search on that.

5. Disabling the NIC is the most effective way of disabling the internet. You will be able to go through and disable a pile of services also that are related to networking also, to improve performance. You might like to create a restore point before you start doing that.

6. Yes, yes and yes... plenty of tutorials available on this with a quick search.

 

I hope this helps.

 

:)



#4 Bellzemos

Bellzemos
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 172 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:06:49 AM

Posted 09 February 2015 - 10:10 AM

I helps a lot, thank you!

 

1. What kind of issues are possible?

2. So if I disable the drive names (C, D etc.) in the Admin. Tools, Comp. Manag., Disk Management then the drives can't be accessed from the other OS., right?

3. OK. Is that easy to reconfigure back to boot up directly into Windows 7 (without waiting or pressing keys) after I remove the Windows 8.1 installation completely?

4. BCD? Is that safe?

5. OK. I don't use system restore though, ever.

6. OK, great. Thank you! :)



#5 TsVk!

TsVk!

    penguin farmer


  • Members
  • 6,230 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:The Antipodes
  • Local time:03:49 PM

Posted 09 February 2015 - 04:27 PM

okey dokey...

 

1. Mostly you can see corruption or errors with the boot sector. It is pretty easy to fix, but you will need to enter a couple of commands on the command line. Sometimes people have difficulty when creating new partitions also. It's good to understand what you are doing before you start slicing up your disk. Read, read and read some more.

2. Hiding the disks by unmounting them with disk management will work as far as your OS goes. This is probably enough. Applications that can detect unmapped network shares may still detect them, and some can mount them. The only way I know to completely disable them is through the BCD. (though there might be something you can do through local policy and security settings to prevent access, just thought of that.)

3. Yes, same process... all the options are in that same settings window. Have a look.

4. Editing the BCD is relatively safe. You can always just create a new one if you screw it up. Helps if you have your instructions printed though, if you don't fully understand the process.

5. Use system restore. Turn it on. Now!. It is your number one failsafe against system corruption. Think about if the power tripped out right this moment, an brownout half power event for a few seconds before going off... you could be re-installing your OS and all of your applications rather than waiting 10 minutes for system restore to complete. It's free insurance. It would be foolish not to use it understanding this.

 

;)



#6 Bellzemos

Bellzemos
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 172 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:06:49 AM

Posted 09 February 2015 - 05:02 PM

How can I prevent corruption or errors regarding the boot sector? Why would these errors even occur?

 

I would create free space for Windows 8.1 installation within the Disk Management in Windows 7. And during the 8.1 installation I would choose that free space, partition it into the hidden 300 MB partition and a 50 GB C drive partition where 8.1 installs. What could go wrong?

 

I want to learn to avoid all the problems before I even begin with the whole dual-boot thing. Thank you for all you help!



#7 TsVk!

TsVk!

    penguin farmer


  • Members
  • 6,230 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:The Antipodes
  • Local time:03:49 PM

Posted 09 February 2015 - 05:28 PM

You can't necessarily avoid boot sector errors when installing dual operating systems. What happens most commonly (most common error) is that after installing a second OS the bootloader fails to recognise the initial OS installation. This is corrected by using the bootrec /rebuild command from the recovery environment, which will scan for additional OS's and add them to the boot manager. It's really not that big of a deal.

 

As far as partitioning goes you need to select the correct type of partition, make sure it is big enough, make sure the partition you are taking away from has enough room to give up that space. Just focus on what should happen rather than what could go wrong in this case. You would have already backed up all your essential data before doing this anyhow.

 

There's 100's of online tutorials on installing dual boot OS's. If you read 4 or 5 of them you should fully understand the process before you start out. Which it sounds you are well on your way down that path already.



#8 Bellzemos

Bellzemos
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 172 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:06:49 AM

Posted 09 February 2015 - 10:14 PM

OK, I hope that the bootloader error won't happen to me. If it happens and the bootloader won't see my original Windows 7 installation, do I fix it from the Windows 8.1 command line (since I won't be able to boot into the Windows 7)?

 

And the right type of partition for my need would be a basic simple, primary partition, right? 50 GB is more than enough for Windows 8.1 installation. And yes, I have more than 50 GB free on the partition I'll be taking away from and of course I would make a full system image backup, just in case all goes to hell. :)

 

Yes, I think I have covered more-or-less everything I need to know to run a dual-boot system. Thank you for all you help! :)



#9 TsVk!

TsVk!

    penguin farmer


  • Members
  • 6,230 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:The Antipodes
  • Local time:03:49 PM

Posted 09 February 2015 - 10:23 PM

Don't worry about the bootloader issue... really. Though the command line you use is loaded via an install disk, not through an active OS.

 

Right, right, right.

 

You're welcome

 

:thumbup2:






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users