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How can I clean up the interior of my notebook!!!


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15 replies to this topic

#1 Marioo

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Posted 02 February 2015 - 09:12 AM

I have vaio-sonny  model vpceb33fm  and wish some of you could put down some step to start cleaning the interior of my pc!!  Is it possible!!!



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#2 Aura

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Posted 02 February 2015 - 09:42 AM

Hi Marioo :)

The easiest way to clean the interior of a laptop is to remove the back panel (it's screwed, so take a screwdriver and remove all of them, one by one) and use a can of compressed air to blow out all the dust and dirt. You want to blow in a direction where the dust and dirt will go outside of the laptop without falling back in it. Also, you want to aim for the CPU, GPU, fans and cooling system since these are the primary components that can overheat and that make sure that your components are cooled down when in use. Also, check if your fans are working properly and that there's a good airflow going in and out of the laptop. This is pretty much it.

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#3 dc3

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Posted 02 February 2015 - 09:51 AM

If you do this, be aware that the screws may not be the same length.  To keep these in the order of where they were removed you can take a piece of paper, label it Front, and push the screws into the paper in the location it relates to the bottom of the computer.


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#4 Marioo

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Posted 03 February 2015 - 02:08 PM

Thanks for the tips!!



#5 Aura

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Posted 03 February 2015 - 02:08 PM

No problem Marioo, feel free to let us know how it goes! :)

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#6 Gmer99

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Posted 03 February 2015 - 06:05 PM

Hello , I use  my vacuum cleaner on low speed , and  i also use 2 heads  ear cotton buds , be carefull to use electro charged screw driver or damage some parts inside your laptop , do not use liquids or sanitary alcohol could damage or bleach some components , you can also change your CPU  termoconduction paste only if you have a new and better one there are those cleaning kits on market for CPU  old grease and dirt you can find on your CPU ... use only cleaning napkins to remove it with slow movements from middle to edge , good luck  :bubbles:



#7 Aura

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Posted 03 February 2015 - 06:07 PM

I would avoid using a vacuum cleaner to be honest, since there's a good chance that you might suck in the jumper, without which you'll probably make your motherboard unusable. You can use a vacuum cleaner everywhere else on the case, just not on a motherboard or close to it. Also, a vacuum cleaner is more efficient on an open computer case than a closed laptop since dust and dirt can be hidden in small holes that the vacuum cleaner won't be able to access.

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#8 dc3

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Posted 03 February 2015 - 06:16 PM

I would avoid using a vacuum cleaner to be honest, since there's a good chance that you might suck in the jumper, without which you'll probably make your motherboard unusable. You can use a vacuum cleaner everywhere else on the case, just not on a motherboard or close to it. Also, a vacuum cleaner is more efficient on an open computer case than a closed laptop since dust and dirt can be hidden in small holes that the vacuum cleaner won't be able to access.

I'll go one step further, and probably the most important reason for not using a conventional vacuum cleaner, it is a static electricity generator.  You don't need to make contact with a board component, it can arc from a 1/4" away.  I'm talking about enough voltage to take out ICs.  There are vacuum cleaners make specifically for this type of application.  I would suggest using one of these.


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#9 Aura

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Posted 03 February 2015 - 06:17 PM

You're right, a single static shock on a motherboard can remain it unusable, forcing you to buy a new one. So I would definitively avoid doing a such thing, and stop doing it if you were (Gmer99).

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#10 dc3

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Posted 04 February 2015 - 10:00 AM

This is getting a little off topic, but I feel that this is important enough to add to this.

 

I'm sure that almost all of us have walked across a carpet in the winter, reached out to touch a doorknob and received a painful shock.  This is an electrostatic discharge.  There is a voltage threshold where the shock becomes painful, that is at 2,000 Volts!  It only takes 10 Volts to kill a integrated circuit (IC) on a RAM module, motherboard, or any other component with ICs installed in it.

 

You can reduce the risk of this by discharging the static electricity in your system before touching anything inside the case.  This is easily done with a desktop.  The power cord has a three prong plug.  One of these prongs is the ground which grounds the case of a desktop computer.  To discharge any static electricity all you need to do is touch the bare metal of the case after it has been opened.


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#11 Aura

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Posted 04 February 2015 - 10:07 AM

There's also anti-static bracelets that exists specifically for tasks like these, here:

https://www.google.ca/search?q=anti-static+bracelet&espv=2&biw=1920&bih=947&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=qzXSVJrVE7C1sQSTzILQDg&ved=0CAYQ_AUoAQ

But with your trick, I guess it won't be needed :)

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#12 Queen-Evie

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Posted 04 February 2015 - 10:43 AM

When using compressed air make sure to ALWAYS hold the can upright.
If inverted, it can be let out as a liquid which can cause severe damage to your computer.
It is also cold-freezing cold-when it leaves the can. Do NOT let frost form on any of the components.

#13 JohnC_21

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Posted 04 February 2015 - 10:51 AM

I would like to add one more suggestion. Never spin up  fan blades with the compressed air. This can induce a current back into the motherboard or card. Hold the blade with the wooden handle of a small brush or popsicle stick.



#14 dc3

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Posted 04 February 2015 - 11:10 AM

I would like to add one more suggestion. Never spin up  fan blades with the compressed air. This can induce a current back into the motherboard or card. Hold the blade with the wooden handle of a small brush or popsicle stick.

This is basic electronics.  All it takes is a switching diode in series to stop any feedback.  I would be astonished to learn that this isn't a industry standard practice.

 

Placing a something through the blade of the fan to keep it from spinning is important though.  The bearings used in these fans are not the best, allowing the fan to spin can shorten the lifespan of the fan. 


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#15 JohnC_21

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Posted 04 February 2015 - 11:25 AM

Thanks for that clarification on that dc3. I did some research on cleaning out computers awhile ago and came across different threads about reverse current from spinning the blades. The bearing reason makes more sense.






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