Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

CPU Overheating During Video Rendering


  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 iflytoohigh

iflytoohigh

  • Members
  • 12 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:04:24 PM

Posted 28 January 2015 - 11:01 PM

Greetings!

I recently got a premade desktop (specifically a Cyberpower PC) for my birthday 3 months ago, and while it functions for the basic uses that I need, I've noticed that its temperatures have been getting quite hot while rendering videos in Cyberlink Powerdirector 11.

While idling, my CPU temp reads in Piriform Speccy are between 22-26 degrees Celsius, with the temperatures reaching ~40 degrees while browsing and doing minor things online. When rendering videos of any size, length, or type, my CPU temp reads skyrocket to 80+ (although CPU usage doesn't go beyond 70%), which has led to it shutting down once due to overheating. It doesn't have any problems while running games like DotA 2 (temp reads are between 45-55), and otherwise it functions nicely.

I guess my basic question is this--is there any way for me to somehow limit my CPU temperature when it's rendering videos? After it had overheated the first time, it ran things very slowly for an entire day, but I noticed that it wouldn't let rendering temps go over 60 degrees (but the length of time that it took to render the files was tripled). For whatever reason after a fresh restart, it returned to normal where it would allow the temperatures to get quite high again. Needless to say, I've stopped rendering videos, at least until I can figure out a solution for this.

Regarding my PC specs, I've attached my DxDiag output, just in case this is helpful to anyone willing to help me troubleshoot and brainstorm this issue. Also worthy of noting, I have tried adjusting the affinity of the program via Task Manager, and regardless of how many processors I tick/untick, it doesn't change how hot the CPU gets when rendering--the only change that occurs is that it takes the files longer to be rendered.

One final comment--I have tried tinkering with settings in Cyberlink Powerdirector 11 regarding the hardware acceleration function. I've rendered videos both with hardware video encoding enabled and disabled, and the only difference is how long it takes the files to render. The temperatures still get quite hot with either setting.

Thank you so much for any insight you can provide. My ultimate hope is to just limit the temperature, even if it doubles or triples the time that it takes for the files to render.

xx

Attached Files



BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 ranchhand_

ranchhand_

  • Members
  • 1,670 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Midwest
  • Local time:04:24 PM

Posted 29 January 2015 - 04:10 PM

Standard desktop retail computers are not geared for constant, top level ongoing stress, and video rendering does just that. For the last several years I have built using only liquid-cooling units and it makes a huge difference. Video rendering is actually done by the CPU, not the video card, so the CPU is doing all the heavy lifting. My suggestion is that the next rendering you do, open the side of the case and put a window (box) fan blowing in at highest speed. An alternative are these smaller, very high velocity desk fans that really shoot a concentrated stream of air although they are only about 10" in diameter. See if that makes a difference. My guess is that it will and that tells you the problem. Inadequate cooling unit for what you are doing.


Help Requests: If there is no reply after 3 days I remove the thread from my answer list. For further help PM me.


#3 YeahBleeping

YeahBleeping

  • Members
  • 1,258 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:05:24 PM

Posted 29 January 2015 - 08:00 PM

Get a better cpu cooler I would guess the one you have in there is stock.  You don't necessarily need water cooled anymore as there are many cpu coolers now that are ' almost ' as good as water cooling.  I have a water cooled system too but the one I recently built for myself is not.  And I dont miss the pump humming in my ear at all.

 

And get some arctic silver to replace the probably gluey crap that is on the stock cooler.


Edited by YeahBleeping, 29 January 2015 - 08:05 PM.


#4 ranchhand_

ranchhand_

  • Members
  • 1,670 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Midwest
  • Local time:04:24 PM

Posted 29 January 2015 - 09:47 PM

Interesting.  I guess it depends on the manufacturer of the cooling unit. My CoolIT ECO-R120 I got from Newegg 5 years ago is so quiet I can barely hear it running-just a whisper and my computer is on my desk 24" away. Dropped my CPU temps 10-15°C. I generally pay pretty close attention to the users' reviews at Newegg and Amazon and at that time it was getting great reviews and many commented how quiet it was. From there on I use only liquid cool units and have never had a problem. I have a drawer full of old heatsinks and fans that were too loud.


Help Requests: If there is no reply after 3 days I remove the thread from my answer list. For further help PM me.


#5 YeahBleeping

YeahBleeping

  • Members
  • 1,258 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:05:24 PM

Posted 29 January 2015 - 10:00 PM

Don't get me wrong ranch ... My water cooled dual core system is still running like a boss after hmmm almost 13 years now? I built my water cooled system before there were the fancy stuff you can get nowadays.  But the fact remains that current air coolers have come a LONG way and can do the job without water.

 

http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c225/darkmane/wiring_fancontrol.jpg

 

http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c225/darkmane/pump_side.jpg



#6 Datcoolguy

Datcoolguy

  • Members
  • 303 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:07:24 PM

Posted 31 January 2015 - 06:53 PM

If it's a premade you might void the warranty by just opening the case. Have you asked your supplier about it?


"If you don't understand how your computer works, you shouldn't be messing with it!"


#7 iflytoohigh

iflytoohigh
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 12 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:04:24 PM

Posted 01 February 2015 - 11:12 AM

Sorry for the delay in thanking those of you who took the time to reply. I've been sick with the flu, so I just haven't had the energy to even boot this bad boy up.
 

 

Standard desktop retail computers are not geared for constant, top level ongoing stress, and video rendering does just that. For the last several years I have built using only liquid-cooling units and it makes a huge difference. Video rendering is actually done by the CPU, not the video card, so the CPU is doing all the heavy lifting. My suggestion is that the next rendering you do, open the side of the case and put a window (box) fan blowing in at highest speed. An alternative are these smaller, very high velocity desk fans that really shoot a concentrated stream of air although they are only about 10" in diameter. See if that makes a difference. My guess is that it will and that tells you the problem. Inadequate cooling unit for what you are doing.

Thanks for the suggestions! I'm going to give this a try to see if there's any change. And, like you noted, if I do see significantly better results, it's clearly an issue with my subpar stock cooler. :/ How unfortunate! Do you have any recommendations for specific coolers that may work with my PC based on my specs? Or, does it not really matter?
 

 

Get a better cpu cooler I would guess the one you have in there is stock.  You don't necessarily need water cooled anymore as there are many cpu coolers now that are ' almost ' as good as water cooling.  I have a water cooled system too but the one I recently built for myself is not.  And I dont miss the pump humming in my ear at all.

 

And get some arctic silver to replace the probably gluey crap that is on the stock cooler.

Oh, thank you for the idea of trying a new thermal paste. In addition to seeing if the stock cooler is the issue, this is something else I should probably look at as well. Thank you! I wouldn't have even thought to try that. Do you have any suggestions for specific cooler brands/models?
 

 

If it's a premade you might void the warranty by just opening the case. Have you asked your supplier about it?

I did give Cyberpower PC a call about the computer overheating, and they said I'm free to send it in if I want them to look at it. However, they said that it sounds like it's doing what it's supposed to (I can run all of my other programs just fine, it's simply video editing that is causing problems). :/ This PC was a gift from my mom, so I guess I didn't expect her to know what sorts of specs to look for. I appreciate the PC, but I think I'll eventually need to upgrade quite a few parts to it, so I don't think the warranty even matters at this point, sadly. :( I'm thinking I'll need to just have my dad help me replace the stock cooler with something better.



#8 ranchhand_

ranchhand_

  • Members
  • 1,670 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Midwest
  • Local time:04:24 PM

Posted 01 February 2015 - 01:58 PM

I strongly suggest that you try my test suggestion before making any decision, it could save you time and money.  if you do not see any improvement at all your problem may not be your cooler. If you do see improvement, that is a strong indicator that you need an improved cooling system.

 

I have not investigated liquid cooling recently and the particular model of my unit is no longer made (although the company still is in business). With any purchase I make I always go online and read users' reviews. That gives you a pretty good idea of how a unit performs and if there are any problems. I use Newegg and Amazon for this usually.

This cooling unit is getting top reviews; be sure to read carefully, reviewers can warn you about problems as well as good points.

Here is a general listing from Newegg.

Here is Amazon's listing of the Nepton 240M (compare it to Newegg).

One thing you want to check....make sure it will fit your mainboard socket.


Help Requests: If there is no reply after 3 days I remove the thread from my answer list. For further help PM me.


#9 witneyl

witneyl

  • Members
  • 1 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:05:24 PM

Posted 03 November 2015 - 01:29 PM

Hello,

 

I have a AMD FX-8357 8-core CPU, motherboard GIGABYTE GA-990FXA-UD3, 24 GB memory, NVIDYA GeForce 9500 GT video card with 1 GB memory, liquid cooling system, with 2 fans on the coller itself, and 2 huge fans on the case .

 

Every single time I try producing something with CyberLink PowerDirector 13, when doing a low quality video CPU temp goes up to 65-70 C. When producing HD quality video CPU temp goes above 80 C and my computer shuts down.

 

I ran a test with Pinnacle Studio 12 using the same input and the same type of output, and my CPU temp has never gone over 55 C

 

I've had the ticket open with CyperLink for 2 weeks now. I've waited for over a week for them to respond after submitting files they've requested. Ended up dowing my own tests and telling them about my results as well. Still waiting for response.

 

So if your CPU is overheating while producing with CyberLink Power Director, I do not think it is your computer problem, i strongly believe it's the software

 

 



#10 hamluis

hamluis

    Moderator


  • Moderator
  • 56,090 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Killeen, TX
  • Local time:05:24 PM

Posted 03 November 2015 - 04:32 PM

To iflytoohigh:

 

FWIW:  I have an FX 8320 in this system and my experience (with stock cooler) was that the temps when rendering would hit the upper 70s, lower 80s...but my system never shut down or produced any symptoms of overheating.  The fan would get loud, which annoyed me, but no system prolbems.

 

The specs for that processor indicate that anything over 62 Celsius is cause for alarm...but I don't find that to be so...I've been running this CPU for several years now and the temp when rendering video has always exceeded the stated maximum safe operation temp.  And my system has never emitted any warnings or given any indication that there was problem...it was the fan noise which indicated that the processor was under stress.

 

I replaced the thermal paste/grease, along with a new stock heatsink/fan...and the temps have gone down to a point where rendering temps are in the upper 60s and the fan noise has lessended and I don't worry about it.

 

I believe Ranchhand has offered the most expedient, easy solution.  I bought several replacement heatsink/fan combinations with the idea of replacing the stock heatsink/fan (Artic Freezer Pro, EVO T4)...but I have not found it necessary to change the heatsink/fan.  I don't care if the operating temp routinely exceeds the stated max...as long as the system works properly over a prolonged period of time.

 

My system runs with the case covers off but I don't think that in itself is a huge factor.

 

IMO, the suggestion of water-cooling is something that I believe is a little overboard for the actual result.  It may be an acceptable solution for you because you stated that your system shuts off from overheating...but I believe that simply replacing the stock cooler with an EVO 212 or similar would give you greater peace of mind.  For me...that's too much work for the result...for you, that may be the best solution.

 

Louis






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users