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Faster apt-get on Debian Linux


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#1 NickAu

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Posted 23 January 2015 - 07:16 PM

To enable parallel downloads and make your apt-get work much faster.

 

Edit (or create) the apt.conf file:

sudo vim /etc/apt/apt.conf

Add the following line, then save.

Acquire::Queue-Mode "host";

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#2 bmike1

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Posted 24 January 2015 - 03:55 PM

for those that don't know buntu is a derivative of Debian. This should work on buntu systems as well.


A/V Software? I don't need A/V software. I've run Linux since '98 w/o A/V software and have never had a virus. I never even had a firewall until '01 when I began to get routers with firewalls pre installed. With Linux if a vulnerability is detected a fix is quickly found and then upon your next update the vulnerability is patched.  If you must worry about viruses  on a Linux system only worry about them in the sense that you can infect a windows user. I recommend Linux Mint or, if you need a lighter weight operating system that fits on a cd, MX14 or AntiX.


#3 NickAu

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Posted 24 January 2015 - 05:25 PM

 

This should work on buntu systems as well.

It will work on Ubuntu as you see in my screenshot.



#4 cat1092

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Posted 25 January 2015 - 02:54 AM

It doesn't work for those with Linux Mint 17.1, based on Ubuntu 14.04. 

 

Here's the Terminal output. 

 

sudo: vim: command not found
 
It's a great deal to have though, as long as the OS can use it. 
 
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Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#5 bmike1

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Posted 25 January 2015 - 03:05 AM

it worked for me and I run 17.1 . try 'sudo vi ...' 

if I remember correctly vim is supposed to be linked to vi. actually the way I think I read it is 'vi is a link to vim'.


Edited by bmike1, 25 January 2015 - 03:18 AM.

A/V Software? I don't need A/V software. I've run Linux since '98 w/o A/V software and have never had a virus. I never even had a firewall until '01 when I began to get routers with firewalls pre installed. With Linux if a vulnerability is detected a fix is quickly found and then upon your next update the vulnerability is patched.  If you must worry about viruses  on a Linux system only worry about them in the sense that you can infect a windows user. I recommend Linux Mint or, if you need a lighter weight operating system that fits on a cd, MX14 or AntiX.


#6 bmike1

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Posted 25 January 2015 - 03:08 AM

or use 'sudo pico...' or any old text editor you want to use. You can  even use gedit if you would like.


Edited by bmike1, 25 January 2015 - 03:12 AM.

A/V Software? I don't need A/V software. I've run Linux since '98 w/o A/V software and have never had a virus. I never even had a firewall until '01 when I began to get routers with firewalls pre installed. With Linux if a vulnerability is detected a fix is quickly found and then upon your next update the vulnerability is patched.  If you must worry about viruses  on a Linux system only worry about them in the sense that you can infect a windows user. I recommend Linux Mint or, if you need a lighter weight operating system that fits on a cd, MX14 or AntiX.


#7 NickAu

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Posted 25 January 2015 - 04:18 AM

To install vim

sudo apt-get install vim

After installing vim run

vimtutor

from the commandline you'll get "a 30 minute tutorial that teaches the most basic Vim functionality "

 

Another Vim tutorial here.

http://www.openvim.com/tutorial.html

 

And more here.

http://www.yolinux.com/TUTORIALS/LinuxTutorialAdvanced_vi.html

 

 

if I remember correctly vim is supposed to be linked to vi. actually the way I think I read it is 'vi is a link to vim'.

 

vim is almost a proper superset of vi. So, everything that is in vi is available in vim. Vim adds onto those features.


Edited by NickAu, 25 January 2015 - 04:39 AM.


#8 cat1092

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Posted 25 January 2015 - 04:37 AM

Got it going, but now it's just sitting there with no way for me to exit, if I close the Terminal it says there's a process running. 

 

Went all the way down by holding the 'l' key. 

 

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#9 NickAu

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Posted 25 January 2015 - 04:50 AM


 

Got it going, but now it's just sitting there with no way for me to exit,

Hold down ESC-Shift-Z

 

There is a  saying, " I've been using Vim for about 2 years now, mostly because I can't figure out how to exit it."

 

 

 

I close the Terminal it says there's a process running. 

 

Yes there is, It's vimtutor when that box pops up just hit close terminal.


Edited by NickAu, 25 January 2015 - 05:40 AM.


#10 Al1000

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Posted 25 January 2015 - 10:32 AM

Vim (or vi) is an advanced text editor, and not necessary for simple file editing (or creating). I would use nano.

sudo nano /etc/apt/apt.conf
How to edit (or create) a file using nano

Edited by Al1000, 25 January 2015 - 10:36 AM.


#11 Al1000

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Posted 25 January 2015 - 10:41 AM

or use 'sudo pico...'


You will find that pico is a link to nano. :)

#12 Guest_hollowface_*

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Posted 27 January 2015 - 07:59 PM

Vim (or vi) is an advanced text editor, and not necessary for simple file editing (or creating). I would use nano.
 

 

 

Yes, I too prefer Nano. I cannot stand using Vim.



#13 cat1092

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Posted 28 January 2015 - 02:33 AM

Haven't used it yet, there was a long lesson in the Terminal that many will never remember. 

 

Fortunately, Nick provided a link above as to how to use it. At this point, I cannot say whether or not I'll stick with Vim, but will give it a fair shot. Many worthwhile technologies aren't learned on the first try, rather several over a period of time. Actually with this one, practice makes one better. 

 

While I like the old fashioned text editors, and for good reason, they're easy to use, it's also great for Linux users to have modern choices. Regardless of the outcome (whether or not I'll stick with Vim), it's encouraging to see Linux developers taking the time to make these type of offerings available for the advanced user. It takes a lot of time to develop these apps, and many times, the developer gets nothing, or very little in return for their countless hours of work, unless they're one of the select few employed by the Free Software Foundation, where there is no salary negotiation. 

 

So that we can be free to use the OS of our choice at no cost, and have the same or better tools to work with as many licensed OS's that over the years, adds up to be a small fortune over 3-4 releases. 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#14 Al1000

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Posted 28 January 2015 - 04:16 AM

Yes, I too prefer Nano. I cannot stand using Vim.

The first time I tried using vim (or it might have been vi) I had the same problem as Cat and Nick mentioned, and had to look up the internet just to find out how to get out of it.

Then I started using nano and found it much easier, and it has been my "go-to" text editor ever since. Excepting on Puppy, which doesn't have nano (or pico) and the choice is vi or a gui text editor. I too cannot stand using vim (or vi), so on Puppy I use the gui.

Edited by Al1000, 28 January 2015 - 04:17 AM.


#15 Al1000

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Posted 28 January 2015 - 04:27 AM

While I like the old fashioned text editors, and for good reason, they're easy to use, it's also great for Linux users to have modern choices.

Between vim and nano, nano is the more modern and easier to use option.

I gather than there are some advanced things that vim (and vi) can do, that nano cannot do, and so while the former might be more suitable for developers and programmers, nano is designed to be able to more easily do everything that the rest of us might use a text editor for.

There is an approximately 100 page introduction to vim, vi and emacs advanced text editors in A Practical Guide To Linux Commands Editors and Shell Programming that you posted a link to here. I started reading it and found it hard to get to grips with, and bearing in mind that I am unlikely to need to use an advanced text editor for anything, skipped the whole chapter.




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