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Laptop shuts off at 40% battery life when unplugged


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#1 RushSonic

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Posted 22 January 2015 - 11:59 PM

Hello, I have run into a frustrating and weird issue with my laptop. For the past few days, when I try to use my computer on the battery only, everything is fine and then it suddenly shuts off. It just goes black and I can't turn it on until I plug in the adapter. This leads to me having to log in again. If I didn't save, then I end up losing my work.

 

I talked to the Samsung Tech Support and they suggested resetting the settings in the BIOS configuration. However, this issue still occurs. I do not want to do a Recovery install just in case there's a hardware problem. I have run Chkdsk to see if there is anything wrong with the hard drive but the result said the filesystem had no errors. When I checked the Intel Rapid Storage Technology window, it said the hard drive was fine. The hard drive did not make any noises either. What could be causing this problem? I've ruled out malware too.

 

Model - Samsung Ativ Book 6 (NP680Z5E-X01US)

OS: Windows 8.1

Memory: 8 GB (1 Stick) DDR3

Hard Drive - 1 TB (SAMSUNG Spinpoint M8 ST1000LM024)

Video Cards - AMD Radeon HD 8600/8700M & Intel HD Graphics 4000 (Switchable Graphics cards)

 

 



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#2 JohnC_21

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Posted 23 January 2015 - 09:22 AM

See this blog. Run the powercfg /batteryreport. It will create a HTML file and show your battery capacity. You can also run the other powercfg commands listed. How old is the battery?



#3 RushSonic

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Posted 23 January 2015 - 04:18 PM

I ran powercfg /batteryreport yesterday. Do you want me to add the results to this thread?

 

I also ran powercfg -energy.

 

The computer is about a year old.

 

This is the installed battery:

 

BATTERY 1 NAME SR Real Battery

MANUFACTURER SAMSUNG Electronics

SERIAL NUMBER 123456789

CHEMISTRY LION

DESIGN CAPACITY 57,456 mWh

FULL CHARGE CAPACITY 34,960 mWh

CYCLE COUNT 1183


Edited by RushSonic, 23 January 2015 - 04:19 PM.


#4 JohnC_21

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Posted 23 January 2015 - 05:16 PM

It looks like the battery is losing it's ability to charge to full capacity. With a Cycle Count of 1183 I would say your battery is nearing end of life.

 

The last item in this section is called Cycle count. The Cycle Count is a number that refers to how much the battery is used. A single load cycle is the cumulative usage of 100% of the batteries capacity. For example, discharging to 50%, charging to full, then discharging to 50% the next day will equal 1 load cycle (or draining/recharging it 25% four times). Batteries have a limited amount of cycles to work through before they are considered consumed. Maximum cycle count varies depending on a number of factors, but generally pre 2010 batteries are designed for 300-500 cycles. Newer batteries can be designed for 500-750 or in some cases even 1,000 cycles.

 



#5 RushSonic

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Posted 23 January 2015 - 06:17 PM

That is very unfortunate. Guess I'll have to get the service manual and replace the battery. I would rather not send it to Samsung because that will take time and I'll have to pay them to do it.

 

Do you have any advice to make these laptop batteries last longer? Or is a lifetime of about 1 year the norm?


Edited by RushSonic, 23 January 2015 - 06:18 PM.


#6 JohnC_21

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Posted 23 January 2015 - 06:36 PM

It usually depends on how many times the battery is charged. I usually take the battery out of the laptop and run it on the power adapter if I do not plan on taking it anywhere. The battery on my son's laptop lasted about two years. But, this all depends on how easy it is to remove the battery. Fortunately on the laptop I just push a switch a pop it out.

 

I bought a generic battery on ebay after I found the correct part number. Some people believe it best to purchase an OEM battery but I never had trouble with mine. The OEM battery may have better Quality Control. I made sure to purchase from a seller that had at least a 99% approval ratings. The ultrabook you have may be hard to replace the battery. I know on a Windows Surface Pro, it is freaking impossible. I did a quick Google search and I could not find anything regarding a battery for you notebook.

 

Edit: I found this manual.

 

http://www.manualslib.com/manual/540177/Samsung-Ativ-Book-Np680z5ex01us.html?page=100

 

 
Precautions
Users cannot remove or replace the internal battery. To remove or replace the battery, use an authorized service center in order to protect the product and users. You will be charged for this service.

 


Edited by JohnC_21, 23 January 2015 - 06:41 PM.





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