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Is this a good build - Motherboard Concerns


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#1 sam000lee

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Posted 22 January 2015 - 04:44 PM

Hi all this is my first post thanks in advance!

It's been a while since my last computer which is now about 7 years old and I'm starting from scratch. After shopping around a bit, I am currently leaning towards this deal from NewEgg.

 

My needs are not super heavy - most likely no games - but I do need a fair amount of processing power to perform large Matlab calculations and was thinking of upgrading to 16gb ram. 

 

Here is what I am looking for:

1. Quadcore CPU

2. 8gb RAM or higher

3. SSD + some extra

4. Video card capable of dual monitors

 

Basically something not too excessive but that will be able to handle some heavier stuff if need be and that will last/not become obsolete for a while.

 

I am a little skeptical of the motherboard of the package above, and a bit of the case both of which have gotten some bad reviews. Basically I am a little worried about receiving a dead motherboard and then it being costly/annoying.

 

The last question is probably a stupid one but hooking up the USB, phone jacks, etc. to the case is trivial right?



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#2 DJBPace07

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Posted 23 January 2015 - 07:44 AM

AMD quad-core systems with FX processors aren't traditional quad core CPU's due to their unique architecture.  You may want to consider a system based off an FX-8000 CPU.  Based off benchmarks I have seen with the FX-8150 here you may be better off going with an Intel system. 

 

When it comes to motherboards, I would aim for an Asus or Gigabyte motherboard.  If you are planning on using the FX CPU's, you should get a motherboard that supports an AMD 900 series chipset since these are designed from the ground up to handle FX whereas earlier models offer basic compatibility.  If you are going to be using more than one graphics card, you should use an AMD 990FX chipset.

 

What is your budget and are you going to be building this yourself?


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#3 sam000lee

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Posted 23 January 2015 - 11:52 AM

Thanks for the reply. I will be putting everything together myself and my budget is $500 for the tower and everything inside - hence the non-intel CPU which I believe would make fitting that budget a little more tricky. I'll only want one graphics card, preferably one that can handle two monitors.



#4 DJBPace07

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Posted 26 January 2015 - 07:43 AM

Modern GPU's can easily handle two monitors, even integrated solutions with sub-4K resolutions.  Even on an AMD system, I would suggest upping your budget a little.  The reason why that package Newegg offers is so affordable is that the CPU is very low-end and the motherboard is too.  I've also never heard of that power supply manufacturer before and it doesn't include an operating system.  You could probably get a decent system at the $700 to $800 range. 

 

Case:  Antec Sonata III 500 - This includes both a mid-ATX case and 500W power supply.  This is an inexpensive case.  $119

 

Motherboard:  GIGABYTE GA-H97-D3H LGA 1150 Intel H97 - Because you aren't going to be gaming, you don't need a dedicated graphics card.  Therefore, you can use the on-board graphics on the processor.  $94

 

CPU:  Intel Core i5-4690 Haswell Quad-Core 3.5GHz - Since you aren't gaming, you can put a little more money into the CPU.  $224

 

RAM:  Crucial 8GB 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 - This is a single stick of DDR3 RAM.  Later on, you can easily upgrade to a higher capacity if you wish.  $66

 

ODD:  ASUS DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS - A basic optical drive.  $19

 

OS:  Windows 8.1 OEM 64-bit - You need an operating system.  $99

 

HDD:  WD BLACK SERIES WD2003FZEX 2TB - This is a standard HDD.  $124

 

(Optional) SSD:  SAMSUNG 850 EVO-Series MZ-75E120B/AM 2.5" 120GB SATA III - If you get this, use it to store the OS and a few of your most frequently used programs.  $91

 

Grand Total:  $751 (Doesn't include shipping, taxes, or optional equipment)


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#5 sam000lee

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Posted 28 January 2015 - 06:39 PM

It seems like the build mentioned above is similar to this: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16883113303

I know this is going to seem condescending - so I'll preface by saying I don't mean to sound that way at all - but besides the SSD in the build DJBPase suggests, the Gateway Tower is almost equivalent, and almost $200 less. Am I missing something (again not to sound arrogent) but what would be the advantage in the previous build when there are more affordable, and seemly equally powerful computers?

 

Again thanks and sorry for any 'provocative' language!



#6 YeahBleeping

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Posted 28 January 2015 - 07:53 PM

Hi ... you don't have to apologize for your questions that is why your here. But lets be clear... AMD chips are budget processors are they good? Sure.  But I would only put them in a machine meant for business client side use.

 

Why?  Because for sheer processing power you cannot beat Intel.  They have been and will always be on top when it comes to number crunching cycles per second to a comparable AMD chip.

 

Take a look here.  Even the lowest speed Intel I-5 quad core processor is much faster than the AMD in your newegg build.

 

Its just the way it is.  I understand you said you would probably not use this system for gaming and the program you mentioned makes me think you need processing power to use it.  So I suggest this build.  It may be more than you want to spend... but you want to be happy with your system ... amIrIght?



#7 DJBPace07

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Posted 29 January 2015 - 06:19 AM

There is no need to apologize.  AMD CPU's are good for budget-oriented gaming rigs, especially the FX-8300 series, but to a point.  For Matlab, I think the number of instructions per cycle would be a more important factor and Intel wins here too.  If you have the extra cash to spend, I would go for Intel.

 

The Gateway build does cut costs in a few areas, a lesser processor, a lower quality (And probably lower-end) motherboard, less RAM, smaller case with a less powerful PSU, and less storage space.  It's not a huge step down, but it is a downgrade.


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#8 Bluefusion012

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Posted 15 February 2015 - 03:21 AM

At this stage in history intel always wins. What is ur previous system? Just a off the wall sugguestion... but Hey here it goes...

 

If u can't jump into the modern era, why not go into the previous era High end? Snag a decent Mobo from back then and Overclock the ba-jesus out of the quad core, And Buy the Extra's you'll need to build ur main future system slowly? Only the Motherboard, graphics card, and ram is specific to the modern era. U can still chuck expensive graphics cards, use High end periphials, and whatnot in those old clunkers. I can play pretty modern games and do some pretty intensive things with my old Q-9300...( Skyrim, elder scrolls online, Black light retribution, Startrek Online, Fallout new vegas, Dying light, Dark souls 1 and 2 , spore galactic adventures, sims 4, Dolphin game cube emulator (which is a really intense program on processors)

 

I'm building my new system here in a few months based off of just building up parts and getting bye. in a few weeks I'll be putting my order in for my i7 4790k and a bunch of other things. But I already have a nice screen, headphones, power supply, Disc drive, 125mb/s internet, and piles of fans ready to go, graphics card,hard drives etc.

 

Besides, Broadwell is coming out with it's chips here at april first. Buying a System now, before seeing what could be... seems premature.

 

But hey, don't let us tell you what to do. if thats what u wanna get, then Get it.

 

My sugguestion tho is to either build up to ur big purchase or get into bed with something you can build upon. preferably intel.


Edited by Bluefusion012, 15 February 2015 - 03:25 AM.


#9 sam000lee

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Posted 16 February 2015 - 02:13 PM

Cool. A lot of helpful comments thanks everybody! Here's what I've put together based on some of the comments here, it would be great to hear some opinions on the build!

 

Western Digital HDD - $57

 

Kingston SSD 120gb - $60

 

GSKILL ripjaw DDR3 Memory 8gb - $57

 

This Combo. Includes i5-4440 Processor, Asus Motherboard and Rosewill MicroATX tower + power supply - $300

 

Windows 8 - $99

 

 

For a total of $576.

 

I have most peripherals so am only really concerned with the tower for now!



#10 sam000lee

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Posted 16 February 2015 - 02:39 PM

As for what I have now - It's an intel q6600, I have a 500 gb HDD that is full, 4gb memory, a Nvidia GeForcce 8400 GS and this Gigabyte motherboard.

It has served me well and was originally very fast but I've had it upwards of seven years now and everything is pretty worn out.



#11 YeahBleeping

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Posted 16 February 2015 - 06:43 PM

My only other advice is that in the BIOS settings for the motherboard you should have the option to choose how much memory is reserved for the onboard video.  I suggest giving it all you can.  Usually a maximum of 1 to 2 gb.  That will improve gameplay.  Keep in mind that doing so will take memory away from windows so when you go in to see how much ram you have you have to subtract the video memory from your installed memory and it should come close to how much memory is actually available to windows.



#12 Bluefusion012

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Posted 16 February 2015 - 09:01 PM

Cool. A lot of helpful comments thanks everybody! Here's what I've put together based on some of the comments here, it would be great to hear some opinions on the build!

 

Western Digital HDD - $57

 

Kingston SSD 120gb - $60

 

GSKILL ripjaw DDR3 Memory 8gb - $57

 

This Combo. Includes i5-4440 Processor, Asus Motherboard and Rosewill MicroATX tower + power supply - $300

 

Windows 8 - $99

 

 

For a total of $576.

 

I have most peripherals so am only really concerned with the tower for now!

 

 

Lose the Operating system cost. Everyone knows how to :P, and yeah 400 something dollars. Very nice build for that amount. Remember if you want to go even further with ur Processor, Deliding is always an option :D and it costs 12 bucks to reduced ur temps by 25 c and 3 hours of ur time if you do it carefully. which gives u even better OC rates and longevity on the chip ( due to lower temps) and hey it'd prolly be just as good as a standard i7 4770 if not better



#13 DJBPace07

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Posted 18 February 2015 - 09:39 AM

You need the OS.  You also probably don't need to de-lid your CPU.  Get a good air cooler and you should be fine if you want to do a more modest overclock.  Be careful with the case though, it may not have the airflow needed for higher-end coolers and GPU's.


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#14 killerx525

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Posted 18 February 2015 - 10:10 AM

In regards to the overclocking of the CPU, the i5-4440 has very limited overclocking capabilities due to the multipliers being locked and the CPU being a non-K variant. Spending extra on a unlocked CPU is not worth the cost, as with all CPU overclocking, there is no guarantee that you will achieve those high frequencies. The Haswell i5 is a powerful microarchitecture that can pack a punch for most users and pushing that extra performance may have little to no benefits in a typical PC environment, let alone the fact that a beefy cooling unit is needed and the risk of damaging the CPU itself. If the OP is not comfortable with overclocking, then it should be left alone and the budget itself is already tight to include a decent cooling unit.


Edited by killerx525, 18 February 2015 - 10:21 AM.

>Michael 
System1: CPU- Intel Core i7-5820K @ 4.4GHz, CPU Cooler- Noctua NH-D14, RAM- G.Skill Ripjaws 16GB Kit(4Gx4) DDR3 2133MHz, SSD/HDD- Samsung 850 EVO 250GB/Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB/Seagate Barracuada 3TB, GPU- 2x EVGA GTX980 Superclocked @1360/MHz1900MHz, Motherboard- Asus X99 Deluxe, Case- Custom Mac G5, PSU- EVGA P2-1000W, Soundcard- Realtek High Definition Audio, OS- Windows 10 Pro 64-Bit
Games: APB: Reloaded, Hours played: 3100+  System2: Late 2011 Macbook Pro 15inch   OFw63FY.png





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