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IT jobs for seniors


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#1 paul88ks

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Posted 21 January 2015 - 01:38 AM

I'm in a peculiar situation. I am turning 60 in April. By profession I have been a musician all of my adult life(piano and keyboards) but have been working on computers since 2000. I still work 3-4 days a week at night in clubs and 2 church services on Sunday. I am currently a full time caretaker of my 86 year old mother and have to be home a lot for this reason. As I  said earlier, i have quite a bit of knowledge about computers- I'm always fixing or building machines for friends and word of mouth contacts for a small fee. I am considering getting my certs in A+ and Net+ to have some credentials i can show an employer.I don't think I am ready for the rest home yet and wonder if you guys think I should pursue this.Comments welcome- opinions welcome!! 



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#2 TechnicianOnline

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Posted 21 January 2015 - 02:30 AM

Paul!

 

Let me just tell you right now this is the place to be! Aside from the little "physical" work we Techs do which ends up to a easier living (although it will drive you crazy sometimes from the mental strain), it's also very rewarding and nothing is better than to take on ANOTHER passion in life. We all have it, working on the Computer, fixing things and figuring out complex problems that baffle the average Joe.

 

That being said, I'd chase after the A+ cert and get the official training as well from CompTIA, if you get the bundle you save money and most importantly TIME. This is a less than $500 investment to YOU, YOURSELF and your CAREER. 

 

Hope you jump and keep at this Paul, keep us updated and any questions you have shoot it here!


Edited by TechnicianOnline, 21 January 2015 - 02:31 AM.

A Network isn't something you 'own' or 'have'; you may only wield it like the sword of Excalibur.


#3 paul88ks

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Posted 21 January 2015 - 02:47 AM

Paul!

 

Let me just tell you right now this is the place to be! Aside from the little "physical" work we Techs do which ends up to a easier living (although it will drive you crazy sometimes from the mental strain), it's also very rewarding and nothing is better than to take on ANOTHER passion in life. We all have it, working on the Computer, fixing things and figuring out complex problems that baffle the average Joe.

 

That being said, I'd chase after the A+ cert and get the official training as well from CompTIA, if you get the bundle you save money and most importantly TIME. This is a less than $500 investment to YOU, YOURSELF and your CAREER. 

 

Hope you jump and keep at this Paul, keep us updated and any questions you have shoot it here!

Thanks Tech- that's encouraging!



#4 Kilroy

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Posted 21 January 2015 - 06:27 AM

It is not very expensive to get A+ and Network+ certified, as TechnicianOnline said you can do it for less than $500.  If you have a firm foundation I recommend the Exam Cram books.  They skip the fluff and get you the information you need to pass the certifications.  I also recommend the Transcender practice tests.  They cost almost as much as the actual test, but they will make sure you pass.  With the actual test if you fail you have to pay to retake the exam, so it is up to you.  I find I actually learn more form the practice tests than the books as you will quickly learn the "keys" to the questions, if you see "this word" then you need to look for "that answer".

 

As for it you should pursue it, that is really up to you.  You will run into age discrimination and you will be starting at the bottom.  Neither of these is a reason not to do it, but you need to be aware.  You can at least get the interviews by structuring your resume to not show that you have so much life experience, after that it is up to you.  Unfortunately too many companies don't value older workers.

 

Doing IT work professionally is different than doing it for friends and family.  Licensing is the biggest challenge for most people to understand.  Just because it is free for personal use doesn't mean that it is free for commercial use.



#5 ShamrockCS

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Posted 01 February 2015 - 01:20 PM

Hi Paul,

 

I'm in a somewhat similar circumstance so perhaps I might be able to offer something of value. I've been working on computers since 1993, so I too have a solid background. I also owned a company dealing with a field of technical measurement and engineering that relies heavily on computers for 11-years. When I left I took a 9-year "break" and drove a shuttle bus for something to do. Due to some health concerns I'm no longer able to drive and needed to do something else. With my background I thought IT would be a natural fit. I was able to get both my A+ and Network+ Certifications and thought I'd be able to find work relatively quickly. That has not been the case, and it may not be for you either. I'm in my mid-50's so not that far behind you. After a ton of applications that haven't generated a single call or email, I've decided to go it alone and start another business. If you're already doing the work why not get paid for it? Technibble.com is a site for independant IT people. You might check it out as they have many resources and advice to offer. Just something to consider. I was a caregiver for my mother too, and a home-based computer repair business might just work for you.



#6 paul88ks

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Posted 01 February 2015 - 09:36 PM

Thanks Shamrock - that hits the nail on the head and is exactly my situation- I will check out the Website!

Hi Paul,

 

I'm in a somewhat similar circumstance so perhaps I might be able to offer something of value. I've been working on computers since 1993, so I too have a solid background. I also owned a company dealing with a field of technical measurement and engineering that relies heavily on computers for 11-years. When I left I took a 9-year "break" and drove a shuttle bus for something to do. Due to some health concerns I'm no longer able to drive and needed to do something else. With my background I thought IT would be a natural fit. I was able to get both my A+ and Network+ Certifications and thought I'd be able to find work relatively quickly. That has not been the case, and it may not be for you either. I'm in my mid-50's so not that far behind you. After a ton of applications that haven't generated a single call or email, I've decided to go it alone and start another business. If you're already doing the work why not get paid for it? Technibble.com is a site for independant IT people. You might check it out as they have many resources and advice to offer. Just something to consider. I was a caregiver for my mother too, and a home-based computer repair business might just work for you.



#7 paul88ks

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Posted 01 February 2015 - 10:21 PM

 

Thanks Shamrock - that hits the nail on the head and is exactly my situation- I will check out the Website!

Hi Paul,

 

I'm in a somewhat similar circumstance so perhaps I might be able to offer something of value. I've been working on computers since 1993, so I too have a solid background. I also owned a company dealing with a field of technical measurement and engineering that relies heavily on computers for 11-years. When I left I took a 9-year "break" and drove a shuttle bus for something to do. Due to some health concerns I'm no longer able to drive and needed to do something else. With my background I thought IT would be a natural fit. I was able to get both my A+ and Network+ Certifications and thought I'd be able to find work relatively quickly. That has not been the case, and it may not be for you either. I'm in my mid-50's so not that far behind you. After a ton of applications that haven't generated a single call or email, I've decided to go it alone and start another business. If you're already doing the work why not get paid for it? Technibble.com is a site for independant IT people. You might check it out as they have many resources and advice to offer. Just something to consider. I was a caregiver for my mother too, and a home-based computer repair business might just work for you.

 

They say that it is against the law to discriminate because of age,but employers find ways to get around that . Like you said,they just don't answer your application. i actually work a lot as a musician at night, and I worked for Nordstrom for ten years as a piano player,but they fired all the musicians in 2010, and that cut into my income substantially- went through my 401k and my unemployment. I don't mean to whine and complain- LOL- I just need to get my income back to where it was- 



#8 ShamrockCS

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Posted 01 February 2015 - 10:32 PM

Hi Paul,

 

I was denied disability, though that is/will be the result of my illness. My unemployment has also run out, so my options are slim as well. I can't say that it's an age thing for me as I've not even had an interview. I don't see the point in getting worked-up over things that I cannot change, and few really care about. What matters is how I handle myself, so that's what I work on. I don't do that perfectly by any stretch, but I try to. Do your friends/family have you work on their computers because your good, or because you're free? You'll find out quickly. ;)



#9 paul88ks

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Posted 01 February 2015 - 10:50 PM

No, my family members always give me something for my time, and I DO charge for my friends, but at a very competitive rate- they usually will hire me over a quote professional because my rates are cheaper - and- they know me,so they trust me. I will do a "freebie" if its something minor- like a loose cable. One time I had a friend who called me and told me his computer wouldn't  boot- so I went over to his house and found that he hadn't plugged in the monitor. He felt really stupid so I didn't charge him for that one-






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