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360 Total Security??


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#1 TheHappyOne

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Posted 18 January 2015 - 04:43 PM

Hi everyone,
 
I know I have not been on here for a long time.
 
My OS is Windows 7 Home Premium.
 
I would like some advice please, please could you kindly let me know what you think of 360 Total Security?
I have been watching video reviews on it and it seems really good, however some comments I have read suggest that people are worried about how the information is collected and used.
360 Total security is FREE, if it is FREE how do the make money and how are they able to provide it for FREE?
Here is the link to their website if you would like to check out the website. http://www.360totalsecurity.com/en/about.html
I ask this question, as I would like to start using it. :)
 
I have been using Avast FREE Antivirus, but that seems to be causing slowdown and makes my PC sluggish.
 
I hope this helps, thank you in advance for your help and advice, I really appreciate it and look forward to hearing from you soon. :)
 
Kind Regards
 
TheHappyOne

Edit: Topic moved from Windows 7 to the more appropriate forum.~ Animal

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#2 dante12

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Posted 18 January 2015 - 04:56 PM

Should be good. As I know there're using the Bitdefender and Avira Databases: I have no experience with Qiho myself but I've red and heard they're many satisfied with them.

 

http://www.av-comparatives.org/dynamic-tests/

 

http://www.majorgeeks.com/files/details/360_total_security.html

 

I know and you should know too, that every tests and reviews mirroring the experience of that user that have install Qiho 360. So you should self try how good is it for you.



#3 quietman7

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Posted 18 January 2015 - 06:26 PM


If you have not done so already, you may want to read: Choosing an Anti-Virus Program
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#4 PcPhoenix

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Posted 18 January 2015 - 06:47 PM

Free right now doesn't mean it will be free forever. They may have a paid "pro" version in the future. They also proably collect information about you and use it for unknown purposes.

All AV software slows down and destabilizes your computer. To compete with the viruses and rootkits that they're supposed to prevent, AV software installes itself on your computer in incredibly intrusive ways. Prior to 64-bit OS's becoming popular, AV software would commit dozens of hooks and patches to various kernel functions in the hopes in intercepting malware. Problem is that the malware was right there with them patching whatever it wanted in kernel-space, so it wasn't long before ring 0 turned into a battleground and major source of sysem instability.

Once 64-Bit became populare and CPU's had some new features, Windows came with something called PatchGuard, which now protects kernel-space memory (code & structures) from any modifications from malware or AV software, and began mandating code-signing for all drivers. Malware writers didn't complain or even make a peep about these changes, whereas AV companies threw a massive tantrum and even thought about suing Microsoft because they thought Microsoft's own AV products were going to have special access into kernel-space that they would not.

McAffee published a paper where they discussed how easily PatchGuard and revealed a new bypass method, making it likely that they, as well as other AV's, are all still hacking their way into your kernel to get the power they want.

When you consider the rather massive performance losses, incredibly invasive maneuvers that lead to system instability, false flags, notifications, advertisements, errors, sketchy data collection, sketchy broweser plugins and addons, you should ask yourself what the difference really is between AV software and viruses themselves (besides the fact that many people pay good money to voluntarily have AV's molest their computers).

Luckily, you can avoid all of the above drama by simply not using any AV and just followinga few good rules:

1) Use either Firefox or Chrome. (or just use Opera and hope that Russian exploit writer Sergei Ivanovich forgot you existed)

2) Keep your software up to date. Most software these days is good at bugging you to update it. Do it. Your browser, Flash, Java, Adobe Reader plugins, and your OS.

3) Don't download sketchy things off the internet.

It's surprisingly easy to keep your computer clean and free of viruses without resorting to using an anti-virus solution, which is something i think more people should consider.

EDIT: And considering the fact that Microsoft has been doing a fine job releasing it's own AV software that you can download for free on Windows without any toolbars or other nonsense, I strongly advice people to just use whatever solution Microsoft has provided and avoid shady AV companies.


Edited by PcPhoenix, 18 January 2015 - 06:57 PM.


#5 quietman7

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Posted 18 January 2015 - 07:09 PM

...All AV software slows down and destabilizes your computer.

I disagree with that statement. There are several anti-virus solutions which leave a small footprint...meaning they are not intrusive and do not utilize a lot of system resources.

I also do not agree with recommending folks not use any anti-virus solution. While there are some who follow best practices for safe computing, the majority of our members are novice users who do not follow them.

Many of today's attackers employ advanced techniques which involve sophisticated Botnets, Backdoor Trojans and rootkits to hide their presence on a computer. Without proper security tools including an antivirus which can detect such malware, novice users can never be absolutely sure their computer has not been infected.

Among the ~800 pages of new threat intelligence is a new study that attempts to quantify the benefit of running up-to-date anti-virus (AV) software. The study leveraged data from over a billion systems worldwide and it turns out that systems that do not have up-to-date AV are 5.5 times more likely to be infected with malware than systems that are protected...

Anti-virus Software is Dead...Really?

...if you are counting on your antivirus to save you or your co-workers from the latest threats, you may be in for a rude awakening down the road. Does this mean antivirus software is completely useless? Not at...antivirus remains a useful — if somewhat antiquated and ineffective — approach to security. Security is all about layers, and not depending on any one technology or approach to detect or save you from the latest threats.

Antivirus is Dead: Long Live Antivirus!

Why should you use Antivirus software?IMO, not having an anti-virus working in real-time in the background defeats much of its intended purpose...to protect a computer and prevent malware infection BEFORE it can damage your system.
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#6 Aura

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Posted 18 January 2015 - 07:14 PM

If you are to use one of Qihoo's products, do not use Total Security. Total Security comes with useless features that I like to call "bloat", since they won't add anything more to your system and even maybe slow it down. Qihoo 360 TS comes with "PC Booster" features, the same features all these shady PC Boosting programs offers when telling you that they can speed up your system performance, and such. None of these programs are worth using and none of these actually work like they should. If you want your system to perform at an optimal level, you'll have to manage it manually, by doing your own tweaks. This can be done by learning how the Windows OS works and doing the proper modifications on it. Therefore, if you are to use a Qihoo product, I would go with Qihoo 360 IS since it doesn't include the useless, bloated features of Qihoo 360 TS that would slow down your system more than anything, or even harm it in someway.

But maybe did we start by asking the wrong questions as well. Is it possible for you to provide us your computer specs, as well as what kind of Antivirus product you would like to switch to, free or paid?

And concerning your main question, which is the worry about Qihoo's products recolting user data and "using" it, keep in mind that Qihoo is a Chinese product, and without being biased, with eveverything that see today in the news, it's a reasonable doubt to question Qihoo's legitimacy when it comes to their product and what they do with the data they collect. That's pretty much all I have to say about it.

Free right now doesn't mean it will be free forever. They may have a paid "pro" version in the future. They also proably collect information about you and use it for unknown purposes.

All AV software slows down and destabilizes your computer. To compete with the viruses and rootkits that they're supposed to prevent, AV software installes itself on your computer in incredibly intrusive ways. Prior to 64-bit OS's becoming popular, AV software would commit dozens of hooks and patches to various kernel functions in the hopes in intercepting malware. Problem is that the malware was right there with them patching whatever it wanted in kernel-space, so it wasn't long before ring 0 turned into a battleground and major source of sysem instability.

Once 64-Bit became populare and CPU's had some new features, Windows came with something called PatchGuard, which now protects kernel-space memory (code & structures) from any modifications from malware or AV software, and began mandating code-signing for all drivers. Malware writers didn't complain or even make a peep about these changes, whereas AV companies threw a massive tantrum and even thought about suing Microsoft because they thought Microsoft's own AV products were going to have special access into kernel-space that they would not.

McAffee published a paper where they discussed how easily PatchGuard and revealed a new bypass method, making it likely that they, as well as other AV's, are all still hacking their way into your kernel to get the power they want.

When you consider the rather massive performance losses, incredibly invasive maneuvers that lead to system instability, false flags, notifications, advertisements, errors, sketchy data collection, sketchy broweser plugins and addons, you should ask yourself what the difference really is between AV software and viruses themselves (besides the fact that many people pay good money to voluntarily have AV's molest their computers).

Luckily, you can avoid all of the above drama by simply not using any AV and just followinga few good rules:
1) Use either Firefox or Chrome. (or just use Opera and hope that Russian exploit writer Sergei Ivanovich forgot you existed)
2) Keep your software up to date. Most software these days is good at bugging you to update it. Do it. Your browser, Flash, Java, Adobe Reader plugins, and your OS.
3) Don't download sketchy things off the internet.

It's surprisingly easy to keep your computer clean and free of viruses without resorting to using an anti-virus solution, which is something i think more people should consider.

EDIT: And considering the fact that Microsoft has been doing a fine job releasing it's own AV software that you can download for free on Windows without any toolbars or other nonsense, I strongly advice people to just use whatever solution Microsoft has provided and avoid shady AV companies.


You have some good points, however BleepingComputer is a forum where you mostly see non-experienced users coming to ask for help and advice. Without insulting them, I know that these users won't be able to use a system properly without an Antivirus protection as a first layer of defense. Hence why I recommend, and I always will recommend, these users to use a decent Antivirus protection on their system. There's an Antivirus product for every computer and its user, all you have to do is find that product. Simple as that.

Edited by Aura., 18 January 2015 - 07:16 PM.

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#7 quietman7

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Posted 18 January 2015 - 07:43 PM


Qihoo is a Chinese-based provider of free security and Anti-virus software (360 Total Security, 360 Internet Security, 360 Browser, 360 Security, 360 Mobile Safe, 360 Vault, etc). There has been a lot of controversy surrounding Qihoo to include it's reporting other anti-virus software and search tools as being malicious, deceptive marketing practices and various privacy issues.
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#8 TheHappyOne

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Posted 19 January 2015 - 06:17 AM

Hi everyone, 

 

I would just like to say thank you all so much for all your replies.:)

 

Hi Aura, to answer your query:

 

1. I use AVAST FREE Antivirus at the moment.

I would like to use a FREE Antivirus Program.

 

2. My OS is Windows 7 Premium 64 bit.

 

I am staying away from Qihoo now thanks everyone.:)  



#9 Aura

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Posted 19 January 2015 - 06:21 AM

Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bits is your OS, not your computer specs :P The specs we are interested mostly is the CPU and RAM. You can see such information by right-clicking on Computer and select Properties. The System information window will open, and the CPU/RAM will be displayed in it.

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#10 Sintharius

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Posted 19 January 2015 - 06:40 AM

Luckily, you can avoid all of the above drama by simply not using any AV and just followinga few good rules:
1) Use either Firefox or Chrome. (or just use Opera and hope that Russian exploit writer Sergei Ivanovich forgot you existed)
2) Keep your software up to date. Most software these days is good at bugging you to update it. Do it. Your browser, Flash, Java, Adobe Reader plugins, and your OS.
3) Don't download sketchy things off the internet.


Just that isn't enough - a lot of malware nowadays infect unsuspecting visitors of legit sites. Without resident AV protection you will never know that you are infected - especially zero-day malware.

Anything else is already covered by Moderator quietman7.

#11 TheHappyOne

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Posted 19 January 2015 - 07:08 AM

Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bits is your OS, not your computer specs :P The specs we are interested mostly is the CPU and RAM. You can see such information by right-clicking on Computer and select Properties. The System information window will open, and the CPU/RAM will be displayed in it.

Hi Aura, 

 

Sorry my bad  :P my specs are:

 

1. Processor AMD E-350 Processor 1.60 GHz

 

2. Installed Memory (RAM) 4.00 GB (3.50 Usable)

 

3. 64 bit Operating System

 

May I say that I am very careful with what I download and when surfing the net.

 

May I ask what FREE AV would you recommend?

 

1. Avira FREE?

 

2. Bitdefenda FREE?

 

3. AVG FREE?

 

Thanks again. :)

 

TheHappyOne :) :P



#12 quietman7

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Posted 19 January 2015 - 07:52 AM

May I ask what FREE AV would you recommend?
 
1. Avira FREE?
 
2. Bitdefenda FREE?
 
3. AVG FREE?

I would recommend avast! Free Antivirus or Bitdefender Anti-virus Free Edition. Keep in mind that all free Anti-virus programs now come with toolbars or other bundled software except Bitdefender Free...see Has the antivirus industry gone mad?!


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#13 Aura

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Posted 19 January 2015 - 08:11 AM

From what I heard from a friend who's into hardware, the AMD E-Series was pretty bad, so I could understand that you have a certain difficulty running a few applications on your system. My personal pick would be to either stay with avast! Free or move to Avira. I have personal experience with Bitdefender that makes me not want to recommend it, and as for AVG, there's many reasons to not use it, first one being that it'll try to make you install a lot of useless programs that you don't need and it's a shame that an Antivirus company does that. This is only my own opinion, the final choice is yours :) I suggest to take a look at quietman's recommendations as well, since he knows way more than me on that subject :wink:

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#14 quietman7

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Posted 19 January 2015 - 04:27 PM

From what I heard from a friend who's into hardware, the AMD E-Series was pretty bad, so I could understand that you have a certain difficulty running a few applications on your system...

I can confirm that. After having a couple AMD systems years ago, I decided never again.
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#15 Aura

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Posted 19 January 2015 - 05:20 PM

From what I heard from a friend who's into hardware, the AMD E-Series was pretty bad, so I could understand that you have a certain difficulty running a few applications on your system...

I can confirm that. After having a couple AMD systems years ago, I decided never again.


That's good to know :P I think he also meant the E-300 series, and the OP's CPU is straight into that serie. I always avoid that CPU when looking for laptops for people that ask me to help them shop for one.

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