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Canada prohibits installation and/or update of software without user consent - S


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#1 NickAu

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Posted 17 January 2015 - 11:49 PM

A new provision in Canada’s Anti-Spam Legislation (CASL) prohibits tech cos from installing software without consent from the device’s owner
All those tech companies providing auto update for their software products can take a hike.  At least in Canada.  According to the new rule which kicked in from yesterday introduced by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission, no software can be installed and/or updated without the users explicit consent.
The new rule applies when someone installs or causes the installation of software on another individual’s device in the course of commercial activity. The CASL said that it had noticed websites automatically install software on visitors’ computers without their consent. Often these installs are seen to be malware and adware.
The new ruling includes the installation of software/malware which is bundled with a legitimate applications, or the installation of concealed software from music CDs, the commission said. For example online downloads of software include concealed or cleverly camouflaged toolbar or search software which are often irritating and can classify as adware.

http://www.techworm.net/2015/01/canada-prohibits-installation-andor-update-software-without-user-consent.html
 
 
Please explain without the users explicit consent. Will this mean I now have to tick a box to install ask toolbar instead of un ticking it?


Edited by NickAu, 18 January 2015 - 12:01 AM.


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#2 Sintharius

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Posted 18 January 2015 - 03:33 AM

Isn't that better, Nick?

Allowing the user to tick the box instead of making them untick it would be good in the fight against PUPs.

(nobody would tick them, period.)

#3 ianmcqui

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Posted 18 January 2015 - 04:40 AM

Yes I real pain sometimes, having then to uninstall the unwanted program.

 

I just got a Mcaffee snanner by accident the other day on a recently fresh copy of Windows because I needed Adobe reader!

 

Had only been online with it a couple of times so very annoying to say the least and my fault totally, I usually study the page and all it's options before clicking 'next', but in a hurry that day.

 

Avast are also guilty of this too with an unwanted Chrome installation, is it possible to make a list of all the software vendors who do this and what to look out for with any particular install?

 

Regards, Ian.



#4 frankp316

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Posted 18 January 2015 - 05:35 AM

Typical CRTC stupidity to try and regulate the internet. This is unenforcable and doesn't kick in until 2018 anyway. They recently tried to regulate Netflix too and Netflix told them to get lost. The CRTC is a joke.



#5 cat1092

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Posted 18 January 2015 - 05:37 AM

This ought to be brought up in the US also, we're hit by more spyware/malware attacks than any country in the world. 

 

+1! for Canada! :thumbup2:

 

Unfortunately, in the US, this won't happen. Microsoft & the big OEM's, which distributes much of this 3rd party junk, is deep into politics. 

 

Fortunately, at least for now, we have a choice that will help to get rid of these check boxes, and they worked on both an XP & Windows 7 install, blocking Google Chrome & their toolbar for IE, and some switch to a shady home page/search engine. 

 

Introducing Unchecky, an automated app that does this for us, but keep in mind, nothing is foolproof, and it's still the personal responsibility of the user to watch & make sure that what's not wanted is unchecked. 

 

http://unchecky.com/

 

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Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#6 cat1092

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Posted 18 January 2015 - 05:49 AM

Typical CRTC stupidity to try and regulate the internet. This is unenforcable and doesn't kick in until 2018 anyway. They recently tried to regulate Netflix too and Netflix told them to get lost. The CRTC is a joke.

 

As far as enforcement goes, in most modern countries, it takes time anyway, it's not like the leader over the country can sign a law into stone on 24 hour's notice. 

 

This is the type of regulation that consumers needs, to assume that they don't want extras, otherwise they'd be visiting those sites. Who wants Open Candy, Ask & Google Toolbars, Coupon software, search page changes w/out asking & more? The citizens have stood up and progress is being made. 

 

Netflix is a different story, it's users volunteers to view the content, and it's not free. This is about cleaning up the Internet, a step in putting these shady 3rd party developers out of business. Most everything that comes bundled, with a few exceptions, is indeed shady at best. 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#7 Sintharius

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Posted 18 January 2015 - 05:50 AM

Avast are also guilty of this too with an unwanted Chrome installation, is it possible to make a list of all the software vendors who do this and what to look out for with any particular install?


There is the Installers Hall of Shame for that.

#8 ianmcqui

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Posted 18 January 2015 - 09:25 AM

 

Avast are also guilty of this too with an unwanted Chrome installation, is it possible to make a list of all the software vendors who do this and what to look out for with any particular install?

There is the Installers Hall of Shame for that.

 

Thanks for that and quite a compilation, didn't realize there were so many!

 

Regards, Ian.



#9 Phantom010

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Posted 18 January 2015 - 11:42 AM

"Free" software developers need to make a living too. Everybody expects a free meal! Those annoying PUPs are bundled as a way for the developers to put food on their table. Generally, you can simply remove the check marks and nothing but the desired software will be installed. If people paid attention while installing software, they wouldn't flood the malware removal forums. I personally prefer that alternative to having to pay... It only takes a few clicks.

 

Please explain without the users explicit consent.

 

That's what the boxes are for...


Edited by Phantom010, 18 January 2015 - 11:43 AM.


#10 frankp316

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Posted 18 January 2015 - 11:45 AM

 

Typical CRTC stupidity to try and regulate the internet. This is unenforcable and doesn't kick in until 2018 anyway. They recently tried to regulate Netflix too and Netflix told them to get lost. The CRTC is a joke.

 

As far as enforcement goes, in most modern countries, it takes time anyway, it's not like the leader over the country can sign a law into stone on 24 hour's notice. 

 

This is the type of regulation that consumers needs, to assume that they don't want extras, otherwise they'd be visiting those sites. Who wants Open Candy, Ask & Google Toolbars, Coupon software, search page changes w/out asking & more? The citizens have stood up and progress is being made. 

 

Netflix is a different story, it's users volunteers to view the content, and it's not free. This is about cleaning up the Internet, a step in putting these shady 3rd party developers out of business. Most everything that comes bundled, with a few exceptions, is indeed shady at best. 

 

Cat

 

 

 

 

Baloney! This is a well meaning but not enforcable law. And if they try to enforce it, all it will do is cost Canadian taxpayers like me money. The CRTC has tried unsuccessfully to regulate the internet in the past. It can't be done.

 

 

 

The story on Netflix is they can't be regulated in Canada because they are not a traditional broadcaster. A lot of the content on Netflix in the US is unavailable in Canada due to rights issues. The rights are owned by Rogers, Bell and Shaw. Many Canadian Netflix subscribers get around this by using a US address. This is against Netflix terms of service. But the CRTC wants to protect Canadian rights holders so they wanted Netflix to allow themselves to be regulated. Netflix refused and is attempting to regulate themselves. So in Canada, we pay the same for a lesser version of Netflix. Plus Bell started Crave at $4 per month and Rogers and Shaw started Shomi at $10 per month. This means that if a Canadian wants to legally access all the content that is on Netflix in the US, we have to pay for all three of these services. Ridiculous!



#11 Aura

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Posted 18 January 2015 - 12:22 PM

Does this only applies for websites and software that are in Canadian soil, or for every websites and software that are being visited/installed by Canadian users?

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#12 frankp316

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Posted 18 January 2015 - 06:41 PM

The latter and that's why it's not enforcable. Look, this "law" is a public relations exercise so the CRTC can brag about how they are serving the Canadian public when the truth is they are in the back pocket of Canadian broadcasters. 



#13 Aura

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Posted 18 January 2015 - 08:22 PM

Why wouldn't that be enforceable? Also, there must be a way to report software, websites that doesn't respect that policy, no? Also, I guess that it wouldn't even work, since a website advertising a software would have to redirect Canadian visitors to a special download webpage with a modifier installer or simply give them that alternate installer once they click on the Download button.

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#14 NickAu

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Posted 18 January 2015 - 08:37 PM

IMO

 

This would only work if the servers are in Canada.

 

Right now there are no such laws in say Australia, so you use servers in Australian and if somebody complains, My defence would be, Tell you people to not connect to our servers in Australia, or Mr Canadian Gov't block your citizens from accessing our servers.



#15 Aura

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Posted 18 January 2015 - 10:14 PM

That's what I think too. However, what about people uses proxies and VPNs? Then it would be something else. I understand the concept of this law and why they want to apply it, it's very good. However, applying it will be kind of hard.

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