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New to pc, building a desktop?(for photo and video editing)


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#1 jcmv4792

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Posted 17 January 2015 - 10:31 PM

My budget is around $3,500 and I'd like to build a rig for gaming and editing(photos and videos). Where do I start? I've visited websites where you pick the parts and they build it for you, but with all the options for cpu's, gpu's, motherboards...etc I'm a bit lost.

 

I know I may not even need to spend that much for my purposes, but I'd like to "future proof" my purchase. 


Edited by jcmv4792, 17 January 2015 - 10:32 PM.


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#2 ssgtjeffward

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Posted 18 January 2015 - 02:10 PM

I do not know about future proofing your purchase as it seems that computer hardware is always improving. The following is all from Tiger Direct and would be my computer if I had a budget of $1300. This would also mean that I build the system myself but it gives you an idea of what's out there. I am sure others will have a different setup that they would recommend and it is all good.

 

 

 

                SMD-102812745 :: SAMSUNG 850 EVO Series 250GB Solid State Drive - Internal, 2.5", Up to 520 MB/sec Write Speed, Up to 540 MB/sec Read Speed, 3D Vertical NAND, SATA III - MZ-75E250B/AM

Price:

$199.99

- $50.00

$149.99

                OSU-102759818 :: ASUS GeForce GTX 970 STRIX Video Graphics Card - NVIDIA GPU, 4GB GDDR5, 256-bit, PCI Express 3.0 x16, DVI-I & DVI-D, HDMI, DisplayPort, HDCP Support, NVIDIA PhysX - STRIX-GTX970-DC2OC

$349.99

Update

                JHE-102569194 :: Thermaltake Toughpower 850W Gold - 80 PLUS Gold PSU, Ultra Quiet Fan, Haswell Ready - PS-TPD-0850MPCGUS-1

Price:

$169.99

- $20.00

$149.99

                LGE-102333088 :: LG Super Multi Blue 16X SATA Internal Blu-Ray Burner OEM - 12x BD Read, 16x BD-R Write, Buffer: 4MB, 3D Support - WH16NS40

List Price:

Instant Savings:

Price:

$79.99

- $15.00

$64.99

                QDA-102011022 :: ADATA XPG V1.0 8GB Desktop Memory - DDR3 1600, 2 X 4GB, Blue - AX3U1600W4G11-DD

Savings:

Price:

$89.99

- $15.00

$74.99

                A79-8351 :: AMD FD6300WMHkBOX FX-6300 Six-Core 3.5GHz AM3+ Processor - AM3+, Six-Core, 3.5GHz, 14MB, 95W, Unlocked

Price:

$139.99

- $30.00

$109.99

                C283-1223 :: Cooler Master HAF 922M ATX Mid-Tower Case - 5x5.25" Drive Bays, 5x3.5" Drive Bays, 7xExp Slots, 2xUSB 3.0 Ports, 2xAudio Ports, 2x200mm Fans, 1x120mm Fan, Black - RC-922M-KKN3-GP

Price:

$109.99

- $10.00

$99.99

                A455-9902 :: Asus Sabertooth 990FX R2.0 AM3+ Motherboard - ATX, Socket AM3+, AMD 990FX/SB950, DDR3 1866 MHz, SATA III (6Gb/s), RAID, 8-CH Audio, Gigabit LAN, USB 3.0, PCIe 2.0, CrossFireX Ready

$199.99

                TSD-2000AS4 :: Seagate Barracuda 2TB SATA Hard Drive - 7200RPM, 64MB, SATA 6Gb/s - ST2000DM001

Price:

$119.99

- $35.00

$84.99

 



#3 ihavanswer

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Posted 18 January 2015 - 09:45 PM

Here is a good resource for what you need to buy:

http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/133861/what-do-i-need-to-build-a-computer/

Also, a good video series detailing what to buy, how to assemble it, and how to set it up (2 episodes):

A good web program to lay out your build, find the lowest prices, and check for compatibility is:

http://www.pcpartpicker.com

 

The key to future-proofing is a good motherboard, hard drives, and power supply.  Everything else is easily replaceable and commonly upgraded.

Building computers is what I'm best at out of all of the technical activities that I do, so you can ask any questions you have throughout the purchasing process right here on this forum, and if I do not respond within a day, or you want to ask specifically me a question, you can Private Message me.



#4 YeahBleeping

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Posted 19 January 2015 - 02:21 PM

FYI I did not watch the videos but I wanted to say that (no offense) ssgt but suggesting an AMD based motherboard/cpu combination is not what you want to do for someone who plans on rendering or encoding video.

 

You just can't beat intel when it comes to sure performance.  Thats not to say AMD doesnt have its merits as good competition.  But for sheer processing power Intel based cpu's are much faster than AMD.

 

to the OP .. do you plan to build this system yourself?  Do you need any redundancy? (raid)? have you any idea what you plan to do for backups? Do you also need a monitor?  What OS do you prefer?



#5 jcmv4792

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Posted 20 January 2015 - 12:10 AM

FYI I did not watch the videos but I wanted to say that (no offense) ssgt but suggesting an AMD based motherboard/cpu combination is not what you want to do for someone who plans on rendering or encoding video.

 

You just can't beat intel when it comes to sure performance.  Thats not to say AMD doesnt have its merits as good competition.  But for sheer processing power Intel based cpu's are much faster than AMD.

 

to the OP .. do you plan to build this system yourself?  Do you need any redundancy? (raid)? have you any idea what you plan to do for backups? Do you also need a monitor?  What OS do you prefer?

 

I'm not sure. Is putting the parts together hard? If so, maybe I should just buy from a site that will put them together before shipping. I'll probably just keep an external hard drive to store duplicates(mostly photos).

Yes I'd prefer to buy a monitor with good color accuracy and high resolution(for photo and some video work). For this rig I'm thinking either windows 7 or 8. 



#6 ssgtjeffward

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Posted 20 January 2015 - 02:21 PM

If you are not comfortable working with electronics it might be better to have someone put the system together for you. The last system I put together came with a defective motherboard and this had to be troubleshooted. I am not saying it happens all of the time but if something is defective it can lead to some frustration. If you do decide to build the system invest in an antistatic strap.

 

As far as a monitor I would look at different monitors at a store and buy the one that looks best to you. As for an external drive I would suggest you use this for backups only and leave the drive disconnected when not backing up. There are some really bad programs out there and a good backup might save you some grief. I personally would go with windows 7 but someone may have a better reason to go with windows 8.



#7 ihavanswer

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Posted 20 January 2015 - 03:03 PM

I hate giving contrasting advice because then it is hard to make decisions, but I have to share my experience.

 

Putting the parts together is not hard at all.  My first build I had no experience, only watched the videos I sent you, and it turned out great, no problems.  You will most likely over-pay for a system built by a company or someone else.

 

With the monitors, I would not recommend going to a store, because they generally do not stock the high end monitors, and will try to sell you some over-priced, under-spec'ed monitor.  You want a monitor with a feature known as IPS.  I dont know what this means, but I know it provides truer blacks and whites, and more accurate colors.  Make sure to look for at least 1920x1080, or 2560x1440, with a minimum 60hz refresh rate.  If you can afford it, multiple monitors will help with editing and multitasking.

 

I hate the interface of Windows 8; find it much more difficult to use.  If you have used pretty much any version of windows before, you will hate 8.  My recommendation is 7.



#8 DJBPace07

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Posted 21 January 2015 - 08:53 AM

AMD's solution is good for budget-oriented builds, but with a price point of $3500, you should go Intel.  IPS monitors are a type of monitor technology.  IPS aims for color accuracy and viewing angles, but tends to be a little slower than TN monitors.  Modern IPS panels are faster so you shouldn't have problems.

 

Here's an idea, for $3500 you can get a really good PC.

 

Case:  LIAN LI PC-A76 - You can fit a great deal of hardware in this, it's huge.  $189

 

Motherboard:  ASUS X99-A LGA 2011-v3 Intel X99 - This is Intel's most advanced platform and is aimed at the enthusiast and professionals.  $254

 

CPU:  Intel Core i7-5820K Haswell-E 6-Core 3.3GHz LGA 2011-v3 - This is actually one of the least expensive LGA 2011-v3 processors.  $389

 

RAM:  Crucial 16GB (4 x 4GB) 288-Pin DDR4 SDRAM DDR4 2133 - This motherboard requires DDR4 RAM which is new and expensive.  $199

 

OS:  Windows 8.1 Pro 64-bit OEM - You need an operating system.  Windows 8 gets a lot of negative attention, but you can get past the annoying tile interface and go straight to the desktop.  Windows 10 will eventually be out and you can upgrade to that.  $139

 

SSD:  Intel 530 Series SSDSC2BW240A4K5 2.5" 240GB SATA III - You can install your operating system and some of your most frequently used applications onto this for speed.  $139

 

HDD:  WD Green WD40EZRX 4TB - This drive is for storing everything else.  $149

 

ODD:  LG Black Blu-ray Burner SATA WH16NS40 - A Blu-Ray burner.  $59

 

PSU:  Antec High Current Gamer Series HCG-900 900W - Plenty of power.  I got such a high wattage unit just in case you decide to use multiple graphics cards.  $129

 

GPU:  EVGA 04G-2981-KR GeForce GTX 980 4GB - You mentioned gaming, this is one of the best GPU's around for that.  $549

 

Monitor:  ASUS VS24AH-P VS24AH-P Black 24" - This is an IPS monitor at a good resolution.  You can double-up on these if you want.  $229

 

Heatsink and Fan:  Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO - The CPU does not come with a cooler.  $35

 

Grand Total:  $2469

 

This doesn't include a second graphics card or second monitor or peripherals.


Edited by DJBPace07, 21 January 2015 - 09:02 AM.

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#9 ihavanswer

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Posted 21 January 2015 - 11:43 AM

DJB has put together a very good computer list, the only thing I would recommend is changing from a WD Green drive to a Black drive.  It will perform better for what you are looking for.



#10 jcmv4792

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Posted 21 January 2015 - 12:01 PM

Thanks for the help guys. Will look more into this and come back once I have a decision.






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