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Windows 7 MARKED for DEATH by Microsoft as of NOW


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#1 NickAu

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Posted 13 January 2015 - 09:31 PM

 

Today, 13 January, is the day on which Microsoft's Windows 7 passes from mainstream support into extended support.

The milestone is the first on the road to Microsoft pulling the plug on January 14th, 2020.

Windows 7 is a widely-admired version of Windows, as it is more stable than its predecessor Windows Vista and did not try to foist a confusing new UI on the operating system as happened with Windows 8.

At last count, Windows 7 therefore ran on about 55 per cent of the world's PC fleet, well ahead of Windows 8 and 8.1 combined.

All versions of Windows 7 move to extended support today and expire come 2020, save the embedded version which Microsoft's page for support timing says is exempt from obsolescence.

The change from mainstream to extended support means Microsoft won't do free support for Windows 7 as of today. Even those with licences paid up, or signed up to licensing programs, will now be charged for Windows 7 support according to Microsoft's support lifecycle policy. Nor will Redmond consider or implement any new features for Windows 7.

Security patches will continue to flow until 2020.

Cast your mind ahead to that far date: by then it's likely Windows 11 – or whatever Microsoft chooses to call Windows by then – will be upon us.

Much speculation suggests that by 2020 Microsoft will have moved away from big-bang Windows releases. Yet Redmond's lifecycle policy provides gives Microsoft a carrot to dangle – free support with more recent OSes - and a stick with which to cajole users into upgrades and/or new licensing agreements.

Will Redmond be able to put down those cudgels?

You've got either a few months – assuming Windows 10 ships by year's end as planned – or five years to find out. ®

Windows 7 MARKED for DEATH by Microsoft as of NOW ...

 

Contrary to headlines you may have read today, Microsoft isn't dropping support for Windows 7 today. The operating system is still supported and will continue to receive security updates for at least another five years.

And for those that think Windows 7 will never end, Think Windows XP.

 

Don't panic yet.


Edited by hamluis, 14 January 2015 - 11:47 AM.
Moved from Win 7 to Gen Chat - Hamluis.


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#2 Kirbyofdeath

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Posted 13 January 2015 - 10:51 PM

For me, the transition from xp to 7 was somewhat confusing but I could still do it. However, the transition from 7 to 8.1 and up seems impossible for me by how windows had adopted a more confusing UI and less compatibility. 



#3 NickAu

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Posted 13 January 2015 - 11:06 PM

 

For me, the transition from xp to 7 was somewhat confusing but I could still do it.

I have heard this so many times and with all due respect I don't get it.

I used Xp before Linux, and I still do not see the difference between XP and Windows 7 I have no problems navagating and finding anything on 7, Ok I admit there are some differences, It looks better, It needs a better PC to run it and a few things under the hood that most users will never know about, Other than that I just can't see it, My documents is in the same place, Actually everything is still in the same place, You install software the same way, You uninstall it the same way, See where i am going with this? If you dont like the look of 7 you can turn off the eye candy and it will look like Windows2000. I do not understand or see these differences, The way people talk about these differences you would think it's like going from Windows to Linux.


Edited by NickAu, 13 January 2015 - 11:07 PM.


#4 Ezzah

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Posted 13 January 2015 - 11:14 PM

XP to 8.1 would be the biggest jump, but it's still not monumental enough to be completely mindboggled. A lot of things are still shared across these OS's. 

 

I'll still stick with W7 until W10, and then we'll see :)


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#5 Scoop8

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Posted 14 January 2015 - 08:59 AM

I had the same experience as NickAu when I switched to Win 7 from XP in 2010.  I'd been running XP since 2004 and needed to get a new PC in 2010 due to old hardware/slow CPU, etc.

 

I recall being apprehensive when I had my PC built at a local store when asked "What OS do you want installed with the new PC?  XP or 7?"

 

I almost stayed with XP but glad I went with 7.  It was the easiest OS transition I've experienced with my home PC's.

 

For my daily PC uses, 7 does the job well.  I'm running on my original 7 install's with both my PC's at home.



#6 Kirbyofdeath

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Posted 14 January 2015 - 10:40 AM

oops I meant vista. From xp to vista my main problem was the new User Account Control. Sure it blocks malware, but activating even when you want to change a computer setting made me hate UAC. I only used Vista sparingly until I got a computer with Windows 7. When I DID try Windows 7, it had become my new favorite OS, but 2 gigs of ram soon became small from all the programs I run, and I eventually installed Windows XP, alongside Linux Mint and FreeDOS.



#7 Sintharius

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Posted 14 January 2015 - 10:50 AM

Well... when it comes to that I'll switch to 8, then 10.

What I don't like about 8.1 right now is some security tools we use don't support Windows 8.1.

#8 the_patriot11

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Posted 15 January 2015 - 04:40 PM

XP is still not dead, I still run it lol.


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#9 rp88

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Posted 15 January 2015 - 04:57 PM

"XP to 8.1 would be the biggest jump"
Not so sure about that. XP to 8.0 (which is what i did) would be a bigger jump as 8.0 lacks a start menu entirely and 8.1 reintroduces it. Anothert thing to consider here is that how big a jump it will feel depends on how tehcnical a user is and how they use the older OS they are coming from. For example If someone moves from xp to 8 and is not comfortable with either the "window key" +"R" command or with browsing deep through C:\Program Files\ or C:\Windows\ thye might struggle to find certain programs, where if they know these methods and understand things like setting particular file types to open with particular programs(so they can avoid pdf files and pictures opening in the metro monstrosity) they might do better. But then I also think if someone had got REALLY skilled with an old OS they might take the transition as a bit of a shock due to settings that most users would have never even heard of which had changed between the old and new OS.


"If you dont like the look of 7 you can turn off the eye candy"
Just to comment on this point, turning off "eye-candy" is often a pretty wise move. It makes a measurable increase in system speed. As computers get more powerful (following moore's law)programs running on them get more processor/memory hungry with subsequent versions, if old software was run on modern hardware it would be extraordinarily fast. Turning off fancy visual effects in the places they are not needed gives benefits for the same reason that old software on modern machines will be quick.

Edited by rp88, 15 January 2015 - 04:57 PM.

Back on this site, for a while anyway, been so busy the last year.

My systems:2 laptops, intel i3 processors, windows 8.1 installed on the hard-drive and linux mint 17.3 MATE installed to USB

#10 PuReinSAniTY

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Posted 19 January 2015 - 03:33 AM

XP is still not dead, I still run it lol.


You'll be wanting to change when you're antivirus doesn't support xp anymore and you get a polymorphic file infector......lol

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#11 M. de Jager

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Posted 19 January 2015 - 04:38 AM

Windows 7 is still great - *looks on ISO folder, find some WIndows 7 ISOs :smash: * - and works beter then 8 and 8.1; but I use Windows 8.1, seems legit?

 

I'm sure that when Windows 7 is official dead in 2020 you will have a awesome operation called Windows 10 :D   :guitar:



#12 Platypus

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Posted 19 January 2015 - 05:20 AM

End of support for Windows 8.x is also known - 01/10/2023

 

http://support2.microsoft.com/lifecycle/default.aspx?LN=en-au&p1=17655&x=13&y=14

 

You can entertain yourself finding out when lots of product's support comes to an end:

 

http://support.microsoft.com/gp/lifeselectwin


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#13 cat1092

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Posted 19 January 2015 - 06:10 AM

That's as long as Windows 8 is upgraded to 8.1, otherwise MS is pulling the plug on Windows 8 come 01/12/2016. 

 

8.1 is considered as an SP to 8, even though it didn't install as such. 

 

http://support2.microsoft.com/lifecycle/search/default.aspx?alpha=Windows+8

 

Kind of like how Windows 7 that hasn't been upgraded to SP1 or Vista not upgraded to SP2 gets no more support. For Windows 7 users who didn't accept SP1, that date was 04/09/2013.

 

http://support2.microsoft.com/lifecycle/search/default.aspx?alpha=windows+7

 

Speaking of which, seems like it's long overdue SP2 for Windows 7, last time I installed one, there were 202 updates & that was with SP1 install media. Had it been a 2009/10 computer with Windows 7 w/out SP1 from the recovery partition, would have been a lot more. 

 

Today, installing XP is a walk in the park comparing to a Windows 7 one. 

 

Speaking of which, I was another one who went straight from XP to Windows 7, the only learning curve was how to operate my new PC. Windows 7 was like XP on steroids. I imagine that if 7 remains popular, and especially if 10 isn't a hit, it's life will be extended just like XP's was. At any rate, it should be, because today, consumers are purchasing Windows 7 computers like mad. Newegg still carries the OS for self install. 

 

It will be a lot harder getting consumers off of Windows 7 than XP, probably because to date, it's the best OS MS ever released & when they were at the top of their game. Today, lots of uncertainty, consumers wants stability & Windows 7 provides that. Given that the OS has carried MS through some tough times, it's more than deserving of a 3 year extension. 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#14 JohnnyJammer

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Posted 19 January 2015 - 06:02 PM

I find Win7 to be one of the best systems to date. I cant think of a BSOD that hasnt been 3rd party driver related, remember the old days of a simple print driver creating havoc on xp and early days of Vista?.

Its great for GPO's, i think Windows XP is still usable if you use the registry hack and dont apply POS updates, dont use flash and or java or adobe reader (I still use XP to play Galaga in DOS mode).

 

Still lots of defense/army pc's are still using WinXP, if the Linux community could perfect the office suite then i would be moving all our nodes to Linux.

This would have to be about the only thing holding us back, formatting is a massive issue with the office suites i have tried.

 

if anyone has been auidted by misrosoft then they would know its like having a rectal exam and watching a horror movie at the same time!

Actually dealing with microsoft on general is like the above.



#15 cat1092

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Posted 19 January 2015 - 11:49 PM

 

 

if anyone has been auidted by misrosoft then they would know its like having a rectal exam and watching a horror movie at the same time!

Have never been audited by Microsoft, but have been by my former employer who ran the software over their BYOD policies, but have known of those who has. The corporation I worked for faced an MS audit, as well as a few Federal ones, which is far more intimidating than that of the former. 

 

 

 

Actually dealing with microsoft on general is like the above.

 

I agree, and if it weren't for my forum participation, would have little use for Windows or MS Office, am not bound by chains other than the desire to assist others. Unfortunately, come the next release, if it's free for Windows 8.1 users, and only if it's a Pro for a Pro version, no Home garbage (watered down OS's) for me, I'll accept, but if there's a charge, no matter how deep the discount, forget it. I've drawn my line in the sand & will hold good to my word. 8.1 would then be the end of the line for me & Microsoft, that would be 2023, for most purposes, it'll end with the non-supporting of Windows 7, as I have three Windows 8 installs that are booted only on Patch Tuesday and will usually not bother until the next. 

 

On the other hand, my single XP install is booted into 3-5 times per week, actually up a bit from previous months. Kind of sad really, that Microsoft refused to allow 8.1 upgraders to do so cleanly, or if a service pack (what in support terms for Windows 8 users, it is) were delivered the traditional way, than a lot of pain could have been spared MS's customers. Having to perform an upgrade install rather than MS engineers doing their jobs doesn't give consumers confidence in their "new world" OS's. Is this MS's version of the NWO (New World Order)? 

 

Am getting by with Linux Mint 17.1 MATE edition just fine, and am typing this post via the OS. Can perform a full install of the OS, including updating, installing software & much of my tweaking, in less than 2 hours, versus a weekend affair with a Windows OS. 

 

I agree with the OP that Windows 7 is marked for death, however it's not because of lack of desire from customers. Windows 7 computers are enjoying great sales, better than that of Windows 8.1, certain configurations sells out as soon as the shelves are stocked. Even the mainstream ones are moving good. It's Microsoft that has marked the OS for death, and the 1st sign is obvious, they won't deliver SP2, which provides native USB 3.0 support, but will provide that driver to partner OEM's. Shame on them for not supporting their bread & butter OS, which has carried the load through over 2 years of turmoil for customers, MS employees (many now former) & MS shareholders as they watched the purely insane amounts of cash being poured into a hole with no bottom, that being the Windows 8 family of OS's. 

 

When all they had to do was just keep supporting Windows 7 & Office 2010, letting the milk & honey (cash) continue to flow in. 

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 19 January 2015 - 11:59 PM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 





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