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man, I miss my BATchfiles in DOS 3.3 - 6.22 :)


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#31 GoofProg

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Posted 15 June 2017 - 11:22 AM

Yes, MSDOS was formed from C/PM on the PDP (and VAX I think)



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#32 RolandJS

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Posted 18 June 2017 - 06:02 AM

GoofProg, you are certainly no "goof" in any sense of the word at all!  I learn from you all the time!


"Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee."  -- Ben Franklin revisited.

http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forums/45/Computer-Technologies/

Backup, backup, backup! -- Lady Fitzgerald (w7forums)

Clone or Image often! Backup... -- RockE (WSL)


#33 britechguy

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Posted 18 June 2017 - 09:57 AM

GoofProg,

 

         You are conflating Digital Research and Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC).

 

         The full wikipedia article on MS-DOS, which is quite thorough, is worth a read.

 

         I spent years working on DEC equipment from the PDP and VAX lines.  I also worked, briefly, on the DEC Rainbow line of PCs, when they were trying to break in to that market, which didn't turn out well.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

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#34 cat1092

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Posted 22 July 2017 - 06:22 AM

While I don't know of the type of batch files of these very early versions of Windows, as described by the OP, these are still currently created & used for many purposes. :)

 

One huge example was the one that removed all updates that could force Windows 10 on users, as well as 'phoning home' Telemetry updates from both Windows 7 & 8.1. While I don't know how to create a batch file from scratch, can copy/paste one to Notepad to use as needed, have one on most all of my Windows installs called 'clean.bat' or similar one that cleans up certain items, more if ran as Administrator. It can also be placed in the Startup folder to be ran shortly after the computer boots & user is logged in, usually within 5 seconds. 

 

Here's the one that removes all Telemetry updates & those that blocked Windows 10 in 2015. It's then up to the user to hide these updates once shown again, by choosing check for updates, but not auto download or install these. Bat file download that shows as 'windows_remove_spyware' beneath, along with other instructions post removal of the below updates. I performed all other recommended tasks except the ones having to do with the router on my W7 & 8.1 installs. One must carefully review instructions on purging the leftovers afterwards to help ensure that any spyware is gone forever (still relevant for privacy, even though W10 no longer auto downloads). Have performed so many times, that I can now do a computer in less than 5 minutes. 

 

Spoiler

 

here is a .bat

 

Source link:

 

http://techne.alaya.net/?p=12499

 

Yet still, it all begins with a script & there'll always be a use for batch files, many decades later. I have a stash of batch files from Windows 2000 thorough Vista, a couple for W7, the above for W7 & 8.1 combined, as well as a 'CleanFast.bat' file on my W10 desktop that reaches places which apps like CCleaner doesn't. :)

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#35 RolandJS

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Posted 23 July 2017 - 09:25 PM

I no longer recommend end-users run my put-together-from-The-'Net batchfile silently removing a bunch of Windows Updates at will. I now recommend end-users have made sure they have restorable OS partition backups and restorable data partition backups before running such batchfiles, whether "mine" or others.  My experience has been less than ideal following such run(s), once or twice I simply restored my OS partition, and un-installed, one by one by one, any undesired Windows Updates using Windows own WU un-installer.


"Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee."  -- Ben Franklin revisited.

http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forums/45/Computer-Technologies/

Backup, backup, backup! -- Lady Fitzgerald (w7forums)

Clone or Image often! Backup... -- RockE (WSL)





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