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CPU: Bent Pines and Black Screen :(


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#1 sharly55

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Posted 13 January 2015 - 01:54 PM

Yesterday I have an accident with my CPU and their pins get bent so when I get fix it and I put it into the socket and turn on the PC, I only got a black screen in the monitor.

 

but this isn't normal because when the monitor don't detect pc said "No signal" but this time not even say that

 

My question is about if this meaning that my CPU it totally dead or I can fix this somehow... :(


Edited by sharly55, 13 January 2015 - 01:55 PM.


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#2 mauguilar

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Posted 13 January 2015 - 02:11 PM

Most likely is dead, try reseating another good CPU.



#3 ihavanswer

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Posted 13 January 2015 - 03:00 PM

I second that ^...its probably dead.  You could try looking up on youtube how to fix bent pins, but chances are, its over.



#4 dc3

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Posted 13 January 2015 - 03:51 PM

Examine the pins with a magnifying lens and make sure that all of the pins are still there and none are broken off.

 

You can use a small pair of needlenose pliers to straighten any bent pins.  But if you break one... it's toast.

 

Once you have the pins as straight as you can get them see if they match up with the sockets.  Remember that one of the corners will either be truncated or will have a symbol to differentiate it as the matching corner of the CPU.  This is done so the proper orientation of the socket and CPU can be recognized.

 

If the pins line up, and you are able to insert the CPU in the socket you will then need to clean the surface CPU's heat spreader and the mating surface of the heat sink you will need to apply new thermal compound.

 

Be sure that the CPU 12V plug is attached to the motherboard.


Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#5 sharly55

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Posted 13 January 2015 - 04:11 PM

Thanks for the help everyone  :)

 

 

 

Examine the pins with a magnifying lens and make sure that all of the pins are still there and none are broken off.

 

You can use a small pair of needlenose pliers to straighten any bent pins.  But if you break one... it's toast.

 

Once you have the pins as straight as you can get them see if they match up with the sockets.  Remember that one of the corners will either be truncated or will have a symbol to differentiate it as the matching corner of the CPU.  This is done so the proper orientation of the socket and CPU can be recognized.

 

If the pins line up, and you are able to insert the CPU in the socket you will then need to clean the surface CPU's heat spreader and the mating surface of the heat sink you will need to apply new thermal compound.

 

Be sure that the CPU 12V plug is attached to the motherboard.

 

I checked the pins and just one is broken off... I suppose I have to get a new one  :(


Edited by sharly55, 13 January 2015 - 04:13 PM.


#6 dc3

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Posted 13 January 2015 - 04:15 PM

Yep... it's toast.


Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#7 mjd420nova

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Posted 13 January 2015 - 06:34 PM

Some very delicate soldering may render it back to life if you have the broken off piece.  Most likely still in the socket.  OUCH.  That would be the killer but again some skilled work could replace the socket on the MOBO.



#8 YeahBleeping

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Posted 13 January 2015 - 07:02 PM

Just to add to this ...if that broken pin is indeed stuck in the motherboard socket be sure to get it out of there.  You can try simply turning the motherboard over and giving it a good shake.  Just make sure its not still in there when you put the new one in.



#9 dc3

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Posted 14 January 2015 - 11:17 AM

While waiting for my permanent job to open at a major laser manufacturer I worked in the Printed Circuit Department for two months.  Because I had an extensive background in soldering I wound up soldering micro board components, such as the diode in the picture below.  This takes a steady hand, an optical aide, and a micro soldering iron.  As difficult as this was, soldering a broken CPU pin back on makes the work I did easy by comparison.  If the pin that is broken is not one of the outside pins you would not be able to solder the pin without spending big bucks on a specialized iron.  Even then I would wish you luck. :P

 

microdiode_zpsbaae3ca6.png


Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#10 mjd420nova

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Posted 14 January 2015 - 12:05 PM

I spent more than a few years behind the 12 inch magnifier and those tiny 28 legged bugs are a bit easier to handle.  I have replaced  a few CPU sockets that had jammed pins in them that resisted removal.  The usual point is to upgrade the socket to a zero-G type that can't get jammed.  I had resoldered a pin on an Intel P3 CPU and it still works today after ten years.  The builder bent the pin and couldn't figure it out, so it landed in my lap.  The toughest fixes has been the inverter boards for laptop charging circuits and the adapter sockets/connectors.



#11 YeahBleeping

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Posted 14 January 2015 - 06:17 PM

MJD- Thats some good work .. you guys should go be doctors !! LOL However I'd never suggest that a Layman go out and try and solder a pin back onto a CPU.  As you stated you need the right tools for that kinda job and lets face it... anyone posting like the OP here probably does not have those kind of tools and is better off replacing the CPU- removing the damaged pin old school.

 

my 2 cents.



#12 sharly55

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Posted 26 January 2015 - 08:31 PM

While waiting for my permanent job to open at a major laser manufacturer I worked in the Printed Circuit Department for two months.  Because I had an extensive background in soldering I wound up soldering micro board components, such as the diode in the picture below.  This takes a steady hand, an optical aide, and a micro soldering iron.  As difficult as this was, soldering a broken CPU pin back on makes the work I did easy by comparison.  If the pin that is broken is not one of the outside pins you would not be able to solder the pin without spending big bucks on a specialized iron.  Even then I would wish you luck. :P

 

microdiode_zpsbaae3ca6.png

 

Thank you :) , although by the end I bought another CPU, and I want to learn how to do micro soldering, it will be really useful if I have another mistake with pins and... diodes, I suppose ;)

 

 

 

 

MJD- Thats some good work .. you guys should go be doctors !! LOL However I'd never suggest that a Layman go out and try and solder a pin back onto a CPU.  As you stated you need the right tools for that kinda job and lets face it... anyone posting like the OP here probably does not have those kind of tools and is better off replacing the CPU- removing the damaged pin old school.

 

my 2 cents.

 

Indeed, I don't have either the tools or knowledge... Ignorance is expensive sometimes :(



#13 mjd420nova

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Posted 27 January 2015 - 01:16 PM

The present day micro-soldering is all done by machines.  The devices are stuck to the board with a tiny bit of adhesive and then placed in a chamber much like the way the chips are made and the solder is ionized into the air to get solder on just those tiny points.  Real repairs need at least a 6X magnifier and plenty of light.  Sometimes even a 10X is needed to confirm clean connections after repairs.  The assembly machines even have built in optical inspection points to confirm in a flash correct placement and connection,  later QC will test the whole board.


Edited by mjd420nova, 27 January 2015 - 01:17 PM.





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