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Computer won't work after replacing processor


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#1 Green_Razor

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Posted 12 January 2015 - 09:11 PM

I recently got an intel processor and opened up my computer to install it. After I took out the old one, I realized that the intel processor won't fit into the slot, so I put the old one back. Now it will start but the monitor gets no input. I have tried using a different monitor, checking the pins on the processor, and taking out my video card and using the one built into the motherboard. The computer will turn on and all the fans will start turning, but the monitor gets no input.



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#2 YeahBleeping

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Posted 12 January 2015 - 09:54 PM

Hi there.. If we start simple check to make sure that your video card is seated properly and that you didnt nock it out of wack when you replaced the CPU.. If you don't have a video card and the video connection is connected to the motherboard check the cable connections are properly seated.  And that all cables are snug.

 

Next would be take the CPU back out and makeing sure that upon replacing the cpu .. you didn accidently bend pins.



#3 Green_Razor

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Posted 14 January 2015 - 10:47 PM

Hi there.. If we start simple check to make sure that your video card is seated properly and that you didnt nock it out of wack when you replaced the CPU.. If you don't have a video card and the video connection is connected to the motherboard check the cable connections are properly seated.  And that all cables are snug.

 

Next would be take the CPU back out and makeing sure that upon replacing the cpu .. you didn accidently bend pins.

I have taken out the video card and plugged the monitor into the motherboard, made sure the cords aren't loose, made sure it isn't the monitor, and taken out and put back in the cpu to make sure the pins aren't bent. My cpu doesn't have long pins so it would be hard to bend one anyway but I checked just incase.



#4 cat1092

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Posted 15 January 2015 - 02:45 AM

Did you ground yourself before and during working on the computer? 

 

This can involve purchasing an inexpensive wrist strap designed for this purpose, or being sure to touch a part of the metal case prior to performing maintenance. Plus being sure not to perform these operations on carpet, this is an absolute no-no, regardless if one has seen others do it w/out harm. 

 

Also, it's imperative not to come in contact with the pins of the CPU with your body, static or oil from skin can damage it. Though this is rare, it happens. Usually damage to the CPU is a result of bent pins, and these doesn't have to be long for this to happen. At any rate, if there aren't bent pins, the CPU will drop into the socket with practically no effort. I take it that you did replace the thermal paste also? Clean off all of the old on both the CPU & heatsink surfaces. If the paste wasn't replaced, it's instant failure as soon as the computer is booted. 

 

During the winter months, static risk is higher, making it all the more important to ensure you've grounded yourself as a precaution, though it should be done year round. 

 

Finally, have you checked to make sure that all wires & cables are in place & snug? Sometimes older (or frayed) cables will break internally during disconnection, as a result of being hard to remove. If you have an extra cable to connect the PC to monitor, switch the cables. 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 





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