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Best Antivirus to prevent infection?


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#1 timb120

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Posted 09 January 2015 - 10:44 PM

Hi, I'm looking for a new anti-virus program.  I'm currently using 360 Total Security but I feel that it's not as paranoid and suspicious as I am and it has a bunch of extra stuff that I feel isn't worth the system resources.  I would like to find an anti virus program that would even question cute, innocent puppy pictures and is very good at picking out viruses and dealing with them accordingly.

 

I don't need a lot of fancy additional features.  I have CCleaner and Malwarebytes for the extra work.  I'm thinking about Bitdefender free edition but I would appreciate any other suggestions.  Thanks.



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#2 TsVk!

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Posted 09 January 2015 - 10:46 PM

I use BitDefender free for home machines. It's great. I think the best free alternative right now... Avast is still up there too, worth reading about.



#3 Animal

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Posted 09 January 2015 - 11:12 PM

See here: http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/407147/answers-to-common-security-questions-best-practices/?p=2316629

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#4 quietman7

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Posted 10 January 2015 - 08:03 AM

Are you using Malwarebytes Free or Premium?...it makes a difference as far as protection goes.

CCleaner is a freeware system privacy and cleaning tool that removes unused, temporary and junk files from your system to include temporary Internet files, cookies, erases private data in browser history, etc. Use of the cleaning feature is recommended to delete such files in order to improve performance and reclaim space. The only thing it adds for security is to help speed up scans performed by security tools after cleaning out the junk so there are less files to scan.
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#5 rp88

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Posted 10 January 2015 - 11:54 AM

AS WELL AS your antivirus you might wish to consider taking actions to make your browser better protected. You should first uninstall Java( or if you need it for a desktop program then disable it's online functions from within control panel), then download firefox, set all the plugins you might use (flash player mainly) to "ask to activate" and set all those you don't use to "never activate". Then install the firefox extensions Noscript and Adblockplus.

https://noscript.net/

https://adblockplus.org/

So many attacks thesedays work by "drive-by" methods and often happen in flash adverts embedded on legitimate websites. Taking these actions will make such attack types far less likely to work against you.


As for "cute innocent looking puppy pictures", make sure that "display full file extensions even on known file types" is turned on in windows "folder options". This way you can see instanly if those cute pictures are really jpg or png files (image formats, there are a few cases of infected images existing but they are very rare so jpg and png files can usually be considered utterly safe) or sneakily renamed exe or scr files (which can contain viruses, and when someone has gone to the bother of renaming the extension probably are).

Edited by rp88, 10 January 2015 - 11:54 AM.

Back on this site, for a while anyway, been so busy the last year.

My systems:2 laptops, intel i3 processors, windows 8.1 installed on the hard-drive and linux mint 17.3 MATE installed to USB

#6 quietman7

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Posted 10 January 2015 - 06:55 PM

... then download firefox..,

I thought we covered this once before...there is no need to download and use Firefox if the user is satisfied with the current browser they are using...unless of course it is an XP user with Internet Explorer 8.
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#7 timb120

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Posted 10 January 2015 - 09:36 PM

I guess my "cute puppy picture" analogy fell flat.  I meant I would like an anti virus program that is more stringent in its anti-virus detection and protection.

 

360 Total Security has a lot of additional features.  Some of them are the same features offered by CCleaner so I see no point in keeping 360 Total Security especially considering the amount of computer resources it uses.

 

So basically, I just want a light, simple, overly zealous anti virus program.  Bitdefender seems to fit the description but I would like other's opinions.

 

Last time I checked Adblockerplus, ironically, installs a bunch of adware and unwanted stuff with installation.  Even if it's optional during setup it's enough for me to question Adblockerplus.

 

I'm using IE10 right now and I'm happy with it.  I like the simple, non cluttered interface of IE.


Edited by timb120, 10 January 2015 - 09:38 PM.


#8 quietman7

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Posted 10 January 2015 - 09:44 PM

So basically, I just want a light, simple, overly zealous anti virus program.

I generally recommend ESET NOD32 Anti-Virus if choosing a paid for program as it leaves a small footprint...meaning it is not intrusive and does not utilize a lot of system resources. Emsisoft Anti-Malware is also a good choice if looking for a paid for program and so is Kaspersky Anti-virus. If you don't want to pay then I would recommend avast! Free Antivirus or Bitdefender Anti-virus Free Edition.

ESET and Emsisoft Anti-Malware have the added advantage of blocking the installation of most Potentially Unwanted Programs (PUPs) (such as adware, spyware, unwanted toolbars, browser hijackers).
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#9 Aura

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Posted 12 January 2015 - 12:38 PM

I guess my "cute puppy picture" analogy fell flat.  I meant I would like an anti virus program that is more stringent in its anti-virus detection and protection.
 
360 Total Security has a lot of additional features.  Some of them are the same features offered by CCleaner so I see no point in keeping 360 Total Security especially considering the amount of computer resources it uses.
 
So basically, I just want a light, simple, overly zealous anti virus program.  Bitdefender seems to fit the description but I would like other's opinions.
 
Last time I checked Adblockerplus, ironically, installs a bunch of adware and unwanted stuff with installation.  Even if it's optional during setup it's enough for me to question Adblockerplus.
 
I'm using IE10 right now and I'm happy with it.  I like the simple, non cluttered interface of IE.


I'll be honest with you, 360 Total Security isn't worth using, you would be satisfied with 360 Internet Security. The reason is that Total Security offers "PC Boost" features, and these features are mostly bloated, or not needed. Yes, it's a good thing to "manage" your system so it performs better, but every features offered by 360 TS, or other programs like Advanced System Care (piece of ... anyway) CAN be done natively using in-built Windows tools or simple tools (standalones) from the Sysinternals Suite. People don't realize that installing programs with such features just bloat their system down and put them at risk of messing up royally their computer if they over-abuse them or incorrectly use them. You don't need any PC Booster/Boosting features to keep your system up and running. In fact, you can't push your system's performance over the one provided by your current hardware (except if you overclock certain components like the CPU, RAM, etc.). The only thing you can do is to properly manage your Windows system using the in-built tools and everything will run clean and smooth. Many Antivirus products offers these kind of features in their "total" package, hence why I don't really recommend them, as I see them as not being needed. Sorry for the small rant.

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#10 quietman7

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Posted 12 January 2015 - 02:49 PM

I'm not an advocate of suites. All-in-one tools and suites are filled with extra features (including "bells & whistles") which typically use more system resources than separate programs that do the same task. They tend to have varying degrees of strengths and weaknesses for each feature. In contrast, separate tools are designed, built and maintained with a greater focus in a specific area so they are generally of better quality and more effective at what they are designed to do. This means the program's performance for that particular feature is usually superior than their all-in-one counterpart. Further, all-in-one tools generally do not allow the user as much flexibility in tailoring default settings and usage.
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#11 Aura

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Posted 12 January 2015 - 03:12 PM

I'm not an advocate of suites. All-in-one tools and suites are filled with extra features (including "bells & whistles") which typically use more system resources than separate programs that do the same task. They tend to have varying degrees of strengths and weaknesses for each feature. In contrast, separate tools are designed, built and maintained with a greater focus in a specific area so they are generally of better quality and more effective at what they are designed to do. This means the program's performance for that particular feature is usually superior than their all-in-one counterpart. Further, all-in-one tools generally do not allow the user as much flexibility in tailoring default settings and usage.


Personally I don't have a problem with "suites", as long as they are Internet Suites. These will often offer more than a basic Antivirus protection, adding Internet related features such as a Firewall, which is always good to have (as it will most likely be more efficient than the default Windows Firewall in Vista and later versions). So as long as all the features included are directly related to the security of the system, a "protection layer" like I call it, I don't have any problems with it. It's when they start adding features like secured web browsing, Cloud storage, etc. that I find it useless. For secured web browser, Comodo have two good ones for free, or you can beef up yours easily with extensions and add-ons. For Cloud storage, there's companies specialized in that like DropBox, Box, Google Drive, Microsoft OneDrive, etc. You don't need these features included in your Antivirus product, features that you have to pay for. Secured vault on your system? TeraCrypt, VeraCrypt, TrueCrypt 7.1a, etc. can all do that as well, free of charge. I think Antivirus companies should keep the focus on what they do best : creating security software for the user, and leave the rest, the "bloated" features to companies that actually specializes in these domains.

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#12 quietman7

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Posted 12 January 2015 - 03:53 PM

Windows built-in Firewall has always been sufficient for my machines.
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#13 Aura

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Posted 12 January 2015 - 03:56 PM

I like it, as I know how to use it, but there's many people that prefers the user-friendless of Antivirus products Firewall I guess since the options to allow rules, programs, etc. are more highlighted than in the Windows Firewall. Plus some of then will come with more features like IPS or IDS (but you see them more on stand alone firewalls like Comodo Firewall). I guess it depends of the level of security you want.

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#14 quietman7

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Posted 12 January 2015 - 04:37 PM

Windows Firewall Tools which can be used to extend the default Windows firewall behavior and used for quick access to define rules and configure the most frequently used options.Further, there is this...

Why do the Suites not include Avira FireWall anymore?

Since it was launched the Windows Firewall has been technically continuously improved and optimized. Today the Windows Firewall offers such good protection, Avira thinks there is no need to develop and maintain its own firewall solution. Therefore the Avira FireWall has been removed from the portfolio.

Avira Products FAQs

Previously this was written in that same FAQ and replaced with the above...

The Avira FireWall is using some technologies that Microsoft deprecated with the introduction of Windows 8. In order to receive the Windows 8 certification, it was needed to remove and replace them from the package. Avira FireWall is replaced by the new management layer of Windows Firewall starting with Windows Vista...The new Windows Firewall control feature replaces the legacy Avira FireWall, so all products continue to have firewall protection...

However, I found that statement still noted here.
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#15 posttoastie

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Posted 12 January 2015 - 07:28 PM

I guess my "cute puppy picture" analogy fell flat.  I meant I would like an anti virus program that is more stringent in its anti-virus detection and protection.

 

360 Total Security has a lot of additional features.  Some of them are the same features offered by CCleaner so I see no point in keeping 360 Total Security especially considering the amount of computer resources it uses.

 

So basically, I just want a light, simple, overly zealous anti virus program.  Bitdefender seems to fit the description but I would like other's opinions.

 

Last time I checked Adblockerplus, ironically, installs a bunch of adware and unwanted stuff with installation.  Even if it's optional during setup it's enough for me to question Adblockerplus.

 

I'm using IE10 right now and I'm happy with it.  I like the simple, non cluttered interface of IE.

I understand from other forums BitDefender has really, really, really poor customer support, which means a lot to me.






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