Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Replacing MB and vga, should I uninstall any software first


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 markcomp

markcomp

  • Members
  • 9 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:11:15 PM

Posted 09 January 2015 - 04:41 AM

I am replacing a MB with onboard graphics with new MB and vga card. I will uninstall the graphics drivers, but should I uninstall anything to do with the old board (both MB's are ASUS)?

Anything else I should be aware of?

Thanks for any feedback

Mark



BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 bobthewonderdog

bobthewonderdog

  • Members
  • 1 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:10:15 PM

Posted 09 January 2015 - 06:06 AM

When changing hardware such as motherboards I would always recommend a fresh install, it will give you the most stable system in the long run.

 

Remember to back up everything, and make sure you have all the installers and keys for your software. nirsoft has some great utilities to grab your current windows and office keys (easier than finding them in the box of junk we all have).

 

On windows 7 - If you really can't do a fresh install I would take a look at the sysprep command. You can do a quick and dirty sysprep where you basically sysprep -generalize then shutdown change the hardware then start it up. the windows install will freak out, and not boot. Then restart in safe mode (Hammer F8 whilst starting up) and it should start redetecting hardware. Then reboot and you are good to go. I have used this successfully a few times when in a pinch, but do so at your own risk. You will need to reinstall all the drivers again but your software should all work.

 

On windows 8 I havent had to do this so I cannot verify success

 

In the end as long as you have a full system image backup or an Acronis or other clone you can do what you want and restore if it all goes wrong.

 

Oh and in case I didn't make it obvious enough - BACKUP EVERYTHING

 

EDIT: when changing hardware configuration it is likely you will have to reactivate windows too!


Edited by bobthewonderdog, 09 January 2015 - 06:08 AM.


#3 DJBPace07

DJBPace07

  • BC Advisor
  • 4,869 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:06:15 PM

Posted 09 January 2015 - 08:24 AM

Be careful with Windows.  If you are using a System Builder/OEM copy, those are tied to the motherboard so if you swap it out, you need a new license.  If you have a full, boxed retail copy, those are allowed to be moved from one motherboard to another per the license.


3939.png

 


#4 WinOutreach2

WinOutreach2

    Authorized Microsoft Rep


  • Members
  • 6 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:06:15 PM

Posted 16 January 2015 - 10:45 AM

DJBPace07, you may want to take a close look at the Windows System Builder License.

 

It is always recommended to do a fresh installation when moving between hardware to ensure that no elements of the previous configuration conflict with the new hardware. Sysprep /Generalize prepares a system for a disparate environment, but it has limitations. For example, a driver might be comprised of two components, the driver file and a control panel application. Sysprep may only remove the driver, but the control panel application (and its associated registry configuration, files, scheduled tasks, and instructions to launch at startup) remain.

 

This is why when preparing an image for deployment in an organization it is a best practice to create that image in a virtual machine. This provides the most hardware-independent environment possible for that image. It is also best practice to avoid installing applications or drivers in the image, allowing the deployment technologies like the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit to manage those components at the time of deployment.

 

Brandon
Windows Outreach Team- IT Pro
Windows for IT Pros on TechNet



#5 markcomp

markcomp
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 9 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:11:15 PM

Posted 16 January 2015 - 11:52 AM

Thanks everyone who has commented, I am going to take the advice and go for a clean install by formating the hard drive first. Although I am going to check out the virtual machine comment as this is new to me.

Thanks

Mark






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users