Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Murphy's Laws relative to hardware.


  • Please log in to reply
No replies to this topic

#1 NickAu

NickAu

    Bleepin' Fish Doctor


  • Moderator
  • 13,827 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:127.0.0.1 Australia
  • Local time:10:42 PM

Posted 08 January 2015 - 03:49 AM

Here are a few examples of Murphy's Laws relative to hardware.

  • Law of Inconvenient Malfunction: A device will fail at the least opportune possible moment.
  • Law of Cable Compatibility: If you choose a cable and a connector at random, the probability that they are compatible is equal to zero.
  • Law of Hardware Compatibility: The probability of a given peripheral being compatible with a PC is inversely proportional to the immediate need for that peripheral.
  • Law of Bad Sectors: The probability that an untested diskette will have bad sectors is directly proportional to the importance of the data written onto the diskette.
  • First Law of Selective Gravitation: When an object is dropped, it will fall in such a way as to cause the greatest possible damage to itself and/or other objects on which it lands.
  • Second Law of Selective Gravitation: The tendency for an object to be dropped is directly proportional to its value.
  • Law of Reality Change: Unalterable hardware specifications will change as necessary to maximize frustration for personnel affected by said specifications.
  • Law of Noise: Noise bursts occur so as to cause the most, and/or most serious, errors in data communications, regardless of the actual amount of noise present.
  • Law of Expectation: Consumer expectations always outpace advances in hardware technology.
  • Law of the Titanic: If a device cannot malfunction, it will.

Here are a few greatly simplified examples of Murphy's Laws as they relate to programming.

  • Law of Debugging: The difficulty of debugging software is directly proportional to the number of people who will ultimately use it.
  • Law of Neurosis: The chances of software being neurotic (developing bugs spontaneously without apparent reason) is directly proportional to the confusion such neurosis can cause.
  • Law of Available Space: If there are n bytes in a crucial software program, the available space for its convenient storage or loading is equal to n-1 bytes.
  • First Law of Bad Sectors: The probability of software being mutilated by bad sectors is directly proportional to the value and/or importance of the programs.
  • Second Law of Bad Sectors: When a program is mutilated by bad sectors, the damage will occur at the point(s) that result in the most frequent and/or severe errors when the program is run.
  • Law of Noise: When a downloaded program is corrupted by noise, the corruption will occur at the point(s) that result in the most frequent and/or severe errors when the program is run.
  • Law of Software Compatibility: If two programs are chosen at random, the probability that they are compatible is equal to zero.
  • Law of Option Preferences: When two people share a computer, their software option preferences will differ in every possible way.
  • Law of Expectation: Consumer expectations always outpace advances in software technology.
  • Law of the Titanic: Bug-free software isn't.

As you gain experience, you'll discover, and learn to live with, most aspects of Murphy's Laws. It's best that way. If neophytes were fully aware of all the things that could go wrong, they might avoid technology careers altogether. Then they'd miss out on all the benefits, and all the fun, that technology has to offer.



BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users