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DDOS attack


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#1 M. de Jager

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Posted 07 January 2015 - 02:20 PM

Hello,

 

Currently we are being ddosed on the home-network. 

 

How can we stop this, or what can we do against it?



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#2 mjd420nova

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Posted 07 January 2015 - 02:58 PM

i virus check from the SAFE modeHow did they get in??  Is it via router?  Or from something someone downloaded???  A through anti-virus check from the SAFE mode without networking should locate any problems.



#3 M. de Jager

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Posted 07 January 2015 - 03:01 PM

No virus, no idea how they get in... yes it was by router because nobody here had internet.



#4 mjd420nova

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Posted 07 January 2015 - 06:25 PM

A hard reset of the router to factory default settings without any internet access.  If the router has removal antennas, detach them.  Start from scratch and rebuild with new names and passwords.  Besides any encryption schemes, MAC address filtering  adds another level of control of who gets in.  It takes a little more time as you need to collect the addresses of all devices allowed on the network.  It also allows the restriction of those you suspect.



#5 M. de Jager

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Posted 08 January 2015 - 01:44 AM

Contacted my provider about it, will first see what they say.



#6 M. de Jager

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Posted 08 January 2015 - 03:31 PM

I've contacted the abuse team of my provider.



#7 Wodim

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Posted 22 January 2015 - 07:41 PM

If you don't have the biscuits to fight back, and whether the ISP can help you or not, you need to switch up some ID's. Switching up DNS servers, requesting new IP codes from the ISP, and changing the IP range on the routers, and or including firewalls could cut back on this or make it harder to constantly be traced.

 

Your MAC, if discovered, is the one code they will be able to hang on to you with. Although it is burned into computers by the vendors and manufacturers, there are apps that can help you to change the appearance of it while being connected.

 

Acquiring statistical reports from the routers would be a good idea if they are available.

 

If I were to deal with this issue, I would boot a live system, more preferably a Kali or BackTrack system and observe the Network from an uninfected point of view while taking extra precautions as to changing the MAC and other information before connecting to the Internet or network. With the proper tools at hand you could spy on your own infected computers to see who is attacking, or how the attack is being done. Sometimes a solution can be as simple as blocking IP addresses.

 



#8 Kilroy

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Posted 23 January 2015 - 06:37 AM

How do you know it was a DDOS attack?  Normally DDOS attacks aren't on an individual.

 

If no one has Internet access first steps are to reset your modem and router.  If your router is using the default administrator password you need to update your router firmware and change the administrator password.






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