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Learning both software and webware coding the same time?


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#1 auto1571

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Posted 04 January 2015 - 06:44 PM

My question is to you experienced coder is would it be practical to learn both web based and software coding at the same or would you agree to complete one and then move onto the other. I like the idea of learning both and making stuff with both as I would like to be able to create things both software and web based in the future. I am going to go back and do some stuff with code acadamy until I complete that I guess and then see what web based coding language I like the most. As for the software based I know I would like to try and use VB, C and then C++ and learn them in that order?

So what do you guys think about this?



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#2 Billy O'Neal

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Posted 04 January 2015 - 10:35 PM

Being web-based doesn't really change software development all that much. Learn how to build software and build something you want to build. The specific language is less of an issue although starting with something that maps well to your problem domain or is commonly used by solutions within your problem domain will probably be helpful.

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#3 auto1571

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Posted 05 January 2015 - 09:47 PM

Being web-based doesn't really change software development all that much. Learn how to build software and build something you want to build. The specific language is less of an issue although starting with something that maps well to your problem domain or is commonly used by solutions within your problem domain will probably be helpful.

 

 

So your saying to learn software first as after that it won't be that hard to lean web base anyway? Also what would recommend as a first choice? Would you say the oder in which I listed them is a good way to do it?

 

Thanks



#4 Billy O'Neal

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Posted 06 January 2015 - 03:44 PM

Yes -- there isn't that much web-specific to know as far as I am aware.

I wouldn't recommend a first choice. I would recommend choosing something you want to do first and picking something that maps well to that.

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#5 auto1571

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Posted 06 January 2015 - 06:56 PM

You mean like chosing something to create first and then find the appropriate program? And you would still say software first and web later; not at the same time? Thanks.



#6 Billy O'Neal

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Posted 06 January 2015 - 08:29 PM

Yes, that. As for software first/web later, that depends on what you want to build. If you want to build a web service, then by all means start with web stuff.

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#7 Angoid

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Posted 07 January 2015 - 10:40 AM

To add to that, having a project is a pretty good way to learn a programming language.

 

As you come across things you don't know, you'll have to find them out.

 

If you're new to programming, then the chances are good that any problem you face will have been encountered before and documented somewhere on the Web, either in an article, tutorial or in question on a forum.

 

If you're wanting to learn a language, I'd suggest the following:

1) Think of a project to work on that would be suited to the language you have in mind

2) Make sure you have the tools to develop in that language to hand

3) Write your code, and solve each problem and error as you encounter it


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#8 auto1571

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Posted 22 March 2015 - 08:01 AM

Sorry to bring this up again but would you not recommend something like a foundation to programming in general first or that doesn't really matter either? If so where would be the best place to start?

 

After searching around I have seen a whole load of differing opinions on all kinds of languages. I have made my mind up to try and write software but cannot make my mind up as to whether learn first C, C++ or C#. I did read somewhere that the advantage of C and C++ you can write software for more than one computer platform rather then just Windows. And I also read somewhere that C# is not very popular among experienced programmers although I can't remember why. However I think that's probably again opinion based.

 

So I thought the best thing to do is reply here again. Over to you.



#9 JohnnyJammer

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Posted 22 March 2015 - 10:40 PM

personally, i started with some GUi based applications in VB.NET 2010 IDE (After i already learn Ruby and Python (Scripting)). I started with soem simple file move/copy/paste with buttons to browser folders.

Then i moved towards automated tasks with very little input, getting security information from domain controlelrs etc when the application starts.

Then try somethign like adding network drives to a GUI based on the Users Group.

 

i then started moving to other thinsg such as gettign info from GPS data and creating a KML file packet and opening google earth to the specific place from GPD coordinates.

Then after that and feeling pretty flash i then starting making my own proejct management software, it used the windows calander to select date/date ranges and with some data input then saves to an sql database.

This can be used to book equipment,rooms, etc etc.

 

If i where you, i would start with something like a simple web browser with some buttons and some printing capabilities.


Edited by JohnnyJammer, 22 March 2015 - 10:41 PM.





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