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Linux Mint System Monitor versus Conky


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#1 Al1000

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Posted 04 January 2015 - 06:38 PM

Bear in mind that this laptop has a single core AMD Sempron 3000+ CPU, and the more powerful the CPU the less pronounced the difference will be, but check this out:

 

Linux Mint 13 MATE with Conky System Monitor the only application running, CPU usage to the nearest 1%, is 0%. As you can see from the list of processes in the Conky display, Conky itself is the top running process, using 0.33% of the CPU's processing power.

 

Screenshot_zps3f9a597d.png

 

Open Mint System Monitor, and CPU usage "settles down" to around 28%, and as you can see from the list of processes in Conky, it's Mint System Monitor and the graphics (Xorg) required to display it, that account for just about all of it!

 

Screenshot-1_zpsac0e17d4.png

 

So if you're using Mint and want an accurate idea of how much CPU resources your operating system by itself is using:

sudo apt-get install conky-all

Edited by Al1000, 04 January 2015 - 06:39 PM.


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#2 NickAu

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Posted 04 January 2015 - 08:50 PM

There is a bunch of nice Conky themes here. http://www.noobslab.com/2012/07/conky-collection-for-ubuntulinux.html



#3 Al1000

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Posted 05 January 2015 - 11:50 AM

Here is my new Conky for Mint:

Screenshot_zps2c0ff503.png

The only thing I still have to (find out how to) adjust is the horizontal alignment in the list of processes display.

#4 cat1092

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Posted 17 January 2015 - 03:18 AM

 

Bear in mind that this laptop has a single core AMD Sempron 3000+ CPU, and the more powerful the CPU the less pronounced the difference will be, but check this out:

 

 

Trust me, that's more than I have in my IBM ThinkPad T42, no matter how much it would "settle down", LXLE would still show over 50% CPU usage, despite the fact it it's a Pentium M (Dothan) 1.73GHz CPU  with 2MB of L2 cache. 

 

At any rate, I like Conky & will be installing it on all of my Linux Mint installs, neat app to have.  :thumbup2:

 

Thanks for the creation of this very useful Topic that should serve many Linux users, even many non-members who follows the forum & just likes to read the latest Topics.  :)

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#5 Al1000

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Posted 20 January 2015 - 11:19 AM

I have conky installed on every Linux distro I use except live CDs, and I have considered installing it to them too. (EDIT: I haven't installed it to Kali Linux on usb, yet, but I do have it installed to Puppy on usb).

There are two roads that new conky users can go down, either install a fancy looking conky such as the ones in the link Nick posted, or else start with the basic conky and modify it yourself. That is assuming you wouldn't stick with the default flickery black and white display, which I reckon they made that way so it would work on any computer. It just so happens that it was a conky configuration file I modified in my How To Use Nano thread, so I'll post a link here:

http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/560166/how-to-edit-a-file-using-nano-text-editor/

The last time I installed conky I just installed the basic package, which can be installed by swapping "conky" for "conky-all" in the command in the OP. It can display everything I want to display, so there is no advantage for me in installing conky-all, and both default displays look exactly the same so I'm not even sure what the difference between the two packages is.

I have always stuck to installing the basic conky (or conky-all), rather than use any of the heavier-weight versions such as the ones in the link that Nick posted. But that is just a personal choice, and other folk might want more from their conky than I do.

Here is the conky I use on my other computer, the only difference in the displays being this one displays usage and temperature information for both cores of the CPU; my laptop only has a single core CPU.

snapshot13_zps166cb283.jpeg

Note that conky is only using 0.17% of CPU resources on that computer, which is far from state of the art, but is a lot more powerful than my laptop. As the documentation mentions, conky can be used to display just about anything, but the more you make it display the more system resources it uses; and so I like to keep my conky displays minimal.

The "proper" way to install conky according to the documentation, is not to edit the conky.conf file but to create a .conkyrc file in your home folder, and edit that instead; but I never got as far as reading the documentation before the first time I installed conky and started editing the configuration file. I've stuck to doing it that way, even when I found out about .conkyrc files, because the only advantage I can see is that you wouldn't need to use sudo to edit a file in your home folder, whereas you do to edit a file in /etc

So apart from that I don't see the advantage of creating a .conkyrc file, if you only want one conky display (including on each desktop), as it just means having one more file on your computer. When you first install the basic conky (or conky-all) it just uses the conky.conf file anyway.

In fact, the first .conkyrc file I have had was on LXLE on the conky that it came installed with, but I just deleted it and edited the conky.conf file instead.

In any case, whether you create a .conkyrc file or just edit the conky.conf file that's already there, folk who go down the road of modifying the basic conky themselves will find conky threads such as this one on the Mint forum and this one on the Ubuntu forum useful. When you see a conky you like the look of, just copy the script, or whatever part of it you want, into your own conky.conf or .conkyrc file. You might need to adjust the display parameters of a script that displays conky with a transparent background on KDE for example, to get it to look the same on a MATE desktop.

It doesn't take long to get the hang of which part of the script does what, by simply comparing what it says to the conky display that it produces.

Here's the official conky website:

http://conky.sourceforge.net/

And this information should be particularly useful, and also become clear, when you're editing your conky.conf or .conkyrc file.

http://conky.sourceforge.net/config_settings.html

Edited by Al1000, 20 January 2015 - 11:31 AM.


#6 cat1092

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Posted 21 January 2015 - 03:43 AM

Al1000, thanks for the additional resources, I installed Conky on one computer, and it took up a lot of space on the right hand side, from nearly top to bottom. 

 

Figured you had a way to tame it as shown, will have to practice on one of my notebooks to get it right. Have an app called "Rainmeter" to show some of these things on Windows (though not quite as much detail), a gadget for my Linux OS's would be nice haves too. While I'm sure there are others, Conky shows a lot of details, like that it shows the CPU temps. 

 

Speaking of which over time, having this app can be good, if one notices rises in temps over a few month's time, that means for notebook users, at a minimum, it's time to use an air duster in the exhaust grooves, preferably with some components removed to blow as much dust as possible out. Could also mean it's time to reapply thermal paste (as noted below, MX-4 is great paste) on the CPU (& optional GPU), after cleaning the old off the heatsink & CPU, as well as GPU, if installed, surfaces. It's also a good thing with some older fans to apply just a tiny drop of 3 & 1 oil to the fan bearing. More is too much, don't want it dropping on the components. Just in case, let it stand, check for excess & carefully wipe this off. It may be best to place this drop on a toothpick & then the bearing (the center metal pin of the fan). Your hardware will last much longer by a good cleaning. 

 

For desktop PC users, this is an easier task, get a 2 pack of the dusters (marketed under brands such as "Ultra Duster"), what many incorrectly calls "canned air". Take the PC outdoors if possible and give the interior a good blowing out, being careful not to get too close to the MB surfaces, it works best from a 6 to 8 inch distance. Then carry it back indoors to a safe working area (uncarpeted), remove the heatsink, clean it up really good, along with the CPU surface, being sure not to press too hard, don't want to crack the MB. Allow to dry and use a good brand thermal paste (MX-4 is my favorite and what many enthusiasts uses), applying a small amount, a pea or oat size is good, place the heatsink back on, and very gently wiggle it, to make the paste spread, then using the supplied clamps or screws, secure it to the MB. make sure that all wires are snug, place the cover back on & fire it up. 

 

Temps should drop by a good amount. If not, a new fan may be needed. 

 

Didn't mean for this to become a cleaning tutorial, but if one is going to use Conky for monitoring, always keep an eye on heat patterns, it's more than for CPU/GPU/RAM usage. Write it down if needed when installing the app, if after a few months to a couple of years, heat has steadily increased, or has in a short period, Conky is alerting the user something's up. Cleaning normally does the trick.  :thumbup2:

 

No sense in having these gadgets if one isn't going to use them. :)

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#7 Al1000

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Posted 21 January 2015 - 06:22 AM

Al1000, thanks for the additional resources, I installed Conky on one computer, and it took up a lot of space on the right hand side, from nearly top to bottom.


Which conky did you install? The default display on the basic conky (and conky-all) should be relatively small, unless you are using a low screen resolution?

After my laptop cut out due to excessive heat when I was updating Package Manager in Lucid Puppy last week, which entails the CPU maxing out for around 20 minutes, I decided it was time to clean it properly. So I took it apart and vacuumed it, and what a difference that made! Now for the most part, the fan only runs occasionally instead of most of the time. And when the CPU is maxing out temperature never rises above the low 60s, and the fan runs relatively slowly.

It's also interesting to keep an eye on the top running processes, and on my laptop, the CPU frequency. CPU frequency on my desktop pc remains constant, but it scales on my laptop at either 800MHz, 1600MHz or 1800MHz depending on demand.

#8 cat1092

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Posted 22 January 2015 - 02:26 AM

It was one of those that was linked, will try another & see how it goes. 

 

You know how it is, installing new software, one might not get it right the 1st time. My desktop resolution is 1920x1080, on another monitor it's 1600x900. 

 

May have installed the wrong one. I see too, it's not a straight .deb download, which I prefer. I use text editors for tweaking, but only those where the instructions are clear & precise, as well as the Terminal when needed, but again, only as to the latter, either under the advice of someone assisting me, or from a reliable source. My luck with tar.gz files aren't good. 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#9 NickAu

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Posted 22 January 2015 - 05:32 AM

Al1000, thanks for the additional resources, I installed Conky on one computer, and it took up a lot of space on the right hand side, from nearly top to bottom.

You can easily edit your conky position
 
Open  ~/.conkyrc
 
In order to position your conky on your screen, modify these settings:
alignment top_right Your conky gets placed in the top right corner of your desktop ( You can change this bit to top_Left bottom_right etc)
gap_x 18 (horizontal gap)
gap_y 20 ( Vertical Gap )

Edited by NickAu, 22 January 2015 - 05:39 AM.


#10 Al1000

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Posted 22 January 2015 - 05:51 AM

It was one of those that was linked, will try another & see how it goes.



You know how it is, installing new software, one might not get it right the 1st time. My desktop resolution is 1920x1080, on another monitor it's 1600x900.



May have installed the wrong one. I see too, it's not a straight .deb download, which I prefer. I use text editors for tweaking, but only those where the instructions are clear & precise, as well as the Terminal when needed, but again, only as to the latter, either under the advice of someone assisting me, or from a reliable source. My luck with tar.gz files aren't good.

Ah, the non-basic versions of conky have all sorts of sizes of displays, and some have multiple displays too.

The default display in the basic conky (or conky-all) should look around the same size as the conky in the screenshots in the OP, on a 1024 x 768 resolution, so would be much smaller with the resolutions you are using.

I don't ever recall having installed conky from a tar.gz file.


Edited by Al1000, 22 January 2015 - 05:53 AM.


#11 NickAu

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Posted 22 January 2015 - 06:02 AM

 

Ah, the non-basic versions of conky have all sorts of sizes of displays, and some have multiple displays too.

Oh yes.

 

This.

 

16iiovd.jpg

 

Looks like this.

gap_x 20
gap_y 10
alignment middle_right
update_interval 0.5
use_xft yes
xftfont BahamasLight:size=8:bold
own_window yes
own_window_type override
own_window_transparent yes
own_window_colour 000000
own_window_hints undecorated,below,sticky,skip_taskbar,skip_pager
own_window_argb_visual no
own_window_argb_value 0
double_buffer yes
draw_shades no
draw_graph_borders no
uppercase yes
default_bar_size 0 4
default_graph_size 0 24
border_inner_margin 16
default_color FFFFFF

minimum_size 0 0
TEXT

${color}
${alignc}${nodename} linux ${machine} ${kernel}
${alignc}${exec lscpu | grep -i "model name" | cut -c 24-}

${color 2E2EFE}thread1${alignr}thread2${color red}
${cpugraph cpu1 32, 130}${alignr}${cpugraph cpu2 32, 130}
${color 2E2EFE}${cpu cpu1}%${alignr}${cpu cpu2}% 
${color red}core1 ${execi 5 sensors | grep 'Core 0' | awk '{print $3}'} degrees${alignr}${color 2E2EFE}

thread3${alignr}thread4
${color red}${cpugraph cpu3 32, 130}${alignr}${cpugraph cpu4 32, 130}
${color 2E2EFE}${cpu cpu3}%${alignr}${cpu cpu4}%
${color red}core2 ${execi 5 sensors | grep 'Core 1' | awk '{print $3}'} degrees${alignr}
${color yellow}${top name 1}${alignr}${top cpu 1}%
${top name 2}${alignr}${top cpu 2}%
${top name 3}${alignr}${top cpu 3}%
${top name 4}${alignr}${top cpu 4}%
${color red}total${alignr} ${cpu}%

${color green}${exec nvidia-settings -q gpus | grep -i "GeForce" | awk '{print $3}'} ${exec nvidia-settings -q gpus | grep -i "GeForce" | awk '{print $4}'} ${exec nvidia-settings -q gpus | grep -i "GeForce" | awk '{print $5}'}${hr 1}
GPU Temp: ${alignr}${nvidia temp} C
Fan Speed: ${alignr}${execi 5 nvidia-settings -q [fan:0]/GPUCurrentFanSpeed -t} %
GPU Clock: ${alignr}${nvidia gpufreq} MHz
Mem Clock: ${alignr}${nvidia memfreq} MHz
Mem Used: ${alignr}${execi 5 nvidia-settings -q [gpu:0]/UsedDedicatedGPUMemory -t} / ${exec nvidia-settings -q [gpu:0]/TotalDedicatedGPUMemory -t} MiB
${color purple}${memgraph}
${membar}
${color purple}ram usage${alignr} ${memperc}%${color yellow}
${top_mem name 1}${alignr}${top_mem pid 1}${alignc}${top_mem mem 1}%
${top_mem name 2}${alignr}${top_mem pid 2}${alignc}${top_mem mem 2}%
${top_mem name 3}${alignr}${top_mem pid 3}${alignc}${top_mem mem 3}%
${top_mem name 4}${alignr}${top_mem pid 4}${alignc}${top_mem mem 4}%
${color purple}total${alignr} ${mem}/${memmax}
${color 819FF7}
sda1 ${hr 1}
/${alignr}${fs_size /}
${fs_bar /}
${fs_used_perc /}%${alignr}${fs_used /}

sda2 ${hr 1}
/home${alignr} ${fs_size /home}
${fs_bar /home}
${fs_used_perc /home}%${alignr}${fs_used /home}

sda3 ${hr 1}
/swap ${alignr} ${swapmax}
${swapbar /home}
${swapperc}%${alignr}${swap}
${color yellow}
disk read${alignr}disk write
${diskiograph_read 32, 130}${alignr}${diskiograph_write 32, 130}
${diskio_read}${alignr}${diskio_write}

${color green}lan${hr 1}
enp4s0${alignr} ${addr enp4s0}
up ${downspeed enp4s0}${alignr}down ${upspeed enp4s0}
${upspeedgraph enp4s0 32, 130}${alignr}${downspeedgraph enp4s0 32, 130}
total ${totaldown enp4s0}${alignr}total ${totalup enp4s0}

${color 00FF40}usb${hr 1}
${if_existing /dev/sdb1}${exec df -h | grep "sdb1" | cut -c -38} $else $endif
${if_existing /dev/sdc1}${exec df -h | grep "sdc1" | cut -c -38}
${if_existing /dev/sdd1}${exec df -h | grep "sdd1" | cut -c -38}
${if_existing /dev/sde1}${exec df -h | grep "sde1" | cut -c -38}

This is cool.

h1QOeXu.png

background yes
update_interval 1
 
cpu_avg_samples 2
net_avg_samples 2
temperature_unit celsius
 
double_buffer yes
no_buffers yes
text_buffer_size 2048
 
gap_x 10
gap_y 30
minimum_size 190 450
maximum_width 190
own_window yes
own_window_type override
own_window_transparent yes
own_window_hints undecorate,sticky,skip_taskbar,skip_pager,below
border_inner_margin 0
border_outer_margin 0
alignment tr
 
draw_shades no
draw_outline no
draw_borders no
draw_graph_borders no
 
override_utf8_locale yes
use_xft yes
xftfont ubuntu:size=8
xftalpha 0.5
uppercase no
 
default_color FFFFFF
color1 DDDDDD
color2 AAAAAA
color3 888888
color4 666666
 
lua_load ~/.conky/conky_grey.lua
lua_draw_hook_post main
 
TEXT
${voffset 35}
${goto 95}${color4}${font ubuntu:size=22}${time %e}${color1}${offset -50}${font ubuntu:size=10}${time %A}
${goto 85}${color2}${voffset -2}${font ubuntu:size=9}${time %b}${voffset -2} ${color3}${font ubuntu:size=12}${time %Y}${font}
 
${voffset 90}
${goto 110}${font ubuntu:size=7,weight:bold}${color}CPU
${goto 100}${hwmon temp 2} C ${hwmon temp 3} C
${goto 90}${font ubuntu:size=7,weight:normal}${color1}${top name 1}${alignr}${top cpu 1}%
${goto 90}${font ubuntu:size=7,weight:normal}${color2}${top name 2}${alignr}${top cpu 2}%
${goto 90}${font ubuntu:size=7,weight:normal}${color3}${top name 3}${alignr}${top cpu 3}%
${goto 90}${cpugraph 10,100 666666 666666}
${goto 90}${voffset -10}${font ubuntu:size=7,weight:normal}${color}${threads} process
 
${voffset 5}
${goto 110}${font ubuntu:size=7,weight:bold}${color}MEM
 
 
 
${goto 90}${font ubuntu:size=7,weight:normal}${color1}${top_mem name 1}${alignr}${top_mem mem 1}%
${goto 90}${font ubuntu:size=7,weight:normal}${color2}${top_mem name 2}${alignr}${top_mem mem 2}%
${goto 90}${font ubuntu:size=7,weight:normal}${color3}${top_mem name 3}${alignr}${top_mem mem 3}%
 
${voffset 30}
${goto 110}${font ubuntu:size=7,weight:bold}${color}DISKS
${goto 90}${diskiograph 30,100 666666 666666}${voffset -30}
 
${goto 90}${font ubuntu:size=7,weight:normal}${color}used:${fs_used /home} /home
${goto 90}${font ubuntu:size=7,weight:normal}${color}used:${fs_used /} /
 
${voffset 25}
${goto 110}${font ubuntu:size=7,weight:bold}${color}LAN ${color3}
${goto 45}....Up${alignr}${upspeedgraph enp5s8 10,1 222222 AF00FF}
${goto 45}....Down${alignr}${downspeedgraph enp5s8 10,1 222222 C61300}
${voffset -25}${alignr}${upspeed enp5s8}
${alignr}${downspeed enp5s8}
 
${voffset 20}
${goto 70}${font ubuntu:size=18,weight:bold}${color3}NET${alignr}${color2}${font ubuntu:size=7,weight:bold}${color1}${if_up eth0}eth ${addr eth0} ${endif}${if_up wlan0}wifi ${addr wlan0}${endif}
${goto 90}${font ubuntu:size=7,weight:bold}${color}open ports: ${alignr}${color2}${tcp_portmon 1 65535 count}
${goto 90}${font ubuntu:size=7,weight:bold}${color}${offset 10}IP${alignr}DPORT
${goto 90}${font ubuntu:size=7,weight:normal}${color1}${tcp_portmon 1 65535 rip  0}${alignr 1}${tcp_portmon 1 65535 rport  0}
${goto 90}${font ubuntu:size=7,weight:normal}${color1}${tcp_portmon 1 65535 rip  1}${alignr 1}${tcp_portmon 1 65535 rport  1}
${goto 90}${font ubuntu:size=7,weight:normal}${color1}${tcp_portmon 1 65535 rip  2}${alignr 1}${tcp_portmon 1 65535 rport  2}
${goto 90}${font ubuntu:size=7,weight:normal}${color1}${tcp_portmon 1 65535 rip  3}${alignr 1}${tcp_portmon 1 65535 rport  3}
${goto 90}${font ubuntu:size=7,weight:normal}${color1}${tcp_portmon 1 65535 rip  4}${alignr 1}${tcp_portmon 1 65535 rport  4}
${goto 90}${font ubuntu:size=7,weight:normal}${color1}${tcp_portmon 1 65535 rip  5}${alignr 1}${tcp_portmon 1 65535 rport  5}
${goto 90}${font ubuntu:size=7,weight:normal}${color1}${tcp_portmon 1 65535 rip  6}${alignr 1}${tcp_portmon 1 65535 rport  6}
${goto 90}${font ubuntu:size=7,weight:normal}${color1}${tcp_portmon 1 65535 rip  7}${alignr 1}${tcp_portmon 1 65535 rport  7}
${goto 90}${font ubuntu:size=7,weight:normal}${color1}${tcp_portmon 1 65535 rip  8}${alignr 1}${tcp_portmon 1 65535 rport  8}
${goto 90}${font ubuntu:size=7,weight:normal}${color1}${tcp_portmon 1 65535 rip  9}${alignr 1}${tcp_portmon 1 65535 rport  9}
${goto 90}${font ubuntu:size=7,weight:normal}${color1}${tcp_portmon 1 65535 rip 10}${alignr 1}${tcp_portmon 1 65535 rport 10}
${goto 90}${font ubuntu:size=7,weight:normal}${color1}${tcp_portmon 1 65535 rip 11}${alignr 1}${tcp_portmon 1 65535 rport 11}
${goto 90}${font ubuntu:size=7,weight:normal}${color1}${tcp_portmon 1 65535 rip 12}${alignr 1}${tcp_portmon 1 65535 rport 12}
${goto 90}${font ubuntu:size=7,weight:normal}${color1}${tcp_portmon 1 65535 rip 13}${alignr 1}${tcp_portmon 1 65535 rport 13}
${goto 90}${font ubuntu:size=7,weight:normal}${color1}${tcp_portmon 1 65535 rip 14}${alignr 1}${tcp_portmon 1 65535 rport 14}

You really don't want to see the config to this LOL

 

14171572855_b81e91df54_o.png


Edited by NickAu, 22 January 2015 - 06:08 AM.


#12 Al1000

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Posted 22 January 2015 - 06:27 AM

Very cool. Interesting to note that "own_window_transparent" is set to "yes" in both scripts you posted, but the window is not transparent. Here is the conky I'm using with LXLE which started off as the basic conky, and which looks exactly the same as the conky I used in Mint in post #3

 

I've also found that using hwmon to read CPU temperature, uses less system resources than using lm-sensors and does the same job.

double_buffer yes

own_window yes

own_window_transparent yes

own_window_type normal

own_window_class Conky

own_window_hints undecorated below

alignment top_right

background yes

border_width 0

cpu_avg_samples 2

default_color white

default_outline_color white

default_shade_color white

draw_borders no

draw_graph_borders no

draw_outline no

draw_shades no

use_xft yes

xftfont Sans Mono:size=9

gap_x 20

gap_y 40

minimum_size 5 5

net_avg_samples 2

no_buffers yes

out_to_console no

out_to_stderr no

extra_newline no

stippled_borders 1

update_interval 3.0

uppercase no

use_spacer none

show_graph_scale no

show_graph_range no



TEXT

${color}${scroll 16 $nodename - $sysname $kernel on $machine | }

Uptime: $uptime

${color green}$hr

${color}RAM Usage: $mem/$memmax - $memperc% ${membar 4}

Swap Usage: $swap/$swapmax - $swapperc% ${swapbar 4}

${color green}$hr

${color}CPU Usage: $cpu% ${cpubar 4}

CPU Temp: ${hwmon temp 1}C

Frequency: ${freq}MHz

${color green}$hr

${color}File systems:/ ${fs_free /}/${fs_size /} ${fs_bar 6 /}

${color green}$hr

${color}Networking:

Up: ${upspeed wlan0} k/s     Down: ${downspeed wlan0} k/s

${color green}$hr

${color}Processes: $processes   Running: $running_processes

${color green}$hr

${color}Name                         PID   CPU%  MEM%

${top name 1}${alignr}${top pid 1} ${top cpu 1} ${top mem 1}

${top name 2}${alignr}${top pid 2} ${top cpu 2} ${top mem 2}

${top name 3}${alignr}${top pid 3} ${top cpu 3} ${top mem 3}

${top name 4}${alignr}${top pid 4} ${top cpu 4} ${top mem 4}

${top name 5}${alignr}${top pid 5} ${top cpu 5} ${top mem 5}




Edited by Al1000, 22 January 2015 - 06:28 AM.


#13 NickAu

NickAu

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Posted 22 January 2015 - 06:47 AM

I use this one

 

2w7ixih.png

 

Please note I did not create this conky.

settings_table = {
	{
		-- Edit this table to customise your rings.
		-- You can create more rings simply by adding more elements to settings_table.
		-- "name" is the type of stat to display; you can choose from 'cpu', 'memperc', 'fs_used_perc', 'battery_used_perc'.
		name='time',
		-- "arg" is the argument to the stat type, e.g. if in Conky you would write ${cpu cpu0}, 'cpu0' would be the argument. If you would not use an argument in the Conky variable, use ''.
		arg='%I.%M',
		-- "max" is the maximum value of the ring. If the Conky variable outputs a percentage, use 100.
		max=12,
		-- "bg_colour" is the colour of the base ring.
		bg_colour=0xFFFFFF,
		-- "bg_alpha" is the alpha value of the base ring.
		bg_alpha=0.1,
		-- "fg_colour" is the colour of the indicator part of the ring.
		fg_colour=0xD0FF00,
		-- "fg_alpha" is the alpha value of the indicator part of the ring.
		fg_alpha=0.9,
		-- "x" and "y" are the x and y coordinates of the centre of the ring, relative to the top left corner of the Conky window.
		x=67, y=61,
		-- "radius" is the radius of the ring.
		radius=30,
		-- "thickness" is the thickness of the ring, centred around the radius.
		thickness=2,
		-- "start_angle" is the starting angle of the ring, in degrees, clockwise from top. Value can be either positive or negative.
		start_angle=0,
		-- "end_angle" is the ending angle of the ring, in degrees, clockwise from top. Value can be either positive or negative, but must be larger than start_angle.
		end_angle=360
	},
	{
		name='cpu',
		arg='cpu0',
		max=100,
		bg_colour=0xFFFFFF,
		bg_alpha=0.1,
		fg_colour=0xD0FF00,
		fg_alpha=0.5,
		x=67, y=187,
		radius=30,
		thickness=2,
		start_angle=-90,
		end_angle=180
	},
	{
		name='memperc',
		arg='',
		max=100,
		bg_colour=0xFFFFFF,
		bg_alpha=0.1,
		fg_colour=0xD0FF00,
		fg_alpha=0.9,
		x=67, y=313,
		radius=30,
		thickness=2,
		start_angle=-90,
		end_angle=180
	},
	{
		name='swapperc',
		arg='',
		max=100,
		bg_colour=0xFFFFFF,
		bg_alpha=0.1,
		fg_colour=0xD0FF00,
		fg_alpha=0.9,
		x=67, y=313,
		radius=20,
		thickness=2,
		start_angle=-90,
		end_angle=180
	},
	{
		name='fs_used_perc',
		arg='/',
		max=100,
		bg_colour=0xFFFFFF,
		bg_alpha=0.1,
		fg_colour=0xD0FF00,
		fg_alpha=0.9,
		x=67, y=439,
		radius=30,
		thickness=2,
		start_angle=-90,
		end_angle=180
	},
	{
		name='fs_used_perc',
		arg='/home',
		max=100,
		bg_colour=0xFFFFFF,
		bg_alpha=0.1,
		fg_colour=0xD0FF00,
		fg_alpha=0.9,
		x=67, y=439,
		radius=20,
		thickness=2,
		start_angle=-90,
		end_angle=180
	},
	
		
}

-- Use these settings to define the origin and extent of your clock.

clock_r=29

-- "clock_x" and "clock_y" are the coordinates of the centre of the clock, in pixels, from the top left of the Conky window.

clock_x=67
clock_y=61

show_seconds=true

require 'cairo'
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
--                                                                 rgb_to_r_g_b
-- converts color in hexa to decimal
--
function rgb_to_r_g_b(colour, alpha)
    return ((colour / 0x10000) % 0x100) / 255., ((colour / 0x100) % 0x100) / 255., (colour % 0x100) / 255., alpha
end
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


function draw_ring(cr,t,pt)
	local w,h=conky_window.width,conky_window.height
	
	local xc,yc,ring_r,ring_w,sa,ea=pt['x'],pt['y'],pt['radius'],pt['thickness'],pt['start_angle'],pt['end_angle']
	local bgc, bga, fgc, fga=pt['bg_colour'], pt['bg_alpha'], pt['fg_colour'], pt['fg_alpha']

	local angle_0=sa*(2*math.pi/360)-math.pi/2
	local angle_f=ea*(2*math.pi/360)-math.pi/2
	local t_arc=t*(angle_f-angle_0)

	-- Draw background ring

	cairo_arc(cr,xc,yc,ring_r,angle_0,angle_f)
	cairo_set_source_rgba(cr,rgb_to_r_g_b(bgc,bga))
	cairo_set_line_width(cr,ring_w)
	cairo_stroke(cr)
	
	-- Draw indicator ring

	cairo_arc(cr,xc,yc,ring_r,angle_0,angle_0+t_arc)
	cairo_set_source_rgba(cr,rgb_to_r_g_b(fgc,fga))
	cairo_stroke(cr)		
end

function draw_clock_hands(cr,xc,yc)
	local secs,mins,hours,secs_arc,mins_arc,hours_arc
	local xh,yh,xm,ym,xs,ys
	
	secs=os.date("%S")	
	mins=os.date("%M")
	hours=os.date("%I")
		
	secs_arc=(2*math.pi/60)*secs
	mins_arc=(2*math.pi/60)*mins+secs_arc/60
	hours_arc=(2*math.pi/12)*hours+mins_arc/12
		
	-- Draw hour hand
	
	xh=xc+0.7*clock_r*math.sin(hours_arc)
	yh=yc-0.7*clock_r*math.cos(hours_arc)
	cairo_move_to(cr,xc,yc)
	cairo_line_to(cr,xh,yh)
	
	cairo_set_line_cap(cr,CAIRO_LINE_CAP_ROUND)
	cairo_set_line_width(cr,5)
	cairo_set_source_rgba(cr,0.9,0.9,0.9,0.3)
	cairo_stroke(cr)
	
	-- Draw minute hand
	
	xm=xc+clock_r*math.sin(mins_arc)
	ym=yc-clock_r*math.cos(mins_arc)
	cairo_move_to(cr,xc,yc)
	cairo_line_to(cr,xm,ym)
	
	cairo_set_line_width(cr,3)
	cairo_stroke(cr)
	
	-- Draw seconds hand
	
	if show_seconds then
		xs=xc+clock_r*math.sin(secs_arc)
		ys=yc-clock_r*math.cos(secs_arc)
		cairo_move_to(cr,xc,yc)
		cairo_line_to(cr,xs,ys)
	
		cairo_set_line_width(cr,1)
		cairo_set_source_rgba(cr,0.9,0.6,0.2,0.6)
		cairo_stroke(cr)
                
	end
end

function conky_clock_rings()
	local function setup_rings(cr,pt)
		local str=''
		local value=0
		
		str=string.format('${%s %s}',pt['name'],pt['arg'])
		str=conky_parse(str)
		
		value=tonumber(str)
		pct=value/pt['max']
		
		draw_ring(cr,pct,pt)
	end
	
	-- Check that Conky has been running for at least 5s

	if conky_window==nil then return end
	local cs=cairo_xlib_surface_create(conky_window.display,conky_window.drawable,conky_window.visual, conky_window.width,conky_window.height)
	
	local cr=cairo_create(cs)	
	
	local updates=conky_parse('${updates}')
	update_num=tonumber(updates)
	
	if update_num>5 then
		for i in pairs(settings_table) do
			setup_rings(cr,settings_table[i])
		end
	end
	
	draw_clock_hands(cr,clock_x,clock_y)
end





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