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Install Xp Professional Over Home


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#1 akg8r

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Posted 21 June 2006 - 12:00 PM

Can I install XP Professional over XP Home and not loose my files. Or is it like cleaning the computer in which I will loose everything?

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#2 Animal

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Posted 21 June 2006 - 12:57 PM

akg8r,

First of all let me say Welcome to Bleeping Computer.

Yes you can install Pro over Home. But you may want to take a look at this link to be sure thats what you want to do. Since a clean install of Pro will likely be a less "buggy" OS. http://www.quepublishing.com/articles/arti...=31080&rl=1

Be (Upgrade) Safe

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#3 akg8r

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Posted 21 June 2006 - 01:40 PM

So I tried doing the upgrade and got an error message after selecting the partition. The error message states "An error occurrsed while Setup was updating partition information on: 38155 MS Disk 0 Id 0 on bus 0 on atapi [MBR]. Setup cannot continue. To quiet Setup, Press F3."

I'm getting so frustrated with this. Honestly, I believe that my hard drive is dying and I did not back up a few files and desperately need to recover them. Have any other suggestions. I have a Laptop. I actually moved the hard drive to another laptop just to confirm that it was the hard drive.

Thanks for welcoming me. Hopefully, I will get help and be able to give assistance as well as learn alot.

Edited by akg8r, 21 June 2006 - 01:41 PM.


#4 Jesse Bassett

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Posted 21 June 2006 - 04:22 PM

What kind of PC/Laptop do you have?
Windows XP Media Center Edition 2005 l McAfee Total Protection l Super AntiSpyware Free Edition l AdAware SE Personal l Spyware Blaster l Spyware Guard l Safe Eyes 2007

#5 Enthusiast

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Posted 21 June 2006 - 11:27 PM

When you moved the hard drive to another laptop what happened?

What version of the Windows XP Pro CD do you have - a Retail full install edition or an upgrade edition, or is this a disk that came with a different computer?

Does it have a 25 digit license key number that has never been used in any other computer before? If it has been used previously or if it came with another computer it will not authenticate.

#6 akg8r

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Posted 22 June 2006 - 07:01 AM

To answer Jesse I have a DELL Inspiron 6000 but as a test transferred the hard drive to a DEL Latitude 1001.

To answer Enthusiast: When I moved the hard drive from the Inspiron to the Latitude I thought I was making progress because the Delete Restoration Screen came up. I went ahead and selected it then it said please install the hal.dll file. Someone mentioned that when I go ahead and try to locate all of that file then more than likely the system will say that another file is missing and so forth and so forth.

I know that it has something to do with Hibernation because it does not do the full script when "attempting" to start up. It says Resuming Windows and then goes to a blank screen. The last state that it was in was a hibernation state. I read up on Microsoft's website that they have a bug with hibernation they tell you how to fix but I can't get into my computer in order to fix it.

I've tried using a full Windows XP Pro disk and a reinstallation disk...neither of which came with my computer of course because I have the Home version.

I don't even get to the screen that says input the 25 digit code.

#7 Enthusiast

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Posted 22 June 2006 - 08:24 AM

The following may help:

fix for "Missing HAL.DLL," "Invalid Boot.Ini," and several other fatal startup errors, Fred Langa says.

http://www.informationweek.com/news/showAr...cleID=185301251

#8 akg8r

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Posted 22 June 2006 - 10:44 AM

I actually thought what that guy wrote was going to help me it sounded just like it would work. I had to do a chkdsk in order to do the bootcfg. But chkdsk did not complete successfully.

I am actually able to now do a delete restoration data and roceed to system boot menu and then I get the Windows XP screen but it then goes to a blue screen. Any suggestions?

#9 Jesse Bassett

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Posted 22 June 2006 - 10:59 AM

To answer Jesse I have a DELL Inspiron 6000 but as a test transferred the hard drive to a DEL Latitude 1001.


If that's the case, then yes, you can install XP Pro over XP Home. I too have a Dell Inspiron 6000 and have done what your going to do many times with no problems.


Peace,
Jesse
Windows XP Media Center Edition 2005 l McAfee Total Protection l Super AntiSpyware Free Edition l AdAware SE Personal l Spyware Blaster l Spyware Guard l Safe Eyes 2007

#10 Enthusiast

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Posted 22 June 2006 - 05:54 PM

What are the error message/s on the blue screen?

Here's more from Langa:

For example, if you already have some knowledge of the commands involved, many "Missing or corrupt HAL.DLL," "Invalid Boot.Ini," or "Windows could not start..." problems can be fixed with these five shortcut steps:
Boot from your XP Setup CD and enter the Recovery Console
Run "Attrib -H -R -S" on the C:\Boot.ini file
Delete the C:\Boot.ini file
Run "Bootcfg /Rebuild"
Run Fixboot
It really can be as simple as that!
But the first few times you try this repair, it makes sense to use the slightly longer but more certain "official" method, as outlined by Microsoft in a number of separate Knowledge Base articles. To save you time, we'll concatenate the instructions here.
Enter The Recovery Console
The safest, surest way to resolve problems such as "Missing or corrupt HAL.DLL," "Invalid Boot.Ini," or "Windows could not start..." is to boot the PC from an XP Setup CD and use the pristine, uncorrupted files and tools there to effect repairs. The one catch is that if your setup CD is significantly older than your current Windows version, you may have file compatibility problems. For example, you can hit snags if you use an original or SP1 XP Setup CD to try to repair an XP SP2 installation. You'll get a message to the effect that the version you're trying to upgrade is newer than the version on the CD.
The solution here is to use a "slipstreamed" setup CD, which adds the newer files to your original setup CD. This kind of updated setup CD can be used on just about any XP installation. It's a good idea to have an up-to-date, slipstreamed setup CD available in any case, as it simplifies all future installs and CD-based repairs.
Once you have a startup CD with the same version of system files as the PC you're working on, configure your PC to boot from CD if it isn't already set up that way. (You may need to enter the BIOS setup tool to configure the PC to boot from the CD.)
Start your PC with the XP Setup CD in the drive. When you see the "Press any key to boot from CD..." prompt, do so and let the CD-based boot process begin.
When the Recovery Console option is offered ("Press R to start the Recovery Console"), do so. You may be asked which Windows installation to enter, in which case type the number of the Windows installation you wish to work on (usually "1").
When prompted, enter the Administrator's password for that Windows installation.
At the command prompt, type "Bootcfg /Rebuild" (without the quotes) and hit enter. Windows will then scan the hard drive, looking for valid Windows installs and startup information.
The exact verbiage will depend on your setup, but after a few moments you'll see a prompt that says something like:
Total Identified Windows Installs: 1
[1] C:\Windows
Add Installation To Boot List?
Assuming the information you see is correct, enter "Y" for yes, and Bootcfg will start the process of rebuilding the boot list to include the indicated Windows installation. Along the way, it will repair most "Missing or corrupt HAL.DLL," "Invalid Boot.Ini," "Windows could not start...," and similar errors.
After a moment, you'll be asked to "Enter Load Identifier." This is the name of the operating system that will appear in boot menus. For consistency with the standard nomenclature used by Microsoft, enter "Microsoft Windows XP Professional" or "Microsoft Windows XP Home Edition" without the quotes and hit enter.
Next you'll be asked to "Enter OS Load Options." For normal installations, enter "/Fastdetect" (without the quotes) and hit enter.
In most cases, that's all it will take. You can type "Exit" to leave the Recovery Console and reboot the PC, which should then start normally.
But if you wish, or in cases where you suspect a problem with the boot sectors on the hard drive (as with problems in a dual- or multi-boot system that's become unstable, or where a third-party boot manager may have run amok), you can run Fixboot from the command line (without any parameters) prior to exiting the Recovery Console. This will write a new partition boot sector to the default drive, undoing any changes caused by dual-, multi-, or third-party boot processes. (You can reactivate those alternate boot methods later if you wish, but running Fixboot now simplifies the boot process and removes nonessential boot variables, which in turn helps ensure that the repaired XP installation will have the best chance of successful booting.)
After running Fixboot, type "Exit" to leave the Recovery Console and reboot the PC, which should then start normally.
Additional Options
A version of Bootcfg can also be run from inside Windows. Type "Bootcfg /?" (minus the quotes) in the Start/Run line to see the commands available that way. Note that the /Rebuild command isn't available from inside Windows; you can only run that from within the Recovery Console. (That makes sense because you only need to totally rebuild the boot information when Windows won't start normally.)
A /List command is also available only from within Recovery Console. It simply lists the entries already in the boot list, which can be useful for checking or as a learning tool.
You can also see entries already in the boot list from within Windows. Right-click on My Computer, then select Properties/Advanced/Startup and Recovery/Settings. The entries are shown in the System Startup portion of the dialog, and you can directly edit the Boot.Ini file by clicking the Edit button there.
You can also view and edit the startup entries via the Msconfig tool. Enter "Msconfig" on the Start/Run line, and you'll see numerous options for modifying the Boot.Ini and related files. The XP help system explains each option pretty well.
But none of these "edit from within Windows" options is available when Windows won't boot, which is why the Recovery Console's little-known Bootcfg /Rebuild command is so important and useful. If you know about this command and how to use it, you can potentially save yourself literally hours and hours of manually reinstalling or rebuilding a failed operating system!

Here's some from Kelly's Korner:
http://www.kellys-korner-xp.com/xp_haldll_missing.htm

Edited by Enthusiast, 22 June 2006 - 06:02 PM.





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