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can i improve my psu (diy) ?


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6 replies to this topic

#1 Guest_nickko_*

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Posted 30 December 2014 - 01:09 PM

hi to all,

 

i know that my question about psu is not that simple and the subject cannot be exhausted but i will try 

 

i have been told by a friend that i can improve my psu's efficiency and overall performance by replacing the stock capacitors and few other electronic components

 

this will cost me between 8 and 15 euros only and at the end i will have a much better psu 

 

i know about electronics but i do not know from where i have to start 

 

i have two spare psu that i wish to experiment (force 500 watts, xilense 350 watts)

 

i hope someone to give a guidance

 

many thanks in advance

 

happy new year to all

 

 

 

 



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#2 zingo156

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Posted 30 December 2014 - 01:23 PM

The short answer is no, not easily anyway, and I don't recommend trying, the stored energy of capacitors inside of a psu can kill instantly. It would take far more effort and engineering than it would be worth when you could just buy an already designed better power supply. Invest your time mowing some lawns or shoveling snow and buy a better psu, it is safer and less time consuming.


Edited by zingo156, 30 December 2014 - 01:27 PM.

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#3 DeimosChaos

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Posted 30 December 2014 - 01:54 PM

The short answer is no, not easily anyway, and I don't recommend trying, the stored energy of capacitors inside of a psu can kill instantly.

 

Absolutely right... DO NOT mess with the internal components of a power supply... EVER.

 

Especially if you do not know exactly what you are doing, even when you do it can be risky. Better off taking zingo's advice and just go get a new PSU that is more powerful.


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#4 JohnC_21

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Posted 30 December 2014 - 02:03 PM

It didn't work out too well for this person.

 

http://www.today.com/money/teen-electrocuted-while-taking-apart-unplugged-computer-1C6365434



#5 zingo156

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Posted 30 December 2014 - 02:11 PM

Good article John, to clearify a few things: the PSU is generally the only dangerous component in most desktops (outside of a desktop, tube style crt monitors and tv's are even more dangerous). All of the output (to your motherboard and other internal components) from standard atx power supplies is low voltage which would not likely electricute people under normal circumstances. Anything is possible (wet salty skin etc) and because the current output from psu's is sufficient to kill, caution is always needed.

 

The inside of a PSU is dangerous, it takes high voltage from the wall and often bumps this upwards of 320volts which is more than enough for electricity to be able to jump through a person and electricute. PSU's are generally built with bleeder resistors but still should not be opened and handled by anyone other than a qualified high voltage technician.

 

Total current is what kills but low voltage generally won't jump through a persons skin.


Edited by zingo156, 30 December 2014 - 02:46 PM.

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#6 Platypus

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Posted 30 December 2014 - 05:26 PM

If caught prior to failure, a PSU with suspect capacitors can be redeemed by replacing them with good quality substitutes. However it's questionable whether a PSU of the quality that uses such capacitors in the first place is worth troubling with.

 

The overall efficiency of a PSU is governed by its inherent design, as well as by the type and quality of components, so it's unlikely you could achieve any worthwhile improvement in efficiency by simple component substitution.


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#7 Guest_nickko_*

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Posted 02 January 2015 - 04:42 AM

happy new year to all

 

i apologize for the delay in reply back

 

i thank very much all of you that have answered to my post regarding how to further improve my pc psu

 

fully understood !!!

 

you have absolute right about the dangers !

 

it seems that it is not worthing to try any diy to further improve my pc psu

 

i will stay with what i have

 

thanks again for your answers

 

very happy and a very prosperous new year to all






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