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#1 TinkerTank

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Posted 22 December 2014 - 02:50 PM

Hi I've had my current system since 2007 when I spent my graduation gift on it and since then I've only upgraded the GPU about 3 times: the first two due to hardware burnout and the last time for performance increase. My system is starting to show its age however and now that i've come into some disposable income I'm looking to do a straight upgrade through the whole system. My budget is between $700 and $900 and I'm looking for recomendations on a new MOBO and processor specifically, a new GPU would also be nice but i'm thinking of just buying another of my current one and running SLI. my current setup is this:

CPU: AMD Phenom II X4 920

MOBO: XFX MD-A72P-7509

RAM: 8GB DDR2

GPU: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 560 Ti

OS: Win 7 Ultimate 64bit

Thanks.



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#2 DJBPace07

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Posted 23 December 2014 - 12:54 AM

What will you be using this PC for?  If you swap out your motherboard for a new one, you will need to repurchase a license for Windows if you are using an OEM/System Builder copy since those licenses are tied to the motherboard.  Full, boxed retail versions of Windows can be moved from one motherboard to another.

 

Given some of the issues with scaling, drivers, and game glitches, I suggest ignoring multi-GPU and simply getting one really powerful graphics card such as the GTX 970 or 980.

 

Given your budget, there are a number of good options for upgrading the motherboard, CPU, and RAM.  All builds are going to use DDR3 RAM, so take this into account when budgeting.  If you want to remain with AMD, an FX-8300 series processor paired with an AMD 970-based motherboard will be budget conscious but reasonably powerful for games.  If you have a little more money to spend, I would get a motherboard based off Intel's Z97 platform (The GIGABYTE GA-Z97X-SLI is a good choice) and either a high-end i5, such as the 4690K, or an i7, like the 4790K


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#3 TinkerTank

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Posted 23 December 2014 - 02:54 PM

What will you be using this PC for?  If you swap out your motherboard for a new one, you will need to repurchase a license for Windows if you are using an OEM/System Builder copy since those licenses are tied to the motherboard.  Full, boxed retail versions of Windows can be moved from one motherboard to another.

 

Given some of the issues with scaling, drivers, and game glitches, I suggest ignoring multi-GPU and simply getting one really powerful graphics card such as the GTX 970 or 980.

 

Given your budget, there are a number of good options for upgrading the motherboard, CPU, and RAM.  All builds are going to use DDR3 RAM, so take this into account when budgeting.  If you want to remain with AMD, an FX-8300 series processor paired with an AMD 970-based motherboard will be budget conscious but reasonably powerful for games.  If you have a little more money to spend, I would get a motherboard based off Intel's Z97 platform (The GIGABYTE GA-Z97X-SLI is a good choice) and either a high-end i5, such as the 4690K, or an i7, like the 4790K

thanks for the reply. I'm going to be using the computer mostly for gaming and multimedia. I have a copy of windows that I'm using on a disc so I'm not worried about needing another license and I forgot to mention but I am currently running two monitors with my card and I mentioned multi-GPU because I would like to add a third. Is it better to do one GPU with multiple displays? I remember reading somewhere that when you do multiple displays it taxes the gpu twice as much than if you did only one.



#4 DJBPace07

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Posted 23 December 2014 - 11:18 PM

System Builder/OEM copies of Windows can be on a disc as well, make sure you have either an unused OEM/System Builder license you can use or a full, boxed retail copy of Windows you can move.

 

Most modern GPU's have a number of display outputs on them, you just need to make sure you have monitors that can use them.  You can certainly use one powerful card with multiple displays.  Some businesses use integrated solutions with multiple monitors, so a super powerful card isn't required for simple multi-display setups.  If you are using a 4K monitor or wanting to do something like Eyefinity or Nvidia Surround, you may need multiple GPU's to handle the extremely high resolutions.  I've only ever used multiple monitors in a business setting with the desktop extended on the second monitor.  This setup places few demands on the GPU beyond a single monitor setup, however, gaming across several monitors is a completely different case but only while you are gaming.


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