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Problems with installing Linux mint 17 from DVD


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#1 LM17_Jen_Cooper

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Posted 21 December 2014 - 03:31 PM

Recently, I burned a copy of Linux mint 17 to DVD. I'm sure I burned the image's contents to DVD correctly and not the file itself, like the directions told me to do. It seems to boot just fine, otherwise. The only problem is that I can't seem to get it to install. After it boots up, I press enter to get to the Welcome menu and then enter again to tell it to start Linux mint, but then nothing much else happens after that and no other menus come up. Maybe I'm very impatient for it to work and assume it's taking forever to do anything. I'm not sure what's going on. I tried getting help from both my dad and Free Geek for it, but so far, I'm not sure if it's really working. Can you help me out?



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#2 NickAu

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Posted 21 December 2014 - 03:36 PM

Hi Jen :welcome:   Welcome to BC.
 
Can you please tell me the PC specs of the machine you are trying to install to?
 
Things like.
Operating system on the PC.
How much ram it has.
How big the Hard drive is.
Any Video cards fitted.
 
 

Some problems are more complicated than others and require additional work to isolate the issue. So, try not to overwhelm the user with possible conflicting information during the troubleshooting process. Wait for the user to report back that step 1 is done and the result before suggesting anything new,

Stay on topic Please.

Thank's
Nick.

 



Be Verbose
When you ask for support you should also include as much information about the problem as possible. Including all of the important details in your first post will greatly speed up the entire support process and allow our volunteers to better assist you. While you may think a particular error message isn't very helpful, it may be the key to resolving your issue. Some details we are looking for would include, but not be limited to:

  •     Your distribution's name (Mint, Ubuntu, Debian, etc), version (17, 14.04, 7, etc), and architecture (32-bit, 64-bit).
  •     Provide relevant information about your physical hardware or installed software.
  •     Share relevant log files, screenshots, detailed error messages, or anything else that could be used to troubleshoot your issue.

[Community Standards] Properly Giving & Receiving GNU/Linux Support


Edited by NickAu, 21 December 2014 - 03:41 PM.


#3 bmike1

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Posted 21 December 2014 - 03:39 PM

what burner software did you use?


A/V Software? I don't need A/V software. I've run Linux since '98 w/o A/V software and have never had a virus. I never even had a firewall until '01 when I began to get routers with firewalls pre installed. With Linux if a vulnerability is detected a fix is quickly found and then upon your next update the vulnerability is patched.  If you must worry about viruses  on a Linux system only worry about them in the sense that you can infect a windows user. I recommend Linux Mint or, if you need a lighter weight operating system that fits on a cd, MX14 or AntiX.


#4 bmike1

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Posted 21 December 2014 - 03:40 PM

perhaps you got a bad burn. Decrease the speed of the burner and burn it again.


Edited by bmike1, 21 December 2014 - 03:44 PM.

A/V Software? I don't need A/V software. I've run Linux since '98 w/o A/V software and have never had a virus. I never even had a firewall until '01 when I began to get routers with firewalls pre installed. With Linux if a vulnerability is detected a fix is quickly found and then upon your next update the vulnerability is patched.  If you must worry about viruses  on a Linux system only worry about them in the sense that you can infect a windows user. I recommend Linux Mint or, if you need a lighter weight operating system that fits on a cd, MX14 or AntiX.


#5 bmike1

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Posted 21 December 2014 - 04:45 PM

I was on Mint's website and read:

 

Note: Linux Mint 17.1 places its boot files in /boot/efi/EFI/ubuntu to work around this bug.

Kubuntu 13.10 is broken for UEFI installs. You will just get the grub2 cli after reinstall..

Its a really stupid bug - with a really easy fix - you just need to copy the kubuntu folder in the efi directory to ubuntu.

i.e

sudo cp -rv /boot/efi/EFI/kubuntu /boot/efi/EFI/ubuntu

Will 'fix' it.

It looks like its effecting various people

i.e - randomly found this.

http://www.kubuntuforums.net/showthread.php?63589-13-10-64Bit-Beta1-UEFI-GRUB-Not-Working-After-Install

-------
So, if you are installing 17.1 there are issues. I would install Mint 17. If you are adventurous you can then upgrade to 17.1 but review this page (there are work arounds to possible issues  on this page). I investigated an on Mint there is no directory /boot/efi/EFI/ so their fix won't work.

A/V Software? I don't need A/V software. I've run Linux since '98 w/o A/V software and have never had a virus. I never even had a firewall until '01 when I began to get routers with firewalls pre installed. With Linux if a vulnerability is detected a fix is quickly found and then upon your next update the vulnerability is patched.  If you must worry about viruses  on a Linux system only worry about them in the sense that you can infect a windows user. I recommend Linux Mint or, if you need a lighter weight operating system that fits on a cd, MX14 or AntiX.


#6 LM17_Jen_Cooper

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Posted 21 December 2014 - 05:13 PM

The computer I'm trying to install Linux mint 17 on is a PC with a Linux OS that formerly had the Ubuntu desktop on it.  I was using either Brasero Disc Burner or DVD/CD Creator that was on there already to burn the DVD. Downloading it was easy and fast, since I was using Transmission BitTorrent Client that came with it. There was no indication that any of the contents on the disc  were corrupted, especially when I did an integrity check of the disc.



#7 bmike1

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Posted 21 December 2014 - 05:20 PM

that's okay. please burn it again at half the max speed.


Edited by bmike1, 21 December 2014 - 05:20 PM.

A/V Software? I don't need A/V software. I've run Linux since '98 w/o A/V software and have never had a virus. I never even had a firewall until '01 when I began to get routers with firewalls pre installed. With Linux if a vulnerability is detected a fix is quickly found and then upon your next update the vulnerability is patched.  If you must worry about viruses  on a Linux system only worry about them in the sense that you can infect a windows user. I recommend Linux Mint or, if you need a lighter weight operating system that fits on a cd, MX14 or AntiX.


#8 bmike1

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Posted 21 December 2014 - 05:57 PM

oh! and another thing..... use brasero. you access the burn speed through the properties button on the Image Burning Setup window.


Edited by bmike1, 21 December 2014 - 06:00 PM.

A/V Software? I don't need A/V software. I've run Linux since '98 w/o A/V software and have never had a virus. I never even had a firewall until '01 when I began to get routers with firewalls pre installed. With Linux if a vulnerability is detected a fix is quickly found and then upon your next update the vulnerability is patched.  If you must worry about viruses  on a Linux system only worry about them in the sense that you can infect a windows user. I recommend Linux Mint or, if you need a lighter weight operating system that fits on a cd, MX14 or AntiX.


#9 LM17_Jen_Cooper

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Posted 21 December 2014 - 10:59 PM

The architecture is 32-bit. My computer has a 1.6 Intel Inside pentium 4 processor in it.  The RAM is 512 MB DDR. The Hard Drive is 31 GB IDE.  The cover to my computer is an HP Pavillion 750n. I had downloaded the user's guide of Linux mint 17 from their website, and printed out the section of it that tells you how to install it. I chose the cinnamon version that came with all the codecs. I should of told you why I needed to get Linux mint installed on my computer to begin with. A while ago, my computer went down and I had to reinstall the system to it, but all I had were some old discs of the Ubuntu desktop to reinstall with. It was either Ubuntu 11.04 or Ubuntu 9.04, and so I chose the more current one of the two to reinstall with. Once I reinstalled Ubuntu 11.04, the system kept telling me it was out of date and could no longer provide me with any updates. Then I emailed Free Geek to tell them about it, and they recommended that I switch to Linux mint 17 instead.



#10 NickAu

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Posted 21 December 2014 - 11:26 PM

 

The architecture is 32-bit. My computer has a 1.6 Intel Inside pentium 4 processor in it.  The RAM is 512 MB DDR. The Hard Drive is 31 GB IDE

Hmm, While it should work,  512MiB ram is not enough for a full distro.

 

Here's something you may like. Puppy Linux will suit that PC just fine.

 

 

Video Not my work.

http://youtu.be/NAGTHd1k6YE

 

*NEW* Tahrpup 6.0 CE

Tahrpup uses Ubuntu 14.04 LTS Trusty Tahr packages and includes the bugfixes and improvements from the woof CE build system. It is compatible with Ubuntu 14.04 packages. The Linux kernel version is 3.14.20.

Explore the Tharpup folder at ibiblio or nluug for downloads (Try the PAE build first).

 

Download the Puppy ISO it's only 199 MiB then burn the ISO to Cd or DVD.

 

 

Now boot your PC from that CD or DVD you just made you may need to set the PC to boot from optical drive in BIOS.

 

 

As the PC begins to boot, press F1 to enter Setup.
Change the boot sequence to CD/DVD rom & Save the changes & exit!

 

 

If you like it I can show you how to set it up.

 

 

Note: Linux Mint 17.1 places its boot files in /boot/efi/EFI/ubuntu

A Pentium 4 with 512 MiB ram has not got UEFI


Edited by NickAu, 21 December 2014 - 11:35 PM.


#11 bmike1

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Posted 21 December 2014 - 11:54 PM

512 may not be enough but try mint17 to see if it is good enough. If possible max the ram to the fullest possible.

do a websearch for the make model of your computer and find out what kind of memory it take then buy it from amazon.


Edited by bmike1, 21 December 2014 - 11:56 PM.

A/V Software? I don't need A/V software. I've run Linux since '98 w/o A/V software and have never had a virus. I never even had a firewall until '01 when I began to get routers with firewalls pre installed. With Linux if a vulnerability is detected a fix is quickly found and then upon your next update the vulnerability is patched.  If you must worry about viruses  on a Linux system only worry about them in the sense that you can infect a windows user. I recommend Linux Mint or, if you need a lighter weight operating system that fits on a cd, MX14 or AntiX.


#12 bmike1

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Posted 21 December 2014 - 11:57 PM

you can upgrade the ram yourself. you only need a screw driver. unless it is a laptop. You can still do it yourself but it is harder. Go to you tube and enter '<laptop>' and 'ram' and look for videos on how to do it.


Edited by bmike1, 22 December 2014 - 12:00 AM.

A/V Software? I don't need A/V software. I've run Linux since '98 w/o A/V software and have never had a virus. I never even had a firewall until '01 when I began to get routers with firewalls pre installed. With Linux if a vulnerability is detected a fix is quickly found and then upon your next update the vulnerability is patched.  If you must worry about viruses  on a Linux system only worry about them in the sense that you can infect a windows user. I recommend Linux Mint or, if you need a lighter weight operating system that fits on a cd, MX14 or AntiX.


#13 Al1000

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Posted 22 December 2014 - 07:26 AM

Recently, I burned a copy of Linux mint 17 to DVD. I'm sure I burned the image's contents to DVD correctly and not the file itself, like the directions told me to do. It seems to boot just fine, otherwise. The only problem is that I can't seem to get it to install. After it boots up, I press enter to get to the Welcome menu and then enter again to tell it to start Linux mint, but then nothing much else happens after that and no other menus come up.


So there is no desktop display? If not, then your computer's graphics capabilities, or rather lack thereof, might be the issue. In which case I would recommend Mint 17 MATE edition, or preferably Mint 13 MATE, if you want to stick with Mint.

Tahr Puppy might not work either, but Precise 5.7.1 which is its predecessor, probably will.

Puppy Linux uses much less RAM compared to the "full" Linux distros, for the operating system itself, leaving much more available for running applications.

Does this computer already have a swap partition?



#14 wizardfromoz

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Posted 22 December 2014 - 05:16 PM

Hi LM17_Jen_Cooper (can we shorten that somehow, when we get to know you?), and :welcome:

 

Just a reference with regard to the above - whether Ubuntu, or Linux Mint, or whatever - go for the LTS (Long Term [5 years] Support) releases, they are more stable,and even ones like Mint 13 Mate thus have support until 2018. The in between sub-releases only get 6 to 9 months support, and can be problematic if you start with them.

 

Cheers

 

:wizardball: Wizard



#15 LM17_Jen_Cooper

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Posted 22 December 2014 - 09:28 PM

Thanks for the information. I'm considering going with Linux mint 17 MATE instead of the Cinnamon, since it doesn't seem to be getting me anywhere, so far. I tossed the Cinnamon disc out earlier today and am now trying to burn the MATE version with all the codecs to DVD.






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