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It would seem my motherboard is also my graphics card.


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7 replies to this topic

#1 Adynaton

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Posted 17 December 2014 - 11:43 PM

I was wanting to increase my computer's graphical power over christmas, knowing I would most likly need to also increase the actual power supplied in addition to replacing the graphics card, I go to open it up and I can not see a card. My computer is an HP Pavilion and the way this is set up Im not sure I could upgrade it. Does this mean I would have to build a computer from sctratch, only being able to save the HD, ram, DVD and cables? Or is their a way to get around that that someone has found? I've never done this before, I assumed it would be easier than this.4sd81t.jpg1y3bx3.jpg



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#2 Ezzah

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Posted 18 December 2014 - 01:12 AM

Uhm, it means that your graphics "power" is originating from your CPU, instead of a discrete GPU, I'm quite sure you could install a GPU into that PCiE Express 3 port underneath the fan.


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#3 Adynaton

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Posted 18 December 2014 - 01:41 AM

ooooh. Welp I feel moronic. thank you.



#4 Ezzah

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Posted 18 December 2014 - 02:10 AM

That's ok, at least now you know :). Do you have any other questions?


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#5 Adynaton

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Posted 18 December 2014 - 05:47 AM

 Well, after finding out I know less that I thought, I guess I am interested in learning more about the structure of computers, maybe you can point me to a source?



#6 Ezzah

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Posted 18 December 2014 - 06:33 AM

Something like this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_hardware

 

Would be good to start, just any googling bro :)


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#7 spelingchampeon

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Posted 19 December 2014 - 10:06 PM

ooooh. Welp I feel moronic. thank you.

Actually, to NOT ask the questions, ... would be moronic.

 

I can see by the pic of your motherboard, that you have a MSI 7778 v1. I took a quick gander at that motherboard on google, and it appears you 'should' have a dual cpu with anywhere from 1-4 gigs of ram. There are a couple of options that you have, but keep in mind that a lot of video cards require at least 500-550watts. I would imagine (knowing HP like I do), that your power supply will not be in that range. Not having an adequate power supply will result in many odd, strange things. Constant shut-downs or the dreaded BSOD's. If you are interested in other options outside the video card:

 

1. Your current system info is? (for instance, if you have Windows 32bit, it might not do you any good to upgrade to 4gig memory)

2. What are your reasons/intentions for the upgrade? (if you are going to be a gamer, the video card you choose might make the game more immersive)

3. Your spending budget? (see question 2 above)

4. Working knowledge on computers? (willing to jump in and learn - which can get complicated and risky)

 

I would suggest checking out WHAT you have, before going forward and upgrading. There are a couple of programs that I use quite often to check whatever PC I'm working on. You can choose either SPECCY or HWINFO (just use your favorite search engine, but d/l from the publishers site, or a trusted host.. to be on the safe side). I love SPECCY, but I sometimes it fails on 1st boot, but a 2nd boot is perfectly fine. HWINFO has a ton of stuff to look at, but can be a little intimidating too.



#8 ssgtjeffward

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Posted 03 January 2015 - 12:21 PM

Not to throw a wet blanket on things but I would be surprised if your power supply would have a connection for the newer graphics cards. A lot of the newer cards require a cable directly from the power supply. You could try an older design of graphics card but some of them do not have drivers for windows 7 or 8. Also if you upgrade your power supply it might not have the proper connections for your older board. I know this from a painful experience of my own.






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