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Best Custom Computer components for my needs


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#1 Miroku16

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Posted 15 December 2014 - 10:14 PM

Okay, so I have been in the market for a new computer. I have been wondering about a laptop. However, I have been told that based on my criteria, I may be more suited for building a customdesktop computer. If so, what would be the best parts to have that will fit my criteria?

My criteria and needs:


An i5 or i7 processor
A computer that has gaming capabilities (I'm not a pro gamer, so I don't need state of the art performance components)
A dvd drive is preferred but not mandatory(it can be separate)
A system that could possibly capture and stream video game footage while playing
Preferred to be under $1000

To provide a better picture, here is what I see myself using my computer for:

Web surfing
Typing future papers and using Microsoft Office
Video editing
Watching videos
Playing games efficiently ( primarily Dota 2)

Please let me know what options I have that fits this criteria. Thank you.


Former Computer: HP Pavilion dv7-4087cl laptop

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#2 Digital_Veil

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Posted 15 December 2014 - 11:00 PM

900$ Build
 
PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

CPU: Intel Core i5-4430 3.0GHz Quad-Core Processor ($177.90 @ SuperBiiz)
Motherboard: ASRock H87M Pro4 Micro ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($173.78 @ Amazon)
Memory: Crucial Ballistix Sport 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($72.98 @ OutletPC)
Storage: Sandisk ReadyCache 32GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($39.99 @ Micro Center)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($51.85 @ OutletPC)
Video Card: MSI GeForce GTX 770 2GB TWIN FROZR Video Card ($299.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Case: Fractal Design Arc Mini MicroATX Mini Tower Case
Power Supply: SeaSonic 620W 80+ Bronze Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($81.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($16.98 @ OutletPC)
Total: $915.44
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-12-15 23:01 EST-0500
 
1000$ Build

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

CPU: Intel Core i5-4590 3.3GHz Quad-Core Processor ($189.58 @ OutletPC)
Motherboard: ASRock Z97 PRO4 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($96.48 @ Newegg)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($84.97 @ Directron)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($51.85 @ OutletPC)
Video Card: MSI GeForce GTX 970 4GB Twin Frozr V Video Card ($349.99 @ Amazon)
Case: Corsair 300R ATX Mid Tower Case ($59.99 @ Micro Center)
Power Supply: SeaSonic G 550W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($81.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Optical Drive: Samsung SH-224DB/BEBE DVD/CD Writer ($14.98 @ OutletPC)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.98 @ OutletPC)
Total: $1019.80
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-12-15 23:04 EST-0500

Edited by Digital_Veil, 15 December 2014 - 11:04 PM.


#3 gavinseabrook

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Posted 16 December 2014 - 02:00 AM

There is THIS bundle all on Newegg for a DIY combo kit that is relatively decent. Comes with the following for $666.99

 

CPU: AMD FX-8350 8-Core 4.0GHz

Motherboard: ASUS M5A99FX PRO

Memory: HyperX Fury Black Series 8GB DDR3-1600

HDD: Western Digital Blue 1TB SATA 6.0Gb/s

CASE: RAIDMAX Black/Orange Steel ATX Mid tower Case

VideoCard: MSI GeForce GTX760 2GB

PowerSupply: RAIDMAX 535W Power Supply (SLI/Crossfire Ready)

 

This build does not come with an Optical Drive or Operating system, so looking at Digital_Veil's post above, you can get those extra parts for about $110.00 more. This brings this system up to about $770.00

 

I  would say though, the build that Digital posted above for the $1000.00 would definitely be future proof for a little while. If you can spend a little bit extra though, I would recommend going to the X99 platform and take advantage of DDR4 memory, but it seems like what you use the computer for, it would be a bit excessive. I for one do a lot of productivity stuff, but I also love to play games on my rig, but it did get expensive fast!


Gavin Seabrook

 


#4 DJBPace07

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Posted 16 December 2014 - 07:16 AM

The builds Digital posted are good.  I would swap out the motherboards for an Asus or Gigabyte model though.  ASRock boards have a history of being a bit thin.  Unless you are aiming for a space saving design, a standard ATX in a mid-ATX case should be considered given the extra space for cooling and spreading out of the components.  I also suggest getting a larger SSD than 32GB.  A larger cache is good, but you would probably get more use out of a standard SSD.


Edited by DJBPace07, 16 December 2014 - 07:53 AM.

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#5 Miroku16

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Posted 16 December 2014 - 09:22 PM

Those are good choices, especially digital's. If I wanted to use a gigabyte or ASUS motherboard, what would I need? Does it matter what type of Asus or gigabyte board use?

#6 Digital_Veil

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Posted 16 December 2014 - 11:28 PM

Here is a good guide on how to pick the right motherboard: http://www.tomshardware.com/faq/id-1778157/select-motherboard-guide-tutorial.html

 



#7 Ezzah

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Posted 17 December 2014 - 12:40 AM

I do agree with the fact that ASRock motherboards do not make the standard that Gigabyte and Asus push, and the extra money would probably be best in a long term run.


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#8 DJBPace07

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Posted 17 December 2014 - 06:34 AM

Since you are getting an LGA 1150 CPU, you need an LGA 1150 motherboard.  If you are going Asus or Gigabyte, you just need to find one with the features you want.  If you are planning on getting an AMD CPU, you would need a different motherboard.

 

LGA 1150 boards

Here is a micro-ATX motherboard:  GIGABYTE GA-Z97MX-Gaming 5 LGA 1150 Intel Z97

Here is a standard ATX motherboard:  GIGABYTE GA-Z97X-SLI LGA 1150 Intel Z97


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#9 Miroku16

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Posted 17 December 2014 - 10:05 PM

Okay, cool. Is it better to have a standard or micro-atx? Also, what is the difference between the gaming micro-atx from the standard?

Another question is why is there an emphasis on a video card as opposed to a graphics card and what is the main difference related to my computer needs?

#10 Ezzah

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Posted 18 December 2014 - 02:13 AM

Depends whether you would like a large or smaller case (normally that is what dictates the requirement of a uATX). 

 

Standard ATX (full-size) just have more complete features (normally not needed, like auto over-clocking, etc). If it's a gaming PC, I do recommend standard though.


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#11 DJBPace07

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Posted 18 December 2014 - 08:08 AM

To expand on what Ezzah said, the standard ATX boards are also more spread out and can run a little cooler.  Micro-ATX boards are good for small form factor PC's or HTPC's.  Gamers and those needing performance generally go with standard ATX boards.


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#12 Miroku16

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Posted 18 December 2014 - 10:14 PM

Oh, I see. Also, why the extra emphasis on a video card over a graphics card? Meaning, what is the main impact of having a dedicated video card?

#13 gavinseabrook

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Posted 19 December 2014 - 01:22 AM

Having a dedicated GPU will take the stress off your CPU and memory. Integrated graphics are kinda bad for playing games (unless you use an AMD APU processor). But the reason you want to get a full ATX if you have a dedicated graphics card is because it means you get a bigger case. Graphics cards are pretty long. Even in my ThermalTake Armor Series Full ATX case my dual GTX 670 cards take up a lot of room (About 11-13 inches long).


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#14 Miroku16

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Posted 19 December 2014 - 06:01 AM

So is a video card the same as a graphics card? I'm seeing no difference in the descriptions online. Will this help with just video editing or can it also help with gaming? Also, does it have the capabilities of video capturing, the ones that were recommended to me?

#15 Ezzah

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Posted 19 December 2014 - 07:50 AM

Video card and graphics card are the same thing, they are interchangeable terms. Premiere and such video editing software CAN be set to use the GPU for rendering; however, I do believe these need to be changed manually otherwise they will still be done by the CPU. 

 

Video capturing rely on both GPU and CPU, it depends on the capturing software, but it would be a massive help to have the GPU (this must be utilised by the capturing software, and by no means 'just happens to use GPU because it's there' to be faster).


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