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Corsair H80i or Cooler master evo 212?


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#1 threebills

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Posted 15 December 2014 - 10:19 AM

so of these 2,which will keep my CPU cooler?Im not looking to overclock,just want something better than the stock cooler.Im not concerned with noise or the monetary difference,just which will keep it cooler.I can look at benchmarks all day but would like to hear from people that have used the 2.Thank you....



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#2 threebills

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Posted 15 December 2014 - 12:21 PM

errrr,i think you posted on the wrong thread



#3 zingo156

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Posted 15 December 2014 - 03:55 PM

The h80i would likely keep the cpu cooler... however, I am not a fan of liquid cooling unless you are for certain going to be overclocking as far as you can go, since you say you won't be overclocking my vote is for the evo 212.  I have an evo 212 on my 4770k and it will overclock to 4.0ghz stable. The main reason I prefer air cooling is: less failure points, liquid coolers have water pumps that I have seen fail, often there is no error when the pump fails, (sometimes there is a fan failure warning from the mainboard). Also even though some of the systems are fully enclosed, I have seen those lose liquid somehow and then your cpu gets warm or overheats. If the hoses or seals happen to leak on your mainboard, well even though they say it is non corrosive liquid, every time I have seen damage done to the board and in some cases other components.

 

Liquid is great for extreme overclocking, air is better for minor overclocking and reliability.


Edited by zingo156, 15 December 2014 - 03:58 PM.

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#4 the_patriot11

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Posted 15 December 2014 - 07:09 PM

Im with zingo, unless your planning on doing some major overclocking, liquid cooling is a bit excessive. In fact, with a good case and heatsink, you can pull of some really extreme overclocking on a air-cooled system. 


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