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Router Configuration Assistance Needed


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#1 BigD_NC

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Posted 14 December 2014 - 12:25 AM

Hello all, I am looking for some guidance on the optimal router configuration.  A few months ago I purchased a new router, Netgear N600 (model WNDR3400).  For internet service I have the 20 mbps from Time Warner Cable.  My internet speeds have been extremely slow, so I went out and purchased a dual band adapter for my laptop.  After installing the software, I did a speed test and I'm only getting 4-5 mbps.  I shut off the built in wifi on the laptop and am only using the adapter and this doesn't help.  When I plug the network cable directly from the modem to my laptop, I'm getting the 20mbps.

 

I logged into the router but don't know enough about the configuration so I didn't want to adjust anything and screw it up worse.

 

For what it's worth, these devices are configured for wifi:

 

Laptop

PS3 (gaming or Netflix)

2 iPhones

Roku

 

Please let me know what additional information I can provide.

 

Thanks for your help!



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#2 bludgard

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Posted 14 December 2014 - 01:17 PM

1) Do the speeds increase if the laptop is closer to access point/router?

2) Do the internal NIC and USB NIC transfer at the same speed?

3) Does this network "throttling" happen with other wireless devices?

4) Is the wireless network password protected?

5) How many devices are connected to this router?

 

Thanks



#3 CaveDweller2

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Posted 14 December 2014 - 09:16 PM

What speeds do you get when directly connected to the modem?


Hope this helps thumbup.gif

Associate in Applied Science - Network Systems Management - Trident Technical College


#4 BigD_NC

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Posted 14 December 2014 - 10:24 PM

The distance thought had crossed my mind.  So after running some errands, and when everyone was out of the house and only my laptop was online, I brought my laptop next to the router.  I got 21 mbps download.  So I assumed that the distance was the problem.  Then I came back upstairs and for the fun of it I ran the speed test again and got 21 mbps.  So it's hit or miss I guess.  Perhaps when my son is home he is sucking up some of the bandwidth with either his phone or PS3 (either playing a game or streaming TV).

 

So in that case what's the solution, is it an issue with the router or the internet speed itself.  I just don't know if there is an "optimal" setup for routers, I guess is what my problem is. 



#5 bludgard

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Posted 15 December 2014 - 08:08 AM

..., is it an issue with the router or the internet speed itself.

I personally do not see an issue. Routers are setup pretty optimally out-of-the-box (for most environments; some need to be custom configured for various reasons).

Many factors are involved with wireless connections: I posted only a few above. One must also factor in electrical wires in floors and walls, microwave(s), Bluetooth, cordless and wireless phone(s) and any other radio frequency emitting device(s). Gaming systems are hell on networks (bandwidth hogs - maybe consider configuring the gaming system network settings).

One could move the router to a more central position.

Acquire a network extender. I have one like this. One can connect via wireless as well as Ethernet from the device.

Install a software router (like Connectify) on a machine (laptop or desktop) and use the devices on-board or USB NIC to extend a wireless signal.

One can put a "cap" on each devices bandwidth allocation. See manual for your particular router.

Networking can be a bleep as more devices are added. There really is no "one setting fits all". Like most anything about us (fingerprint, say), every aspect of our lives are customized.

Hope this has been helpful.



#6 BigD_NC

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Posted 15 December 2014 - 11:28 AM

May be a stupid question but...if I increase the speed of my plan (to say 50 mbps) does that solve the problem?  Or is the router the limiting factor?



#7 bludgard

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Posted 23 December 2014 - 10:15 AM

Forgive my inattention:

I would say that the limiting factor is signal strength. The lower the signal strength (regardless of what network monitor used); the more unstable the connection.






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