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Reducing Computer Core Temperatures?


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#1 Storm Eagle

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Posted 13 December 2014 - 09:27 PM

Is there any specific way I can reduce my core temps? They seem to get hotter and hotter every day.... it's getting really bad now. My CPU keeps throttling (my CPU is throttling as I am typing), my Thermal Junction max keeps reaching 0, CPU temps going up to 80+ degrees Celsius. This is not good, can anyone help me?


Edited by Storm Eagle, 13 December 2014 - 09:28 PM.


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#2 KingdomSeeker

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Posted 14 December 2014 - 09:39 AM

Hi Storm Eagle, You might be better served to post this one in the Internal Hardware Forum her on BP.



#3 Romeo29

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Posted 14 December 2014 - 09:55 AM

There are many reasons responsible for high temperatures of hardware components like accumulation of dust, poor ventilation, thermal paste malfunction etc.

 

You can start by opening up your PC cabinet (in case you have notebook computer, you need to take it to professionals) and use a can of compressed air to blow out the dust from heat sinks and fans. You can also use a simple paint brush to remove the dust from ventilation holes. Be careful not to misplace or shake anything specially the heat sinks.

 

If none of this brings down the temperature, the problem could be that the thermal paste has gone bad (usual after 3-4 years) which needs to be replaced.



#4 Storm Eagle

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Posted 14 December 2014 - 11:32 AM

Hi Storm Eagle, You might be better served to post this one in the Internal Hardware Forum her on BP.

 

Sorry for posting in the wrong place.

 

There are many reasons responsible for high temperatures of hardware components like accumulation of dust, poor ventilation, thermal paste malfunction etc.

 

You can start by opening up your PC cabinet (in case you have notebook computer, you need to take it to professionals) and use a can of compressed air to blow out the dust from heat sinks and fans. You can also use a simple paint brush to remove the dust from ventilation holes. Be careful not to misplace or shake anything specially the heat sinks.

 

If none of this brings down the temperature, the problem could be that the thermal paste has gone bad (usual after 3-4 years) which needs to be replaced.

 

Yeah. It's a notebook. I'll try and get it restored by a pro. Thanks.






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