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I'm pretty new to all this Linux business...


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#1 Wesker1984

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Posted 11 December 2014 - 04:59 AM

I tried out Linux Mint earlier this year, started with 16 but it was just around the release of 17 and so I quickly went to that, unfortunately it crapped out on me (probably my fault for not waiting a couple of months while issues got ironed out), and so I abandoned the Linux idea for a while.

 

Yesterday I installed Ubuntu 14.04 LTS, and so I now have a few questions:

 

1. I liked the cinnamon desktop of Mint, is it compatible with Ubuntu (I read that Mint is Debian/Ubuntu based)? Plus how would I get it if so?

 

2. I know that malware that is Linux based is rare, but it's out there, are there any good day-zero antimalware apps for Linux out there? I know I'm highly unlikely to become infected but I'd like to make myself even less of a target!

 

3. I'm not a coder or anyone who likes to try and remember hundreds of CLI commands, my area is hardware/networking (studying for CCNA). Is there a good resource out there for quick reference of commands? Particularly pertaining to SNMP diagnostics.

 

4. Troubleshooting tools, if I am to start recommending Linux to clients in the future I figure that I better damn well make sure I can troubleshoot and fix common problems, any diagnostic tools around at all?



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#2 buddy215

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Posted 11 December 2014 - 07:49 AM

Easy enough to find how to install Cinnamon on Ubuntu. But the solution is with risk. As is plainly stated. Not an official Ubuntu hosted solution.

 

How to Install Cinnamon from a PPA on Ubuntu 14.04 - OMG! Ubuntu!

 

QUOTE.....You can update your system with unsupported packages from this untrusted PPA by adding ppa:lestcape/cinnamon to your system's Software Sources.


“Every atom in your body came from a star that exploded and the atoms in your left hand probably came from a different star than your right hand. It really is the most poetic thing I know about physics...you are all stardust.”Lawrence M. Krauss
A 1792 U.S. penny, designed in part by Thomas Jefferson and George Washington, reads “Liberty Parent of Science & Industry.”

#3 mremski

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Posted 11 December 2014 - 09:35 AM

#3 One doesn't need to remember hundreds of CLI commands, remember "man -k" or "apropos".  In truth you don't wind up using a lot of different commands.  But you do need to remember Unix philosophy:  small, do one thing well, use standard-in and standard-out.  Then you start doing fun stuff like ls -altr | grep "Dec 11" | awk '{print $NF}" > files.today  Pipes, redirection, sed, awk, bash/shell programming, you can remember more than enough to be very dangerous.  Hardware get used to what's in dmesg and /proc, networking: ifconfig, ping, traceroute, iptables (packet filtering/firewalling) are all things to have at least passing knowledge of.  Sorry, can't help on SNMP stuff, my areas are typically lower than that.

 

#4: troubleshooting what?  networking stuff, ping, traceroute, ifconfig, route/netstat gets you a long way.  hardware:  dmesg/console boot gives you the best clues as to what's wrong.  Most of the Unix/Unix-like have lagged behind Windows in video drivers and wireless networking hardware, but trust me it is much better today than when I had to have a specific version of a Soundblaster card if I wanted a CDROM and you don't have to worry about a.out vs ELF executables.

 

If you have specific past cases of what you had to diagnose/troubleshoot it makes it easier to give ideas on what tools are available to help.

 

All just my opinions, others may agree, disagree.  Feel free to disregard if you want.


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#4 NickAu

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Posted 11 December 2014 - 04:15 PM

How to properly install Cinnamon 2.4.5 on Ubuntu 14.04 Trusty Tahr system.

 

First you need to purge  nemo.

 

These 3 commands will not harm your computer , so run them to ensure a smooth install..

 sudo apt-get install ppa-purge
 sudo ppa-purge ppa:webupd8team/nemo
 ppa:gwendal-lebihan-dev/cinnamon-nightly 

Next , we need to add the Cinnamon PPA,

 sudo add-apt-repository ppa:tsvetko.tsvetkov/cinnamon
 sudo apt-get update
 sudo apt-get install cinnamon

To remove .

sudo ppa-purge ppa:tsvetko.tsvetkov/cinnamon

Edited by NickAu, 11 December 2014 - 05:04 PM.


#5 bmike1

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Posted 12 December 2014 - 08:14 PM

here is a linux dictionary

http://www.amazon.com/Linux-System-Commands-Patrick-Volkerding/dp/0764546694

as for apropos: very good command. to use it type 'apropos <1 word what you want to do>' and then whatever command 'what you want to do' appears in the man page  shows up in the output.

man <command> (which wasn't mentioned) is the manual of the command.

 

I just read some reviews on amazon and while I found the book good most others didn't.They recommend some books so maybe those are better.


Edited by bmike1, 12 December 2014 - 08:34 PM.

A/V Software? I don't need A/V software. I've run Linux since '98 w/o A/V software and have never had a virus. I never even had a firewall until '01 when I began to get routers with firewalls pre installed. With Linux if a vulnerability is detected a fix is quickly found and then upon your next update the vulnerability is patched.  If you must worry about viruses  on a Linux system only worry about them in the sense that you can infect a windows user. I recommend Linux Mint or, if you need a lighter weight operating system that fits on a cd, MX14 or AntiX.


#6 NickAu

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Posted 13 December 2014 - 04:07 AM


here is a linux dictionary
http://www.amazon.com/Linux-System-Commands-Patrick-Volkerding/dp/0764546694
as for apropos: very good command. to use it type 'apropos <1 word what you want to do>' and then whatever command 'what you want to do' appears in the man page  shows up in the output.
man <command> (which wasn't mentioned) is the manual of the command.
 
I just read some reviews on amazon and while I found the book good most others didn't.They recommend some books so maybe those are better.

 

An A-Z Index of the Bash command line for Linux.
http://ss64.com/bash/
 
Plus there are all types of free books here Have links to good (free) Linux & LibreOffice e-books? Share them here.
Why go to Amazon and spend $33 when you don't have to?


Edited by NickAu, 13 December 2014 - 04:09 AM.





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