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Microsoft makes a nod to subscriptions for Windows 10


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#1 NickAu

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Posted 08 December 2014 - 10:28 PM

 

Even as it has cut the price of Windows—offering it for free on phones and small screen tablets, plus there's a Bing edition for everything else—Microsoft is still working on ways to monetize its platform. Chief Operating Officer Kevin Turner was speaking to investors last week, and GeekWire reported that profits are still the goal.

Asked if the plan was to make Windows a loss leader to draw people into the Microsoft ecosystem, Turner said that the company had "not had any conversations" on this. He reiterated this when asked if the company was going to start losing money on Windows, saying "that's not any conversations that we've had... we've got to monetize it differently."

What form might that different monetization take? Turner says that "there are services involved. There are additional opportunities for us to bring additional services to the product and do it in a creative way."

Microsoft makes a nod to subscriptions for Windows 10

 

If this is true,  we going to need a bigger Linux section.


Edited by NickAu, 08 December 2014 - 10:29 PM.


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#2 JohnC_21

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Posted 08 December 2014 - 10:48 PM

It will be a cold day in Hell before I pay any kind of subscription fee to Microsoft. I am doing completely fine with linux, thank you. And, Windows 7 is good till 2020.

#3 NickAu

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Posted 09 December 2014 - 01:05 AM

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#4 cat1092

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Posted 09 December 2014 - 04:04 AM

Windows 7 will now be guaranteed to get at least a three year extension, MS is already pulling this with Office 2013, many who has Office 2010 are holding on to what they have. 

 

This subscription business won't fly, and would be the single most reason why Windows 10 would be an instant flop, as many doesn't need new computers. Lost who bought those with Windows 8 or 8.1 simply installed Windows 7 legally, and took control over their computer in the process by disabling Secure Boot. A feature that benefits no one except Microsoft. They have a command center, that like a nuclear war control one, requires two separate Microsoft employees to flip the switch that the precise time, all Windows 8 & 8.1 computers with Secure Boot enabled, the lights will go out. 

 

Secure Boot is locking users out of their physical property, the OS belongs to MS, but the unknowing consumer is actually handcuffed to an extent. 

 

Windows 10 will be no different, and may be worse. What if MS decides the handcuffs cannot come off, such as with the ARM based tablets? NVIDIA is back in the chip business, AMD has an ultra small one, and now this? Windows 10 by subscription only? 

 

We warned everyone months ago, here. There's a reason why Windows 8.1 is known by some as the "Prison Edition", giving a whole new meaning to "WinPE". 

 

http://www.freeyourselffrommicrosoftandthensa.org/02-superbugs-and-cyber-wars/2-4-uefi-the-microsoft-nsa-kill-switch

 

 

 

It will be a cold day in Hell before I pay any kind of subscription fee to Microsoft. I am doing completely fine with linux, thank you.

 

Same here, and also have five Windows 7 installs (2 on the same PC). I guess there's no need for me to do any further testing. 

 

Also, Windows 7 computers are hotter than ever, both Dell Online & Costco has a great lineup of new Windows 7 computers. In fact, over half of the XPS 8700 lineup is Windows 7 powered. Costco is selling Dell, Toshiba & HP Windows 7 Pro computers at great pricing. much lower than the OEM's sells them for, and best of all, adds a year to the end of the OEM warranty at no extra charge. Purchase a new Windows 7 computer before it's too late, if budget allows, one for each member of the family. 

 

 

 

If this is true,  we going to need a bigger Linux section.

 

We sure will, a lot bigger. Consumers are tired of being gouged for cash, and this is serious gouging. For starters, one can outright purchase Windows 7 Pro for $129 (USD), and Home Premium is still available for as little as $85. That's a one time fee & done. Stock up while available or learn Linux, before it's too late. Learning early will keep users from others looking to shaft Linux users by offering "classes" for a fee, that will do no more than what we do, and actually less. 

 

Even $5 month per computer is too much, over a 5 year timeframe, that's still $300, plus any initial setup fees & taxes. I cannot freely express my outrage at the thought of this. However one thing for sure, if this is true, MS has received their last dollar from me, my next PC will be self built, and will not pay any MS tax to get one. Actually there's a clause to refuse the EULA & legally, the OEM is obligated to furnish a blank hard drive (as well as a refund of the cost of Windows), but most will mess one around, and tell them that the computer will need to be returned at the customer's expense, that's why few pushes it. Because it would cost more. 

 

Fortunately, Dell already has Ubuntu computers, for consumers & businesses, and if this rumor hold truth, this would be a great opportunity for a big OEM to part ways with MS & team with WalMart to mass produce & sell new Linux computers of all types. Dell already has an edge, having their feet wet already, but HP/Compaq cannot be counted out, nor can Acer/Gateway, whom are desperate for sales. 

 

Am not on the computer now that has the Windows Technical Preview installed, but come the morning, it's good as gone.  :smash:

 

I'm not bound by the chains of Microsoft, and neither are many who reads this Topic, Home users can do quite well with Linux Mint 17.1 MATE edition, and it's as close as a drop in replacement as possible to Windows. Screams on most Vista powered computers, and a downright stunning OS, great for newbies & pros alike. 

 

Thinking of it in this perspective, I hope that MS does in fact pulls this off. It will be the beginning of shifting the balance of power, Linux will be promoted heavily (so will other brands), MS will permanently lose customers in the process. 

 

We'll be ready on our end to handle the extra load.  :guitar:

 

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#5 rp88

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Posted 09 December 2014 - 10:59 AM

These are the reasons i've been wondering if i should go with linux for the next computer i get. Maybe it won't be windows 10 but i speculate that soon windows will try two dirty tricks against the user, both will effectively mean they stop making operating systems for desktops and laptops and start making tablets in bigger cases. This subscription idea is the first dirty act, the second (the big crime) will be that they will cripple future operating systems so they can only install from an app store, this app store will only contain programs whose developers have had shady deals with microsoft. the other question is whether they will murder all windows 8 devices with the kill switch(is it's existence known or still speculation?) when they decide they want to make users switch to a newer version, hopefully they know that doing that would guarantee they never get another customer until hell enters thermal equilibrium with the cosmic background radiation but who knows? If microsoft wants to keep customers they are going to have to appease the user sooner or later, the more they try and ramp up the profits thye get from each individual user the less users thye will get and then the less overall profit they will make. With any luck if microsoft tries anything really underhand they will end up losing money not making it considering "was speaking to investors last week, and GeekWire reported that profits are still the goal." this might encourage them to put the user first if they want profits in the long term.
Back on this site, for a while anyway, been so busy the last year.

My systems:2 laptops, intel i3 processors, windows 8.1 installed on the hard-drive and linux mint 17.3 MATE installed to USB

#6 JohnC_21

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Posted 09 December 2014 - 03:36 PM

Personally, I think Microsoft will be moving to what in the gaming world is called DLC. You want a music player in the OS, pay up. You want to watch movies, pay up for a codec. You want Wordpad, pay up. You will not be able to install anything unless it's through the store.



#7 NickAu

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Posted 09 December 2014 - 03:59 PM

They will charge the software Dev's to host the software in the apps store, Then charge you to download it.

 

Launching a Browser you could get a little box popping up saying

 

" Windows will Launch your browser after this short add"

 

35d9qn5.jpg



#8 Guest_hollowface_*

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Posted 09 December 2014 - 10:42 PM

Wouldn't suprise me if Microsoft went to a subscription model. Phase 1 was introduction of the Microsoft Account as a sign in option (WIndows 8), and phase 2 was trying to force it by hiding the local account option (as seen when installing Windows 8.1).

 

I imagine eventually there won't be desktops/laptops anymore, just phones that can be connected to a keyboard + monitor for desktop activities (much like that project Canonical tried), and applications will shift from current day installers to, the app-like stuff we've been seeing more recently, and then eventually to web-based server-side applications so that you can have poor hardware on the client side. Oh, and most everyone will have all their data in the cloud.



#9 JohnnyJammer

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Posted 09 December 2014 - 11:50 PM

Im not sure what the big deal is with Windows 8.1, its a great OS as far as im concerned and after teaching some of my end users (Around 20 so far) they all love windows 8.1.

Mind you they all hated it with a passion untill i showed them how to use it, its amazing whate educating some people can achieve.

 

Another issue people complain about is linking their computer with the cloud, well sorry but apple has been doing this for years so now MS does it its evil? pleeeease!

One thing will kill microsofts business model and that is in fact subscription to business, no way is my manager going to want to pay on-going subscription for a machine/operating system.

If anything we would move to Mac's with Windows Servers as you can now manage macs in active directory.

 

i will iterate again, a properly setup corperate PC with Windows 7 && 8 is near on bullet proof. The purpose of secure boot has been taken out of context and has been proven to be easily bypassed anyway, yes MS where trying to secure their future but who isnt in the tech world. Its a dog eat dog world these days.

 

Everything will be run from dumb devices sooner or later and everything will be run from the cloud along with the security aspects the cloud has which are not safe at all, get the SSH keys and hello world!

Anyway thats my rant for the day <(- | -)>


Edited by JohnnyJammer, 09 December 2014 - 11:51 PM.


#10 NickAu

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Posted 09 December 2014 - 11:57 PM

 

The purpose of secure boot has been taken out of context.

Agreed.

 

The Growing Role of UEFI Secure Boot in Linux Distributions

 

How to create UEFI-only bootable USB live media?

 

I run an Intel® Core i5 Processor 4460. MSI H81-P33 MB with Ubuntu with UEFI on.

.


Edited by NickAu, 10 December 2014 - 12:03 AM.


#11 cat1092

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Posted 10 December 2014 - 01:12 AM

 

 

I imagine eventually there won't be desktops/laptops anymore

 

Maybe true, but not in our lifetime. many ultra small desktop PC's are being pushed now (not much larger than a cable modem), and surprisingly, many are pleased with the performance of these. Many whom uses these are replacing huge, space hogging Media Center desktops with this type. Some of these unites ships as "barebone", meaning that RAM and a good fast SSD (this has now replaced RAM as the best "bang for the buck" performance option), as well as an OS will be needed. Others may ship complete, but may need upgrading of both RAM & SSD for better performance, so if I had to choose between the two, would go with an Intel based barebone kit. Some includes an i5 or i7 CPU & can accommodate up to 16GB of DDR3 1600 RAM. 

 

Somewhere down the road, hybrids, a combination of the best features of both notebooks & tablets will take over, as Microsoft has clearly lost the tablet war, though it's their own fault. They had XP powered tablets on the mid 2000's (around 2005/06), and threw in the towel, like other projects, feeling it was a fad that would go away. It's my guess that the one(s) whom made the final say in that matter are no longer at Microsoft, because this was a costly decision. They not only had the tablet first, also the phone, and in both cases gave up too fast. 

 

Lesson learned, not all projects are instant smash hits. The reason why I knew there were XP tablets was because during our home sale on 2006, as well as many medical visits during this time, I seen several XP powered tablets, though they were bulky then, one ones using then seemed to be pleased. Another clue that it was there is in the Control Panel option (or Services.msc) "Turn Windows Features on or off" that has an adjustment for tablet features. This was in 2009, a year or so yet before the tablet craze of today. 

 

May have been in Vista's services also, but at the current time, do not have a Vista install to verify. Don't see the option on the 64 bit version of XP that I keep as a test bed. 

 

Microsoft is even offering the sign in option on the MSN page on Windows 7 & below OS's, though I don't see the purpose, other than their Bing Rewards program, which really means nothing to me. I don't want Microsoft to know details of any of my purchases, which is why I conduct transactions on Linux Mint, period. The only things I use Windows for are general Web browsing, which includes forum participation, and sometimes will check my email, though on my most important account, I'll not open on a Windows OS. Nor the one that I use for registering for free software (Yahoo). There has been countless infections since my arrival here where Yahoo was the common denominator (though many of these also ran XP), and will not expose myself to drive by attacks just by logging into my email account. 

 

Windows 10 will offer many of the already implemented actions of Windows 8 & 8.1, continue to force partner OEM's to install Secure Boot on consumer's computers, and probably offer more ARM type of devices will appear, which is Secure Boot in solitary confinement. No other OS can be installed other than future Windows upgrades, yet I doubt there will be clear warnings in ads, on outer packaging of devices, and certainly not in ads coming from Microsoft. The best one can hope for is to purchase & try a Linux OS & see that it won't work & demand a refund from the retailer (Costco gives a 90 day no questions asked return period). Some credit cards offers up to 1 year of protection, this includes deceptive advertising. 

 

Call it as one sees fit, but to purchase a product with no one clearly warning the consumer of totally being locked out of their computer (their personal property), is as deceptive as it gets. Some of these units are not low cost either. My advise, unless one plans never to move away from Windows, no matter how low they sink, can live with no matter how much personal information they steal from us & give/sell it to others (& some not Windows/Office related at all), stay as far away from any ARM type computers as possible. Get one where Secure Boot is disabled with a few simple clicks, even if there's no plans of doing so in the future. 

 

Windows 10 may or may not be a success, that's yet to be determined. One thing that will help Microsoft is total transparency on their end, from their partner OEM's & from some of their notorious 3rd party resellers, whom will say anything to make a sale. Microsoft needs to implement extensive training on all ends to ensure this, and make sure that all cards are laid on the table with this upcoming OS, especially in the wake of the failures of Windows 8 group of OS's. 

 

Office 2013 is already available by subscription (preferred) and they give a TB of storage space per user to acquire in this manner. Yet those who purchases the most expensive edition outright doesn't get this benefit. 

 

Windows 10 subscriptions will likely have similar catches, and there's no way on this earth I'm giving full price for this OS to avoid a subscription. Not even Apple pulls these type of stunts, their OS's are low cost, their cash cow is the selling of apps, where MS cannot compete & they know it. 

 

This type of business model will be doomed from the start, and will arouse suspicions by many consumers, especially the millions already burned once by purchasing Windows 8, or computers with it preinstalled, many of which cannot to this date upgrade to 8.1 due to one issue or the other, This blood is on Microsoft's hands, as the OEM's sold these computers to work with Windows 8 (or lower), and their Upgrade Advisor lured many by stating in their assessment that all was compatible. 

 

I doubt that the same consumers will fall for the unknown twice, many of which has never participated on any tech forum, and will make the call on their own. 

 

Especially considering that there's still many Windows 7 computers on the market, hot & fast moving, loaded with features. Some even has a basic version of MS Office Student & Home (full OEM version) included at no extra charge. 

 

I'm also grateful that I'm not bound by the chains of Microsoft, and if needed, can walk away once my Windows 7 & 8.1 Pro licenses expires. Should the need to reinstall 8.1 (or Windows 8 Pro & then upgrade) becomes needed, I now know that I can do so with a local account. There are other ways to sync bookmarks between computers than being continually logged into a MS account. 

 

It's time for Microsoft to go back to 2009, and look at their smashing success of Windows 7, pretend that 8 never existed, and take things from there. Much can be learned from that historical release, most likely the best release of Windows that will ever be produced. I just don't see Windows 10 having the same impact nor success, this news only confirms it further. 

 

And even is this "news" is rumors, remember that in large part, it was continual rumors that played a huge factor in killing sales of Windows 8 before it was ever released, for all of those who purchased it & the nightmares became reality, there were many more that never gave 8 a chance. Microsoft needs to step in and squash these rumors if not true. Silence will not do them any favors & many will take such "news" as gospel & spread the word, just as in 2012. 

 

Cat


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#12 cat1092

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Posted 10 December 2014 - 01:27 AM

 

 

Im not sure what the big deal is with Windows 8.1, its a great OS as far as im concerned and after teaching some of my end users (Around 20 so far) they all love windows 8.1.

 

Could be in part due to 8.1 shipping on the computers out of the box. Of course these should work great. 

 

It's the hundreds of thousands, if not millions, who has had a horrific experience with the 8 to 8.1 upgrade, and it's the OEM's pointing the finger at MS, and MS pointing the finger back to the OEM's, which doesn't help matters at all. If the OEM sold the computer with Windows 8, they're not obligated to assist with 8.1 upgrades, and any support offered is optional on their end. 

 

Microsoft made a huge mistake delivering what in essence was, a service pack. 8.1 is treated as one for continual support for Windows 8 past 01/12/2016, just as SP1 for Windows 7 was required by a deadline to receive the same. 

 

Hopefully lessons will be learned & future SP's will be delivered the good old fashioned way, the way these worked best. The reinstall of an OS is just not the best way to do it. 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#13 rp88

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Posted 10 December 2014 - 10:35 AM

"Personally, I think Microsoft will be moving to what in the gaming world is called DLC. You want a music player in the OS, pay up. You want to watch movies, pay up for a codec. You want Wordpad, pay up. You will not be able to install anything unless it's through the store."

Exactly, a crime against the user. This type of assault on user's rights must be stopped from ever happening.

"The purpose of secure boot has been taken out of context."
The idea wasn't bad, it does give a small amount of genuine security advantages, but it should have been designed so there was only 1 way to deactivate it a physical switch under a little toggle cover on the device of every user, that way a user could at any point thye wished turn secure boot off and on and because the swtich would be basic hardware no (remote, because it's very rare an attacker gets his dirty hands on a device, he usually does it via the internet)attacker could exploit it. There are so mnay things that are overly electronic now when simple physical switches would be better.

"can walk away once my Windows 7 & 8.1 Pro licenses expires"
If licenses expire after time then hasn't windows already moved to subscription, a true non-subscription model would be "you buy our product, it's yours for all eternity, if we stop supporting it it's still yours but we won't be offering any new updates".

Edited by rp88, 10 December 2014 - 10:44 AM.

Back on this site, for a while anyway, been so busy the last year.

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#14 Guest_hollowface_*

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Posted 21 December 2014 - 03:22 PM


a true non-subscription model would be "you buy our product, it's yours for all eternity, if we stop supporting it it's still yours but we won't be offering any new updates".



I would love to see MS switch to a model like that. Currently Windows is licensed not sold, you do not own it, you just have permission to use it provided you abide by the EULA, which you agree to do just by using the software. My understanding is that the only things you own are the disc itself, and the license key. :(

 

The exact terms of one's Windows installation vary by Windows version, and type; below is a quote from my Windows 8 license.


Are there things I'm not allowed to do with the software? Yes. Because the software is licensed, not sold



- Control Panel\System and Security\System\View Details In Windows Activation\Read The Microsoft Software License Terms

 

Of course, this stuff only applies if you live in a country that recognizes/enforces such agreements.



#15 cat1092

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Posted 25 December 2014 - 03:06 AM

 

 

"can walk away once my Windows 7 & 8.1 Pro licenses expires"

 

Mine aren't subscriptions, but really I don't want to run an unsupported OS, even if the key is good for eternity, too much risk involved, like current XP consumers are doing. Playing Russian Roulette with their identity and any payment methods entered. It's been nearly 3 years since I made a transaction on Windows & likely never will again, too risky for my comfort zone.  

 

On LInux Mint or recenly released Linux Live bootable media.

 

Transactions on Windows are a no-no in this house,          

 

Cat                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        


Edited by cat1092, 25 December 2014 - 03:06 AM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 





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